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Compliments of . . . 

Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board. 



HENRY H. SPRAGUE, Chairman. 
HENRY P. WALCOTT. 
JAMES A. BAILEY, JR. 



l Ashburton Place, 

BOSTON. 



William N. Davenport, Secretary. 




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PUBLIC DOCUMENT 



. ... No. 57. 



FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Metropolitan Water and 
Sewerage Board. 



January 1, 1906. 



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BOSTON : 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 

18 Post Office Square. 

1906. 









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Approved by 
The State Board of Publication. 



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CONTENTS. 



PAGR 

I. Organization and Administration, 1 

(1) Board, Officers and Employee, 1 

(2) Offices and Buildings 3 

(3) Conveyancing, 4 

II. Metropolitan Water District .. ... ... . . . . . . 5 

III. Water Works, Construction, . 5 

(1) Wachusett Dam and Reservoir - 5 

(a) Wachusett Dam, 5 

(6) Wachusett Reservoir, 7 

(c) Forestry 8 

(d) Location, Construction and Discontinuance of Roads 9 

0) Relocation of Central Massachusetts Railroad 10 

(/) Clinton Catholic Cemetery 11 

(2) Improvement of Spot Pond Brook, 11 

(3) Police Protection 11 

(4) Acquisition of Lands and Land Settlements 12 

(5) Claims and Settlements for LOss of Business, 16 

(6) Claims and Settlements for Loss of Employment, 17 

(7) Claims and Settlements for Depreciation of Real Estate, 17 

(8) Claims on Account of Diversion of Water, . 18 

IV. Water Works, Maintenance, 18 

(1) Operation of Works, 18 

(2) Storage Reservoirs, 19 

(3) Distributing Reservoirs 21 

(4) Aqueducts, 22 

(5) Pumping Stations, 23 

(6) Pipe Lines and Pipe Yards, 24 

(7) Sewerage and Filtration Works, 25 

(a) Clinton Sewerage Works, 25 

(6) Marlborough Brook Filter-beds 25 

(c) Pegan Brook Filtration Works, . 25 

(8) Sanitary Work and Regulations 26 

(9) Quality of the Water 29 

(10) The Water Supply, 30 

V. Water Works, Financial Statement 32 

(1) Metropolitan Water Loans, Receipts and Payment? 32 

(2) Issues of Metropolitan Water Loan Bonds 33 

(3) Metropolitan Water Loan Sinking Fund, 4 ... 34 

(4) Annual Assessments and Receipts, 34 

(5) Distribution to Cities and Towns of Sums received from Water furnished to Other 

Municipalities, 35 

(6) Expenditures for the Different Works, 35 

(7) Detailed Financial Statement under Metropolitan Water Act, 39 

(a) Expenditures and Disbursements, 39 

(6) Receipts, 45 

(c) Assets, 47 

(d) Liabilities, 47 

VI. Metropolitan Sewerage Works 49 

(1) North Metropolitan System, Construction, 60 

(2) South Metropolitan System, Construction, 50 

(3) Settlements for Real Estate, 51 

(4) North Metropolitan System, Maintenance 52 

(5) South Metropolitan System, Maintenance, 53 



iv CONTENTS. 

TACK 

VII. B*wwr*g« Works, Plnanolal SUttomenl m 

(1) Metropolitan Beweragt Lommi Eleoslpti tod Payment! 56 

(a) North Metropolitan Byttem 66 

(ft) South Metropolitan System, 56 

[MOM Of Metropolitan SewersgS Loan Bonds, 57 

(3) Metropolitan Sewerage Loans Sinking Fund, 69 

t,4) Annual Appropriations, Receipts and Expenditures 69 

(6) Annual Assessments 60 

(6) Expenditures for the Different Works, f 60 

(7) Detailed Financial Statement, 61 

(a) Expenditures and Disbursements, 61 

(ft) Receipts, 64 

(c) Assets, 65 

(d) Liabilities 65 

VIII. Consumption of Water 66 

IX. Electrolysis, 68 

X. Moth Suppression, 69 

XI. Apportionment of Annual Assessment for the South Metropolitan Sewerage System, . 71 

XII. Recommendations for Additional Water Loans and Other Legislation, 72 

XIII. Extensions of the Metropolitan Sewers in the North aud South Metropolitan Districts, . 79 

XIV. Future Work 81 



Report of the Chief Engineer, 84 

Organization, 84 

Arrangement of Report, 86 

Construction, 86 

Contracts, 86 

Dam and Reservoir Department, 87 

Wachusett Dam, 87 

North Dike 94 

South Dike, 95 

Relocation and Construction of Roads, 96 

Removal of Soil .98 

Relocation of Railroads, 101 

Improving Wachusett Watershed, 103, 

Forestry, 103 

Engineering, 105 

Cement Tests, 105 

Sudbury and Distribution Departments, 106 

Office Force, 106 

Accidents 107 

Maintenance, 107 

Rainfall and Yield 107 

Storage Reservoirs, 108 

Sources from which Water has been taken 113 

Aqueducts, 114 

Wachusett, 114 

Sudbury, 114 

Cochituate 115 

Weston 115 

Pumping Stations 116 

Chestnut Dill High 8ervice, 117 

Chestnut Hill Low Service, 118 

Spot Pond, 119 

West Roxbury, 120 

Arlington, 120 

Consumption of Water, 121 

Quality of the Water, 125 

Biological Laboratory, 126 

Sanitary Inspection 126 



CONTENTS. v 

Report of the Chief Engineer — Concluded. 

Maintenance — Concluded. page 

Drainage of Swamps ' 135 

Distributing Reservoirs 135 

Weston Reservoir 135 

Chestnut Hill Reservoir 135 

Waban Hill Reservoir, 136 

Forbes Hill Reservoir and Standpipe, 136 

Spot Pond, 136 

Mystic Reservoir, 137 

Fells and Bear Hill Reservoirs, 137 

Arlington Standpipe, 137 

Mystic Lake, 138 

Pipe Lines, 138 

Metered Connections, 139 

Electrolysis 139 

Clinton Sewerage, 143 



Report of Engineer of Sewerage Works, 146 

Organization, 146 

Metropolitan Sewerage Districts 147 

Areas and Populations, 147 

Metropolitan Sewers, 148 

Sewers purchased and constructed and their Connections . 148 

Cost of Construction, . . . . 149 

Pumping Stations and Pumpage, 150 

Construction 151 

South Metropolitan System, 151 

Grading at Nut Island and Vicinity, 151 

Quincy Force Main, 152 

Grading about Ward Street Station, 152 

Reversal of Grade at the Lower End of the Charles River Main Sewer, .... 154 

Maintenance 155 

Scope of Work and Force Employed, 155 

North Metropolitan System (Table), 156 

South Metropolitan System (Table), 157 

Whole Metropolitan System (Table), 158 

Capacity and Results, 159 

North Metropolitan System, 159 

Deer Island Pumping Station, 159 

East Boston Pumping Station, 160 

Charlestown Pumping Station, 161 

Alewife Brook Pumping Station, 162 

South Metropolitan System, 163 

Ward Street Pumping Station, 163 

Quincy Pumping Station, 164 

Nut Island Screen House, 165 

Cost of Pumping, 165 

Deer Island Station 165 

East Boston Station, 165 

Charlestown Station, 166 

Alewife Brook Station, 166 

Ward Street Station 166 

Quincy Station, 167 

Care of Special Structures, 167 

Overflow at Maiden 167 

Material Intercepted at the Screens, North Metropolitan System, 167 

South Metropolitan Outfalls 168 

Additional Pumps at Quincy Station 168 

Material Intercepted at the Screens, South Metropolitan System, 168 



v\ CONTENTS. 

I'A-.K 

Appendix No. I.— Contracts relating to the Metropolitan Water Worka mado and pending during 

the Year 1905, 170 

A ppemlix No. I, — IVmciil Tests made on the Metropolitan Water Works, .... 175 

Appendix No. :?. —Tables relating to the M alntenance of the Metropolitan Water Works, . . 178 
Table No. 1. — Monthly Rainfall In Inches at Various lMacea on the Metropolitan Water 

Works In 1905 178 

Table No. 2. — Rainfall in Inches at Jefferson, Mass., In 1905, 179 

Table No. 3. — Rainfall In Inches at Framlnghani, Mass., In 1905 180 

Table No. 4. — Rainfall in Inches at Chestnut Hill Reservoir In 1905, 181 

Table No. 5. — Rainfall In Inches on tho Wachnsett Watershed, 1897 to 1905 183 

Table No. 6. — Rainfall In Inches on the Sudbury Watershed, 1875 to 1905 184 

Table No. 7. — Yield of the Wachusett Watershed In Gallons per Day per Square Mile from 

1897 to 1905, 186 

Tablo No. 8.— Yield of the Sudbury Watershed In Gallons per Day per Square Mile from 

1875 to 1905 18fl 

Table No. 9. — Wachusett System. — Statistics of Flow of Water, Storage and Rainfall in 

1905 189 

Table No. 10. — Sudbury System.— Statistics of Flow of Water, Storage and Rainfall in 1905, 190 
Table No. 11. — Cocbltuate System. — Statistics of Flow of Water, Storage and Rainfall In 1905, 191 
Table No. 12. — Elevations of Water Surfaces of Reservoirs above Boston City Base at the 

Beginning of Each Month, 192 

Table No. 13. — Average Dally Quantity of Water flowing through Aqueducts in 1905, by 

Months, 193 

Table No. 14. — Statement of Operations of Engine* Nob. 1 and 2 at Chestnut Hill High-service 

Pumping Station for the Year 1905 194 

Table No. 15. — Statement of Operations of Engine No. 3 at Chestnut Hill High-service Pump- 
ing Station for the Year 1905, 195 

Table No. 16. — Statement of Operations of Engine No. 4 at Chestnut Hill High-service Pump- 
ing Station for the Year 1905, 196 

Table No. 17. — Statement of Operations of Engines Nos. 5, 6 and 7 at Chestnut Hill Low-service 

Pumping Station for the Year 1905 197 

Table No. 18. — Statement of Operations of Engines Nos. 8 and 9 at Spot Pond Pumping Station 

for the Year 1905 198 

Table No. 19. —Average Dally Consumption of Water in Cities and Towns supplied Wholly or 

in Part by the Metropolitan Water Works, 199 

Table No. 20. — Average Daily Consumption of Water from the Low-service System, . . 199 
Table No. 21. — Average Daily Consumption of Water from the High-service and Extra High- 
service Systems 200 

Table No. 22. — Average Daily Consumption of Water in Cities and Towns supplied from 

Metropolitan Works, as measured by Venturi Meters in 1905, . . . 201 
Table No. 23. — Consumption of Water in the Metropolitan Water District, as constituted in 
the Year 1905, the Town of Swampscott and a Small Section of the Town 

of Saugus, from 1893 to 1905, 204 

Table No. 24. — Chemical Examinations of Water from the Wachusett Reservoir, Clinton, . 205 
Table No. 25. — Chemical Examinations of Water from the Sudbury Reservoir, . . . 206 

Table No. 26. —Chemical Examinations of Water from Spot Pond, Stonebam, .... 207 

Table No. 27. —Chemical Examinations of Water from Lake Cochituate 208 

Table No. 28. — Chemical Examinations of Water from a Faucet at the State nouse, Boston, . 209 
Table No. 29. — Averages of Examinations of Water from Various Parts of the Metropolitan 

Water Works in 1905, 210 

Table No. 30. — Chemical Examinations of Water from a Faucet in Boston from 1892 to 1905, . 212 
Table No. 31. — Colors of Water from Various Parts of the Metropolitan Water Works in 1905, 213 
Table No. 32. — Temperatures of Water from Various Parts of the Metropolitan Water Works 

in 1905 214 

Table No. S3. — Temperatures of the Air at Three Stations on the Metropolitan Water Works 

in 1905 215 

Table No. 34. — Table showing Length of Main Lines of Water Pipes and Connections owned 
and operated by Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board, and Number of 

Valves set in Same, 216 

Table No. 35. — Statement of Cast-iron Hydrant, Blow-off and Drain Pipes owned and operated 

by Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board 216 

Table No 36.— Length of Water Pipes, Four Inches in Diameter and Larger, in the Several 

Cities and Towns supplied by the Metropolitan Water Works, . . . 217 



CONTENTS. vii 

Appendix No. 3— Concluded. page 

Table No. 37. — Number of Service Pipes, Meters and Fire Hydrants in the 8everal Cities and 

Towns supplied by the Metropolitan Water Works, 218 

Table No. 38. — Average Maximum and Minimum Monthly Heights, in Feet, above Boston 

City Base, to which Water rose, at Different Stations on the Metropolitan 

Water Works ,219 

Appendix No. 4. — Water Works Statistics for the Year 1905 221 

Appendix No. 5. — Special Regulations of the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board relating 

to Boating and Fishing in the Waters of Lake Cochituate, .... 224 
Appendix No. 6. — Contracts relating to the Metropolitan Sewerage Works, made and pending 

during the Year 1905, 226 

Appendix No. 7. —South Metropolitan Sewerage System — Report and Award, .... 227 
Appendix No. 8. — Legislation of the Year 1905 affecting the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage 

Board, 233 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 

General View of Wachusett Dam, Waste Weir, Railroad Bridge and Lower End of Wachusett 

Reservoir Frontispiece. 

Wachusett Dam and Power and Gate House — At the End of 1905, 4 

View of Wachusett Dam and Railroad over Waste Channel, 6 

Bed of Wachusett Reservoir near Baptist Church in West Boylston, 8 

Relocation of Newton Street and Quinepoxet River Bridge at Upper End of Wachusett Reservoir, 10 
High-level Sewer — Nut Island, with Screen House and Embankment connecting it with Great 

Hill 50 

Up-stream Side of Wachusett Dam and Waste Weir, 88 

View of Waste Channel from Wachusett Dam 90 

Wachusett Reservoir — View of South Dike from Boylston Street in Boylston, .... 94 

Wachusett Reservoir — Circular Dam on Quinepoxet River above Oakdale, . . . . . 100 

Wachusett Reservoir — Improvement of Stillwater River Channel, 102 

High-level Sower — Embankment connecting Great Hill in Quincy with Nut Island, . . . 150 
High-level Sewer — Embankment connecting Island Avenue in Quincy with Locker and Other 

Sewer Buildings 152 



Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board. 



To the Honorable the Senate and House of Representatives of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts in General Court assembled. 

The Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board, established under 
the provisions of chapter 168 of the Acts of the year 1901, has 
already presented to your Honorable Body an abstract of the account 
of its doings, receipts, expenditures, disbursements, assets and lia- 
bilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1905, and now 
presents a detailed statement of the operations for the year, being its 

FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT 

made since the consolidation of the Metropolitan Water Board and 
the Board of Metropolitan Sewerage Commissioners on March 20, 
1901. 

I. ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION. 

(1) Board, Officers and Employes. 

The term of office of Henry P. Walcott, M.D., expired on March 
21, 1905, and he was reappointed for the three years next succeed- 
ing. The membership of the Board has consequently remained as 
in the preceding year : Henry H. Sprague, chairman, Henry P. 
Walcott, M.D., and James A. Bailey, Jr. William N. Davenport 
has continued as secretary, and the auditing department has been 
placed under his general supervision. Alfred F. Bridgman, who 
formerly acted as auditor, has been made the purchasing agent, and 
will also act in the future as paymaster. 

A further reduction has been made during the vear in the admin- 
istrative office force. This force now comprises : a book-keeper, 
an assistant book-keeper, an assistant in auditing, one general 
clerk, two stenographers, a telephone operator, one messenger, and 
a janitor with two assistants, one of whom acts as watchman. 



2 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

George D, Bigelow has been in charge of the conveyancing work, 

and he has been assisted 1»\ Miss Alline E. Marcy, title examiner, 
and by one stenographer. Miss Celia M. Tibbetts has performed 
the conveyancing work which has been required in the county of 
Worcester as her services have been needed. 

Frederic 1*. Steams has continued as Chief Engineer of the Board, 
with special charge of the Water Works. Joseph P. Davis and 
Hiram F. Mills are retained to act as consulting engineers if matters 
arise requiring their consideration. 

The various departments of the Water Works have been, subject 
to the Chief Engineer, in charge of the following: Dexter Brackett, 
Engineer of the Sudbury and Distribution departments; Thomas F. 
Richardson, Engineer of the Dam and Reservoir Department ; Frank 
T. Daniels, Principal Office Assistant, until December 23, when he 
resigned, and the position was abolished. 

The engineering force employed in construction on the Water 
Works has been greatly reduced. This force, both in construction 
and maintenance, has, upon the average during the year, comprised, 
in addition to the persons above named, 6 division engineers, 12 
assistant engineers, and others in various engineering capacities 
and as sanitary inspectors, clerks, stenographers and messengers, 
to the number of 62, numbering in all, 80. The maximum en- 
gineering force employed at any one time during the year on both 
construction and maintenance was 99. 

There have also been employed inspectors, other than engineering 
inspectors, to the maximum number of 5. Day-labor forces, under 
the general supervision of the engineers and the immediate direction 
of foremen, varying in numbers from time to time, have been em- 
ployed in pipe laying, in general improvements and repairs, and in 
minor operations. 

In addition, a maintenance force, numbering, upon the average 
during the year, 208, has been required at the pumping stations and 
upon the reservoirs, aqueducts, pipe lines and other works. This 
force at the end of the year numbered 173, and was divided as fol- 
lows : Sudbury and Distribution departments, 165 ; Dam and Reser- 
voir Department, 8. 

The maximum number of men employed upon construction con- 
tracts by the various contractors upon the Water Works during the 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 3 

year was for the week ending June 17, when the number amounted 
to 669. 

William M. Brown, Engineer of the Sewerage Works, has been 
in charge of both construction and maintenance upon these works. 

He was assisted during the year by 2 division engineers who were 
in charge of both construction and maintenance, 1 division engineer 
in charge of drafting room and records, 4 assistant engineers, and 
4 others, who were employed in various engineering capacities, and 
a clerk and stenographer. The maximum engineering force em- 
ployed at any one time during the year on construction and main- 
tenance of the Sewerage Works was 13. 

Day-labor forces, under the general supervision of the engineers 
and the immediate direction of foremen, have been employed on the 
High-level Sewer in building roads and grading at Nut Island and 
vicinity, and on the pumping station lot at Ward Street. 

The maximum number of men employed upon contracts and upon 
day-labor construction upon the Sewerage Works during the year 
was for the week ending July 5, when the number amounted to 60. 

The regular maintenance force required for the operation of the 
pumping stations, the care and inspection of the sewers, and for 
other parts of the Sewerage Works, exclusive of engineers and day- 
labor construction forces before enumerated, has upon the average 
numbered 118. 

The whole force of the Sewerage Department at the end of the 
year numbered 130, of whom the engineer in charge and 11 assist- 
ants and draftsmen were engaged in general upon the works, and, of 
the remainder, 74 were employed upon the North System and 44 
upon the South System. 

(2) Offices and Buildings. 

The office of the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board is in 
the buildings numbered 1 and 3 Ashburton Place, at the corner of 
Somerset Street, in which are also located the secretary's, auditing 
and conveyancing offices, and the main engineering offices of both 
the Water Works and the Sewerage Works. 

The headquarters of the Wachusett Dam and Reservoir Depart- 
ment of the Water Works have been maintained in the office building 
in Clinton. Branch offices of the Dam and Reservoir Department 



4 METROPOLITAN WATER fPub. Doc. 

were maintained, one in West Boylston and one in Oakdale, until 
November 21, and one at the Wachusett Dam until November 28. 
Headquarters of the Sudbury and Distribution departments have 
been maintained in the central otliee in Boston. For the Sudbury 
Department a branch office has been maintained at South Framing- 
ham. Branch headquarters of the maintenance force of the Water 
Works in the northern part of the District have been in buildings in 
the Grlenwood pipe yard in Medford, where there are offices, shops, 
store rooms and stables; and the maintenance force for the southern 
part of the District has headquarters in buildings at the Chestnut 
Hill Keservoir. 

Branch headquarters of the maintenance and repair forces of the 
Sewerage Works are maintained at the East Boston and Ward Street 
pumping stations and at the stock yard at Hough's Neck. 

(3) Conveyancing. 

The various settlements effected by the Board involved the ex- 
amination by the conveyancers of 47 titles in water cases, and 9 
titles in sewer cases, a total of 56. In 35 of the cases deeds w r ere 
drafted and executed. In the other cases judgments were obtained 
by agreement or after trial. 

One instrument of discontinuance of roads was drafted and exe- 
cuted, being for a part of Holbrook Street in West Boylston, and 
2 determinations have been drafted affecting highways in West 
Boylston. 

The Spot Pond hearings in the earlier part of the year required a 
large amount of work from the conveyancers, and much other work 
has been done at the request of the Attorney-General and his assist- 
ants in the preparation of cases for trial and hearing. 

By reason of the expiration, on July 1, 1905, of the time within 
which could be brought suits for damages in connection with water 
works, other than damages for real estate taken, a large number of 
new suits have been entered in court ; and for these suits examina- 
tions of titles of the lands involved are, to a greater or less degree, 
required, this being necessary whether the suits are settled by the 
Board or tried in court. A considerable portion of this work has 
been accomplished. 

The conveyancers were called upon to draft many other instru- 
ments than those above enumerated, and to make various investiga- 
tions relative to other real estate in charge of the Board. 



No. 57.] AND SEWEKAGE BOARD. 5 

During the year all the deeds remaining uncopied, relating to the 
Water Works, have been copied, as well as a considerable portion 
of the deeds relating to the Sewerage Works. 

A card index has also been in progress and is nearly finished, 
showing the names of the owners whose property has been affected 
by the operations of the Board, and memoranda as to the date, 
amount, area, and purpose of takings and deeds, with reference to 
abstracts of titles and copies of deeds. 

II. METROPOLITAN WATER DISTRICT. 

The Metropolitan Water District as now constituted comprises 
the cities of Boston, Chelsea, Everett, Maiden, Medford, Melrose, 
Newton, Quincy and Somerville, and the towns of Arlington, Bel- 
mont, Hyde Park, Lexington, Milton, Nahant, Revere, Stoneham, 
Watertown and Winthrop, in all, 19 municipalities. The District 
has an area of 171.7 square miles. The population of the District 
above comprised, as of July 1, 1905, the date upon which calcula- 
tions for the Water Works are based, is estimated at 953,580. 

III. WATER WORKS — CONSTRUCTION. 

The amount expended for construction, including real estate ac- 
quired and payment of claims on account of the Water Works, dur- 
ing the year 1905, was $655,958.47. Of this amount, $524,990.68 
was expended on account of the Wachusett Dam and Reservoir; 
$58,087.49 on account of the Weston Aqueduct and Reservoir; 
$7,164.86 for the improvement of the Wachusett watershed; $36,- 
711.68 for the acquisition of existing water works; $10,798.03 for 
construction in the Distribution Department ; and the remainder, 
$18,205.73, for various other operations on the works. The total 
amount expended for construction since the beginning of the Water 
Works in the year 1895 has been $39,044,214.23. 

(1) Wachusett Dam and Reservoir. 
(a) Wachusett Dam. 
The masonry of the Wachusett Dam was substantially completed 
during the past year, there only remaining to be laid the granolithic 
surface which is to form the finish of the top of the dam. The 
cornice stones of the dam reached the height of 415 feet above the 
Boston City Base, and the lowest point in the dam, which is in 



6 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

the cut-off trench, is 186.8 feet above the City Base. The maximum 
height of the Btructure, therefore, is 228.2 feet. The length of the 

main dam, including the terminal structures, is 971 t'vvi, and the 
length of the waste-weir beyond the bastion at the northwesterly end 
is 152 feet. The total length of the dam, including the corewall, is 
1,476 feet. The stone masonry has amounted to 263,412 cubic 
yards, the brick and concrete masonry to 10,761 cubic yards, and 
there have been used in the work 81,103 barrels of Portland cement 
and 182,480 barrels of natural cement. 

The upper gate-chamber, which is built within the structure of 
the dam, and the chamber in the bastion at the northwesterly end 
of the dam, have been completed. There still remain to be built the 
brass fences, which for protection are to surmount the dam on both 
the up-stream and down-stream sides. 

The waste-weir, which runs northwesterly at an angle from the 
bastion in the main dam, and which provides for an overflow in case 
of necessity, has been completed. Standards have been placed upon 
the weir to secure the flash-boards which are provided in order to 
prevent a waste of water from waves passing over the crest of the 
weir. A walk is also provided over the waste- weir, as well as a 
track for a car to be used in transporting the flash-boards to and 
from the storage room in the bastion. 

The work of completing the arch bridge, which forms a part of 
the permanent location of the Central Massachusetts Railroad, has 
been carried on during the year, and, upon the removal of the cable- 
way towers, the railroad embankment for the permanent track was 
completed. The arch bridge crosses the waste channel about 225 
feet below the waste- weir. The bridge has a length of about 170 
feet, with a span of 58 feet over the waste channel. East of the main 
span is a smaller arched opening, through which passes the road to 
be built upon this side of the river from the valley to the bastion. 

By the removal of the cableways and the change of the railroad to 
its permanent location, the opportunity was afforded to complete the 
excavation of the waste channel ; and at the end of the year nearly 
all of the excavation necessary had been made. 

Much Grading has been done on both the hillsides below the dam, 
and while many of the trees and shrubbery have been left, the 
ground has been covered with soil. Successive flights of granite 
steps have been built from each end of the dam to the bottom of the 




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No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 7 

valley, with granolithic walks of varying lengths between. The 
road from the bottom of the valley to the bastion on the north- 
westerly side has been partially constructed. A considerable 
amount of soil remains in the spoil banks at the northwesterly end 
of the dam, which is to be used during the coming season for cover- 
ing the slopes of the permanent railroad embankment and for other 
purposes. 

(b) Wachusett Reservoir. 

The removal of soil from the bed of the reservoir, which remained 
to be accomplished, was confined to the extreme upper end of the 
reservoir, with the exception of a small area near the South Dike, 
the soil of which had been reserved for use at the Wachusett Dam. 
The principal portion of the work in the reservoir during the past 
year consisted of excavating the material from the Stillwater River 
above the location of the Worcester, Nashua and Portland Division 
of the Boston & Maine Railroad and of enlarging and changing the 
channel of the Quinepoxet River, of the building of a concrete 
dam at the upper end of the channel in order to prevent the wearing 
away of the river bed above the location of the dam and also to pre- 
vent the filling of the upper end of the reservoir with the sand and 
gravel which would be washed down the channel. In all the work 
of the year about 276,554 cubic yards of earth and soil were re- 
moved. This material was deposited upon the railroad and high- 
way embankments, and was also taken for covering deep beds of 
muck, which it was not desirable to excavate, and for shallow flow- 
age embankments. 

Since the beginning of the work 3,941 acres have been stripped 
for the purposes of the reservoir, and there have been removed 
6,912,052 cubic yards of soil. Of the total amount of soil removed, 
4,955,936 cubic yards have been deposited in the North Dike; 
160,895 cubic yards have been deposited in the South Dike ; 1,149,- 
917 cubic yards have been used for filling shallow flowage areas; 
603,002 cubic yards have been deposited in highway and railroad 
embankments; and 42,302 cubic yards have been used for grading 
grounds near the dam and for miscellaneous purposes. 

During the year riprap to the extent of 11,991 cubic yards was 
placed upon the water face of the South Dike, where the dike will 
be particularly exposed to the action of heavy waves. The stone 
used was obtained from the waste piles of the quarry from which 



METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

the -tour for the dam was quarried, A gap in the dike through 
which the quarry railroad passed was also filled with material which 
was removed from the embankments of the quarry railroad. 

Ditches with Bides paved and hoard bottoms have been constructed 

in order to drain the swampy ground below the South Dike and the 
pit from which the sand was obtained for the construction of the 
masonry of the Wachusett Dam. A ditch has also been dug to drain 
the swampy land near the Lamson nursery upon the northerly side 
of the reservoir. 

The number of buildings in West Boylston removed from the 
reservoir site during the year was 4 1, which embraced 36 houses, 6 
barns, a store and a police station. The number of buildings re- 
moved prior to the year was 271, making the total number in West 
Boylston removed to the present time 315. The number of build- 
ings removed from the site of the reservoir since the be<nnnin£ -of 
the work has been : in Boylston 108, in Clinton 38, in Sterling 7, 
making a total removal, including West Boylston, of 468 buildings. 

Considerable work was performed during the season in obtaining 
elevations of the bottom of the reservoir after excavation had been 
completed, and already 3,420 acres out of a total of about 3,950 
acres have been covered by these final records. From the record 
sheets tables are prepared to show the capacity of the reservoir at 
each tenth of a foot up to elevation 370. Surveys of the marginal 
line of the watershed have also been in progress during the year, and 
this line has now been surveyed a distance of 38.5 miles, the total 
length of the line around the margin of the watershed being about 
69 miles. 

(c) Forestry. 

The two nurseries, one upon the north side and the other upon 
the south side of the reservoir, have been maintained. There have 
been transplanted from the beds to rows in the nurseries more than 
150,000 seedlings. The nurseries now contain some 740,000 seed- 
lings and plants, of which by far the larger number are white pines 
and arbor vita?, but there are many Scotch pines, white, Douglas and 
Norway spruces, maples, oaks, locusts and birches, besides walnuts, 
ashes, hemlocks, larches and tamaracks. 

There are about 3,348 acres of land about the reservoir belonging 
to the Commonwealth above the flow line, excluding the more re- 
mote land along the Quinepoxet River. On this land there were 



No. 57.] AND SEWEEAGE BOARD. 9 

about 1,431 acres already covered with wood. It has been the pur- 
pose to cut out fruit trees as well as mature and undesirable trees, 
and where needed to plant new growth taken principally from the 
nurseries. Areas amounting to about 250 acres were thus planted 
during the year. There have already been planted in all about 937 
acres, and there remains an area of about 483 acres which it is pro- 
posed to plant in the future. Besides about 197 acres of marginal 
land lying immediately adjacent to the shores of the reservoir, there 
are about 300 acres of land which will probably remain open and 
unplanted with trees. 

Seedlings, principally of white pine, have been planted along 
both sides of the public roads within the lands of the Common- 
wealth, and arbor vitae and white pine seedlings have also been 
planted on the outside line of the immediate marginal lands of the 
reservoir. 

The marginal line of the reservoir is 38.2 miles long, and there 
remain about 5.5 miles of the line of the marginal strip to plant 
with trees, there being a distance of about 5.7 miles along dikes, 
highways and railroads, which, as proposed, is not to be planted. 

(d) Location, Construction and Discontinuance of Roads. 

A highway has been constructed during the past year along the 
southwesterly side of the reservoir between Oakdale and West 
Boylston, the portion extending for a distance of about 2,930 feet 
being a new highway, and the remaining portion for about 2,110 feet 
to Central Street in West Boylston consisting of the improvement 
of the existing highway known as Crescent Street. 

The new highway which was built during the preceding year from 
the southerly end of the bridge over the Quinepoxet River and 
through the village of Oakdale, along the northerly side of the 
reservoir to the junction of Sterling and Lancaster streets, and the 
new highway which crosses the reservoir in West Boylston in con- 
tinuation of Worcester Street, have both been surfaced with broken 
stone. 

A small portion of Boylston Street in the town of Boylston near 
the South Dike has also been surfaced with stone. Considerable 
work has been done by the day-labor forces on other highways, in 
the grading and seeding of highway slopes, building of fences and 
railings, and widening of culverts. 



10 



METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



A location has been determined for an extension of the highway 

in Oakdale from a point near Wheeler Street, southerly across the 

railroad, Holden Street ami Qninepoxct River, and also across a 
portion of Newton Street discontinued to the part of Ncwtou Street 
still existing in the town of West Boylston. 

A new location also has been determined of the street extending 
from the above-described highway across Newton Street discontinued 
westerly to Holden Street, taking the place of the portion of Holden 
Street, extending westerly from the highway for about 1,912 feet. 

A slight change was made in the location of the new highway in 
West Boylston laid out from Worcester Street to Lancaster Street, 
changing the location of the centre line. 

The following are lists of the roads relocated and discontinued 
during the year : — 

Location of Roads in the Year 1905. 



No. 


Location. 


Description. 


Date of 
Acceptance. 


13 
14 


West Boylston, Oak- 
dale Village. 

West Boylston. 


A highway connecting the two new highways laid out in 
determination No. 12, extending southerly from the 
end of the first of said highways in Oakdale from a 
point 125 feet westerly from Wheeler Street, crossing 
the railroad, the Quinepoxet River and Newton Street 
discontinued, to the northerly end of the second high- 
way at a point in Newton Street discontinued. 

A highway extending westerly from the above connect- 
ing highway, near where it crosses the river, to Holden 
8treet. 

Amendment in the location of the new highway laid out 
in determination No. 8, from Worcester Street to Lan- 
caster Street, narrowing the width of the finished 
portion of the roadway and changing the location of 
the centre line. 


April 4,1905. 
April 18, 1905. 



Discontinuance of Roads in the Year 1905. 



No. 


Location. 


Description. 


Date of 
Discontinu- 
ance. 


26 


West Boylston, Oak- 
dale Village. 


That part of Holden Street extending from a point near 
the new highway between Oakdale and West Boylston 
near Harris Street, about 1,600 feet to the new highway 
extending westerly from the first-named highway to 
Holden Street. 


April 26, 1905. 



(e) Relocation of Central Massachusetts Railroad. 
The travelling cableways which had been used for the construction 
of the Wachusett Dam having been removed, the permanent road- 
bed of the Central Massachusetts Railroad at this point has been 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 11 

built to take the place of the temporary location first provided. 
This work required the building not only of the necessary railroad 
embankments but the arch bridge over the waste channel. Some 
further work will be necessary upon the slopes of the embankments. 
The new location has been used for the passage of trains since 
October 23. The entire length of the new location is about 1,215 
feet. 

(f) Clinton Catholic Cemetery. 

No action has been taken by either the Roman Catholic Bishop 
of Springfield or the St. John's Catholic Cemetery Association at 
Clinton, toward effecting a final settlement under the tripartite 
agreement which was executed by them and the Board on account 
of the taking of the lands of the old cemetery in Clinton for the 
Wachusett Reservoir, and the acquisition of new cemetery lands in 
Lancaster to take the place of the old grounds. 

The title to the larger part of the lands in Lancaster now devoted 
to cemetery purposes is held by the Commonwealth, and there is a 
considerable sum of money payable to the Cemetery Association 
upon the release to the Commonwealth of the old cemetery lot and 
of all claims for damages, which is awaiting an agreement between 
the two other parties. 

(2) Improvement of Spot Pond Brook. 
The city of Melrose, prior to the last report, had brought a 
petition for the appointment of commissioners under chapter 406 
of the Acts of the year 1904, being "An Act to provide for the 
improvement of Spot Pond Brook by the Metropolitan Water and 
Sewerage Board." No hearing, however, has been called for under 
the petition, and consequently no further action has been taken 
under the act. 

(3) Police Protection. 

Owing to the reduction of the areas upon which the work of con- 
struction has been carried on, the Board has been enabled to make 
a great reduction in the number of officers appointed for police 
protection. 

On January 1, 1905, the officers employed were: in Clinton 3, 
in Boylston 1, in West Boylston 5. On June 5, 2 additional 
officers were appointed in Clinton, but on November 20 the services 



12 MKTKOPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

of all the police officers employed by the towns at the expense of 
the Board were dispensed with, with the exception of those in 
Clinton, where 2 arc still retained in service. 

(l) Acquisition of Lands and Land Settlements. 

The Board acquired by purchase (luring the year 122.79 acres, 
oi' which 67.04 acres were in Iloldcn and 55.75 acres in Sterling. 
\o takings of land were made during the year. 

Settlement has been effected with the owners of all the lands 
acquired, either by purchase or by talcing, by the Board for the 
Metropolitan Water Works since the beginning of operations, ex- 
cept for 106.477 acres, not including the takings of Spot Pond and 
the contiguous lands of the cities of Maiden, Medford and Melrose, 
settlement for which is still pending. Payments on account, how- 
ever, have been made to these cities, amounting to $342,820.68. 

Settlements under purchases and takings of land, for all purposes 
of the Water Works, have been effected in the past year in 25 cases, 
and for an aggregate of 142.756 acres with the buildings thereon. 

©o © o 

Of these cases 9 were on account of the Wachusett Reservoir, 9 on 
account of the Weston Aqueduct, 4 on account of takings for a low- 
service pipe line in Medford, 2 for the improvement of the Wachu- 
sett watershed, and 1 on account of the improvement of the Sudbury 
watershed. The sums paid in all these settlements have amounted 
to $47,508.77. In 3 of these cases the settlements have been re- 
sults of suits at law, and the total amount paid in the court settle- 
ments has been $2,277.06. 

Under chapter 317 of the Acts of the year 1904, providing, in 
cases of takings under the right of eminent domain, for partial pay- 
ments in advance of the judgment of a judicial tribunal, sums on 
account have been paid, amounting to $5,416.58. There were 6 of 
these cases, affecting 14.01 acres. 

On January 1, 1906, there was pending final action in 12 settle- 
ments which had been supposed to be effected, 2 of which had been 
made in 1901, 2 in 1903, 2 in 1904 and 6 in 1905. 

Inasmuch as on July 1, 1905, the time expired within which could 
be brought petitions for the determination of damages for the taking 
of water rights, where no land was taken in connection with such 
water rights, and for the determination of all other damages pro- 
vided for on account of the operations of the Board, except damages 
for real estate taken, new cases, to the number of 136, were brought 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOAED. 



13 



shortly previous to that date. Of these cases, 3 were for damages 
to mill property ; 6 were for the widening of Crescent Street in 
West Boylston ; 19 for damages to the intervale or meadow land 
on the Nashua River in Clinton, Bolton, Lancaster and Harvard; 
19 for damages to land by flooding in Germantown in Clinton ; 10 
for damages for discontinuance of roads in Clinton; 21 for depre- 
ciation and other damages in Boylston ; 4 for like damages in 
Sterling; 19 for damages for depreciation in West Boylston; 1 for 
blasting ; 2 for claims on account of the Worcester County Truant 
School ; and 1 the nature of which is not evident. 

Since the beginning of operations upon the Metropolitan Water 
Works, the number of settlements effected on account of the acqui- 
sition of land for the purposes of the Water Works, including the 
works of water supply acquired from the city of Boston on January 
1, 1898, has amounted to 851; and under them the Board has 
acquired rights, in fee or of easements, in 15,953.35 acres, or 
24.927 square miles, for which an aggregate of $16,921,753.86 has 
been paid. Only 44 of these cases have been settled by judgments 
of court, and the total amount paid under these judgments has been 
$139,207.29 or a little less than 1 per cent, of the whole amount paid. 

These purchases and takings for which the settlements have been 
made include lands taken in fee with the buildings thereon and the 
water and other rights connected therewith, and lands in which 
easements and other rights are taken ; but they do not include set- 
tlements for diversion of water, depreciation and other damages con- 
nected with lands not acquired, and in which no fee or easement has 
been taken. 

Summary of Land Settlements for Water Works to December 31, 1905. 



LOCATION. 



Wachusett Reservoir 
Berlin, 
Boylston, 
Clinton, 
Holden, 
Sterling, 
West Boylston 
Total, . 



For the Year 1905. 



Area in 
Acres. 



1.080 

55.750 
.729 



57.559 



Number 
of Settle- 
ments. 



> 9 



Payments. 



$6,015 00 



5,015 00 



From Beginning op Work. 



Area in 
Acres. 



Number 
of Settle- 
ments. 



Payments. 



16.700 

4,003.116 

1,274.763 

167.000 

770.237 

1,652.850 



7,884.666 



y 429 



429 



2,949,437 10 



$2,949,437 10 



II 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Summary of Land Settlements for Water Works, etc. — Continued. 



LOCATION. 



Improving Wachusett Water- 
shed. 

Ilolden 

West Boylstou, 

Total 

Wachusett Aqueduct. 
Berlin, 
Clinton, . 
Marlborough, 
Northborough, 
Bouthborough, 
Total, . 

Sudbury Reservoir. 2 
Marlborough, . 
Bouthborough, . 

Total, .... 

Improving Sudbury Water- 
shed. 

Ashland, . 

Marlborough, . 

Northborough, 

Bouthborough, . 

Westborough, . 

Total, . 

Clinton Sewerage System. 
Clinton, . 
Lancaster, 

Total 

Weston Aqueduct. 
Fraimngham, 
Newton, . 
Bouthborough, 
Wayland, . 
Weston, . 
Total, . 



Fok tub Yeah 1905. 



Area in 
Acres. 



Number 
of Settle- 
ments. 



Payments. 



67.040 



67.040 



1.240 
.987 

3.860 
11.253 



17.340 



$22,960 00 



$22,960 00 



> 1 



> 9 



$15,037 00 



$15,037 00 



Fhom Beginning op Work. 



Area in 
Acres. 



151.340 
64.430 



215.770 

47.815 
12.310 
61.530 
89.000 
100.060 



300.715 

751.980 
2,019.080 



2,771.060 



.630 
.800 

178.049 
4.826 

205.487 



389.792 

5.315 
129.835 



135.150 

102.125 

1.308 

.450 

73.299 

295.195 



Number 
of Settle- 
ments. 



Payments. 



y 68 



68 



153 



153 



J> 39 



39 



36 



36 



> 85 



472.377 



85 



$60,960 00 



$60,960 00 



$74,362 40 



$74,362 40 



$658,318 75 



$658,318 75 



$16,522 16 



$16,522 16 



$37,794 40 



$37,794 40 



$181,893 40 



$181,893 40 



1 $60,000 due on one settlement. 



2 Including settlements made by city of Boston. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



15 



Summary of Land Settlements for Water Works, etc. — Concluded. 











Fob the Year 1905. 


From Beginning 


or Work. 


LOCATION. 


Area in 
Acres. 


Number 
of Settle- 
ments. 


Payments. 


Area in 
Acres. 


Number 
of Settle- 
ments. 


Payments. 


Distribution System. 














Arlington, 








- 


1 




1.896 


1 




Boston, 








- 






1.359 


1 




Brookline, 








- 






.051 


1 




Maiden, 








- 






.158 






Medford, . 
Newton, . 








.817 


i 

> 4 


$3,496 77 


3.213 
5.147 


1 

> 34 


$171,916 85 


Quincy, . 








. 






5.224 






Revere, 








- 






.404 






Somerville, 








. 






.009 






Stoneham, 








- 


J 




19.409 


J 




Total, . 


.817 


4 


$3,496 77 


36.870 


34 


$171,916 85 


Improving Lake Cochituate. 














Natick 


- 


- 


- 


2.950 


1 


$1,600 00 


Total 


- 


- 




2.950 


1 


$1,600 00 


Boston Water Works 1 {taking 
of Jan. 1,1898). 


t 












Arlington, 








- 


1 




1.586 


1 




Ashland, . 








. 






652.124 


1 




Boston, 








- 






160.630 






Framingbam, 








. 






663.460 






Hopkinton, 








- 






654.729 






Marlborough, 








- 






30.552 






Medford, . 








- 






25.140 






Natick, . 








- 






436.223 






Needham, . 








_ 






31.695 






Newton, . 








- 


" 


— 


78.308 


> 1 


$12,768,948 80 2 


Sherborn, . 








- 






40.385 






Somerville, 








- 






12.426 






Sonthborough, . 








- 






17.168 






Way land, . 








. 






177.875 






Wellesley, 








- 






139.115 






Westborough, 








- 






545.912 






Winchester, 








- 






76.094 






Woburn, . 








- 


J 




.578 


J 




Total, . 


- 


- 


- 


3,744.000 


1 


$12,768,948 80 


Aggregates, 






142.756 


25 


$47,508 77 


15,953.350 


851 


$16,921,753 86 



1 Estimated areas. 



2 Includes interest. 



16 METROPOLITAN WATEB [Pub. Doc. 

The settlements above enumerated include all hinds acquired for 
which a complete settlement has been made. About Lid. 388 acres 
of the lands acquired and settled for have subsequently been sold 
and conveyed by the Hoard. 

The tables of settlements for lands acquired do not include : — 

1, Lands for which " payments on account" under chapter 317 
of the Acts of the year 1904 have been made, there being 14.01 
acres on account of which $5,416.58 has been paid. 

i > . Spot Pond and adjacent lands in Maiden, Medford and Mel- 
rose, comprising about 271.177 acres, exclusive of the area of land 
under Spot Pond which is not estimated, on account of which 
$342,820.68 has been paid. 

3. Lands acquired but not paid or settled for, amounting to 
about 163.309 acres, including 50.765 acres previously owned by 
the Commonwealth, and 66.761 acres of other lands for which no 
claims will probably be made. 

4. Lands embraced in the St. John's Catholic Cemetery, compris- 
ing 26.39 acres in Clinton and 69.75 acres in Lancaster. 

5. Street areas. 

The total area of land in which the Commonwealth has acquired 
for the Metropolitan Water Works either the fee, easements or 
other rights is about 16,575.422 acres, or about 2Q square miles. 

(5) Claims and Settlements for Loss of Business. 

For injury to business caused by the carrying out of the Metro- 
politan Water Act in the towns of Boylston and West Boylston and 
in portions of the towns of Sterling and Clinton, but one additional 
claim was filed. Settlements were made during the year in 23 cases. 
In some of these cases claims had been filed previous to the past 
year, but in the greater number no statements of claim had ever 
been filed with the Board, but suits for damages had been directly 
brought in court. These suits were brought after the decision of 
the Supreme Judicial Court in the case of Allen v. the Common- 
wealth, which declared that under certain circumstances farming 
was an established business within the meaning of the Metropolitan 
Water Act, for which damages could be recovered. Settlements 
were accordingly effected in several of these suits by the Attorney- 
General, with the approval of the Board. No claims were disallowed 
during the year. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 17 

The number of claims of this class settled since the beginning of 
the Water Works has been 305, and the total sum paid on account 
of such claims has been $149,897.36. All of these claims except 18 
have been settled outside of the court. 

(6) Claims and Settlements for Loss of Employment. 

No claims for loss of employment by residents of West Boylston 
have been filed during the year, and no settlements of cases of this 
class have been made. There are, however, pending in the courts 
two cases which the Board refused to allow. 

The whole number of settlements for such claims effected since 
the beginning of the operations of the Board have been 474. The 
total amount paid on account of these claims has been $85,884.65. 
All of these claims have been settled without resort to the courts. 

(7) Claims and Settlements for Depreciation of Real Estate. 

Settlements for depreciation in the value of real estate not taken 
by the Board were made on account of lands situated in the towns 
of West Boylston and Sterling only, all of the Clinton cases having 
been previously settled. Settlements have been effected in 17 cases 
of this class during the year ending December 31, 1905, and the sum 
of $14,089.72 has been paid. Of these, 2 were settled in the courts. 

The total number of claims for depreciation settled up to December 
31, 1905, has been 265, and the total amount paid thereunder has 
been $258,485.49. All of these claims except 41 were settled out 
of court. 

Many suits for damages have been brought under chapter 436 of 
the Acts of the year 1904, which provided that the owners of real 
estate situated in that part of the town of Boylston lying on the 
southerly and southeasterly sides of the reservoir and within the 
limits of the Nashua River watershed should have the riorht to 
recover for the depreciation in value of real estate not taken but 
injured by reason of the operations of the Metropolitan Water and 
Sewerage Board, in a manner similar to that provided for owners 
of real estate in the town of West Boylston. No settlements have 
yet been effected, and no trials have been reached in the pending 
suits. 



is METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

(8) Claims on Account of Diversion of Water, 
There have been no claims filed during the year for damages for 

the diversion of water. The total sum paid under settlements and 

judgments for such claims since the beginning of the construction 

of the Water Works has been $1,135,708.91. 

The sums enumerated as paid in these and in the preceding cases 

do not include amounts paid for expert services and court expenses. 

IV. WATER WORKS — MAINTENANCE. 

The maintenance and operation of the Water Works, with the 
exception of the Wachusett Reservoir and Aqueduct and the Clinton 
Sewerage Works, have been in charge of the Engineer of the Sud- 
bury and Distribution departments. He is assisted by Charles E. 
Haberstroh, who has the immediate supervision of the Sudbury and 
Cochituate works and of the portion of the Weston Aqueduct above 
the Weston Reservoir; by George E. Wilde, who has the immediate 
supervision of the Weston Reservoir and the remainder of the 
Weston Aqueduct and of all the reservoirs and pipe lines within the 
Metropolitan District; and by John W. Lynch, who has charge of 
the several pumping stations. The maintenance of the W r achusett 
Reservoir and Aqueduct has been in charge of the Engineer of the 
Dam and Reservoir Department. 

(1) Operation of Works. 

Maintenance in connection with the Water Works has embraced 
the care and operation of the Chestnut Hill high-service and low- 
service pumping stations; the Spot Pond, Arlington and West 
Roxbury pumping stations ; the Clinton sewerage pumping station 
and filter-beds at Clinton ; the Pegan Brook pumping station and 
filter-beds at Natick ; the Mystic pumping station at Medford ; the 
Wachusett Reservoir, Lake Cochituate, the Sudbury Reservoir, 
and the various smaller storage reservoirs in the Sudbury watershed ; 
the Marlborough filter-beds ; Spot Pond, Chestnut Hill. Reservoir, 
and the smaller distributing reservoirs in different portions of the 
District ; the Cochituate, Sudbury, Wachusett and Weston aque- 
ducts ; about 84 miles of distributing pipes ; as well as the various pipe 
yards, gate-houses, siphon and terminal chambers and other struc- 
tures connected with the several reservoirs and aqueducts, dwellings 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



19 



for attendants, and various other buildings used or held for operat- 
ing purposes. 

All of these works, with the exception of the Mystic pumping 
station, have been in active operation during the year. 

(2) Storage Reservoirs. 

The reservoirs of the Cochituate and Sudbury watersheds have 
normal capacities amounting to 15,858,500,000 gallons, though a 
somewhat larger amount of water is actually held by these reservoirs 
at the periods of maximum height of the water. These capacities 
are as follows : — 



Cochituate watershed : — 

Lake Cochituate, including Dudley Pond, 
Sudbury watershed : — 

Sudbury Reservoir, . 

Framingham Reservoir No. 1, 

Framingham Reservoir No. 2, 

Framingham Reservoir No. 3, 

Ashland Reservoir, . 

Hopkinton Reservoir, 

Whitehall Reservoir, 

Farm Pond, .... 



Gallons. 

2,242,400,000 

7,253,500,000 

287,500,000 

529,900,000 

1,183,500,000 

1,416,400,000 

1,520,900,000 

1,256,900,000 

167,500,000 



Total, 



15,858,500,000 



The new Wachusett Reservoir has a capacity of more than 63,- 
000,000,000 gallons. 

The quantity of water stored in all of the storage reservoirs, 
including the Wachusett Eeservoir, on January 1, 1905, was 15,638,- 
100,000 gallons. This quantity was increased by the early rainfalls 
in January by about 4,000,000,000 gallons. Subsequently the 
quantity was lessened until the spring rains came. By these rains 
the quantity was increased to a maximum, on May 1, of 33,708,- 
200,000 gallons. In the following four months there was a loss in 
storage of about 7,000,000,000 gallons. The early rains of Septem- 
ber, however, caused an increase of about 4,000,000,000 gallons, 
and at the end of the year the quantity stored was 28,971,900,000 
gallons, an excess of 13,333,800,000 gallons over the quantity in 
storage at the end of the preceding year. 

The Wachusett Reservoir contained, at the beginning of the year 
1905, 4,409,600,000 gallons of water, the water being 33 feet deep 



20 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

at the dam. The Largest quantity of water held in the reservoir was 
on April 28, when it contained 20,697,900,000 gallons, having a 
depth at the dam of (55.6 feet. There were 17,115,300,000 gallons 
in Btorage at the end of tin 4 year. An average of 2,309,000 gallons 
per day was discharged from the reservoir into the river below the 
dam, under the requirements of law, for the use of the Lancaster 
mills and others. Had there been a normal rainfall, especially dur- 
ing the earlier part of the year, when the larger part of water in 
storage is collected, a much greater quantity would have been stored. 

An average of 71,877,000 gallons per day was drawn from the 
Wachusett Reservoir and conveyed through the Wachusett Aqueduct 
into the Sudbury Reservoir. The Sudbury Reservoir was kept full 
or nearly full during the entire year, as w f ell as Framingham Reser- 
voir No. 3. The w r ater in the Sudbury Reservoir in part overflowed 
or was discharged through pipes into Framingham Reservoir No. 3, 
w r hich is situated directly below upon the river, and in part was dis- 
charged into the Weston Aqueduct. Water was drawn from Fram- 
ingham Reservoir No. 2 during periods amounting to 10 months ; 
from Ashland Reservoir during 6 months ; from Hopkinton Reser- 
voir during 6 months ; and from Whitehall Reservoir during a 
period of about 2 months. During all or parts of 15 days water 
was drawn from Framingham Reservoir No. 1 and discharged into 
Lake Cochituate. No water was drawn from Farm Pond for the 
use of the Metropolitan District during the year. 

Lake Cochituate was maintained at a high level during nearly all 
of the year, the lowest level reached being in November, when the 
surface of the water was about 6-J- feet below hi^h water. An aver- 
age of 15,313,000 gallons per day was drawn from the lake during 
the year. During the month of July 20,800,000 gallons were dis- 
charged from Dudley Pond into Lake Cochituate. The water from 
Dug Pond is received into the lake by an overflow pipe. 

It is estimated that the Spot Pond watershed yielded an average 
of 310,000 gallons per day, which was in addition to the quantity 
pumped into the pond. 

Near the Sudbury Dam a gravel driveway has been built over the 
northerly end of the dam to the head-house of the Weston Aqueduct, 
and unsightly places below the dam have been covered with loam. 
A large number of trees have been set out on the grounds, and 
slight repairs have been required on the retaining wall of the channel 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 21 

below the dam. At Lake Cochituate, and also at the Framingham 
and Ashland reservoirs and at Farm Pond, various repairs have been 
required on the buildings and gate-houses and in the masonry con- 
nected with the dams. 

(3) Distributing Reservoirs. 

The distributing reservoirs, being situated within the Metropoli- 
tan District, are maintained both for facilitating the distribution of 
water and affording protection in cases of emergency. They are 
usually kept filled, or nearly filled, with water. The Weston Reser- 
voir is included in the list of distributing reservoirs, as it contains a 
considerable quantity of water which is available for emergencies, 
although its particular purpose is that of an equalizing reservoir. 
The capacities of these reservoirs are as follows : — 

Capacity in 
Gallons. 

Spot Pond, 1,791,700,000 

Chestnut Hill Reservoir, 300,000,000 

Fells Reservoir, 41,400,000 

Mystic Reservoir, 26,200,000 

Waban Hill Reservoir, 13,500,000 

Forbes Hill Reservoir, 5,100,000 

Bear Hill Reservoir, . . . . . . . 2,450,000 

Arlington Standpipe, 550,000 

Forbes Hill Standpipe, 330,000 

Weston Reservoir, 200,000,000 

Total, 2,381,230,000 

The grounds about the Chestnut Hill Reservoir, Spot Pond, Fells, 
Mystic and Forbes Hill reservoirs are kept in an attractive condi- 
tion, and considerable expenditures have also to be made for the 
care of the driveways and shrubbery. There are many visitors to 
these grounds during the summer season, and the people are per- 
mitted to frequent them, subject to such regulations as are necessary 
for the purpose of keeping the grounds in proper order and pre- 
venting the pollution of the water. 

Considerable work has been required at the Chestnut Hill Reser- 
voir in the replacing and rebuilding of walks, and in the repairs 
and renewals for the various gate-houses. The water of the Mj^stic 
Reservoir was shut off, and the reservoir, for the first time in thir- 
teen years, was thoroughly cleaned. Other repairs of a minor 



22 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

nature have been required on various buildings and gate-houses con- 
nected with the various reservoirs. 

Mystic Lake, having a capacity of 380,000,000 gallons, is not now 
used for purposes of water supply, but is maintained in good repair, 

and its waters may bo used in case of emergency. The high-service 
reservoir in the city of Chelsea, by an arrangement made with the 
Water Commissioners of that city, may be used, if necessary, for 
supplying other cities and towns in the northern portion of the 
District. This reservoir has a capacity of 916,500 gallons. 

The steel cylindrical structure constituting the Arlington stand- 
pipe is not enclosed by any surrounding framework or barrier, and 
is entirely unprotected. Standing at the top of Arlington Heights, 
it is seen from a great distance in all directions. It not only lacks 
the protection which such a permanent structure should be afforded, 
but presents an unsightly appearance for an important public work. 
The Board has recommended to the Legislature of the present year 
an appropriation for enclosing the standpipe with a masonry tow r er. 

(4) Aqueducts. 

The Wachusett Aqueduct was in use 266 days during the year, 
and an average of 71,877,000 gallons per day was conveyed during 
the periods of its use to the Sudbury Reservoir. This aqueduct 
was closed for a thorough cleaning during 6 days. It has been the 
policy during the year to draw water from Lake Cochituate and 
the reservoirs on the Sudbury River when their supply is sufficient 
for the purpose and of acceptable quality, in order that the Wachu- 
sett Reservoir may be more speedily filled. 

The Sudbury Aqueduct was in operation 359 days, it being shut 
off during the remaining days of the year for cleaning. An average 
of 75,384,000 gallons per day w 7 as conveyed through the aqueduct 
and discharged principally into Chestnut Hill Reservoir, but at times 
water was discharged into pipes leading to the pumping station. 
Many of the manhole openings, which were built at intervals along 
the aqueduct for access, were reconstructed in part and improved. 

The Cochituate Aqueduct was in service on 249 days, and during 
the period when not in use the aqueduct was thoroughly cleaned. 
An average of 15,313,000 gallons per day was conveyed through the 
aqueduct, and, as in the Sudbury Aqueduct, discharged into the 
Chestnut Hill Reservoir or into pipes leading to the pumping station. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 23 

Several manholes have been improved in a manner similar to that 
which was adopted on the Sudbury Aqueduct. 

In the Weston Aqueduct the work of cutting out and pointing 
cracks, which had developed soon after construction, begun in the 
previous year, was completed. Trees have been set out at the reser- 
voir, and at one point dikes have been built in order to divert the 
water into a proper channel. The aqueduct was in use 302 days, 
and an average of 30,742,000 gallons per day was conveyed directly 
to the distributing pipes in the Metropolitan Water District. 

(5) Pumping Stations. 

About 75 per cent, of all the water supplied to the Metropolitan 
Water District has been pumped at the Chestnut Hill high-service 
and low-service stations. The remainder of the water is not pumped, 
but is delivered by gravity from the Weston Aqueduct into the main 
pipes of the Distributing System. The total quantity of water 
pumped at all the stations, amounting to 35,986,230,000 gallons, 
was 1,024,140,000 gallons more than during the preceding year. 
From the Chestnut Hill low-service pumping station the water is 
pumped to the lower districts of Boston, Somerville, Chelsea, Mai- 
den, Medford, Everett and Arlington, and also to Spot Pond. The 
water is pumped from the Chestnut Hill high-service station to the 
higher districts of Boston, Quincy, Watertown, Belmont and a part 
of Milton. Water is pumped a second time from Spot Pond to 
Melrose, Revere, Winthrop, Nahant, Swampscott and the higher 
portions of Somerville, Chelsea, Maiden, Medford and Everett, from 
a station in Arlington to Lexington and the higher portions of 
Arlington, and from a station in West Roxbury to the higher por- 
tions of West Roxbury and Milton. The quantity of water pumped 
in the Chestnut Hill low-service station was less than in the preced- 
ing year, but in all of the other stations there was an increase in the 
quantity, especially at the West Roxbury pumping station. At the 
latter station the increase was 26.2 per cent, over the preceding 
year. The quantity delivered from this station has become so great 
as nearly to equal the capacity of the station, and some action will 
soon be called for in order to give the requisite relief. 

The cost of operating the stations was $93,752.58, or $2,605 per 
million gallons pumped, which was 1 cent less than the cost during 
the preceding year. 



24 METROPOLITAN WATEB [Pub. Doc. 

The oosl per million gallons raised 1 foot was for the Chestnut 

Hill high- s or vice station $0,024, for the Chestnut Hill low-service 
station $0,031, for the Spot Pond pumping station $0,031, for the 
Wot Roxbury station $0,192, for the Arlington station $0. ()<)<;. 
These prices differ, decreasing accordingly as the quantities of water 
pumped increase. There has been a very slight decrease in the cost 
of fuel. A greater amount of repair work than usual has been re- 
quired at the Chestnut Hill high-service station, particularly on ac- 
count of repairs which have been necessary in the smaller and older 
engines. 

A contract has been made for a new pumping engine for the 
Arlington pumping station, and studies are in progress for the build- 
ing of a new station in place of the temporary building which has 
been used since 1899. 

Many tests have been made during the year in order to determine 
the qualities of the oils used at the various stations, and also to ascer- 
tain the heating power and values of all the kinds of coal which have 
been used. 

(6) Pipe Lines and Pipe Yards. 

But a single break occurred in the various pipe lines in operation 
throughout the District. This break, which occurred near the Chest- 
nut Hill low-service pumping station, was caused by uneven settle- 
ment of the ground, and was repaired without disturbance and at a 
very small expenditure. There have been discovered and repaired 
during the year 16 leaks, the most serious troubles occurring in the 
crossings of the Mystic and Charles rivers. For the repair of the 
pipes at the river crossings the services of a diver were required, but 
otherwise all of the labor has been performed by the emergency and 
repair forces of the Metropolitan Works. 

It has been necessary during the year to add two meters to the 
number of those, principally Venturi meters, which have been placed 
in the main pipe lines for the purpose of measuring the amounts 
of water supplied to the different cities and towns in the District. 
There are now in operation 56 of these meters. The operation and 
registration of these meters and maintenance in proper condition has 
required the care of two men. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 25 

(7) Sewerage and Filtration Works. 
(a) Clinton Sewerage Works. 
There was still a decrease in the amount of sewage received during 
the year at the Clinton Sewerage Works, about 97.000 gallons per 
day less being pumped and filtered than during the year 1904. 
Some of this decrease was undoubtedly due to the continued exten- 
sion of the metering of water services in Clinton, by which the waste 
of water has been checked ; but more is due to the comparatively 
small amount of water which has run in the river, and the consequent 
decrease in the amount entering leaky sewers which are located near 
the river. Experimentation has been continued during the year in 
methods of using the various filter-beds and caring for them. 
Although there was a considerable increase in the percentage of 
organic matter removed from the sewage, the character of the effluent 
from the filter-beds has remained about the same as in preceding 
years. Experiments will be continued for the purpose of increasing 
the efficiency of the system. 

(b) Marlborough Brook Filter-beds. 

The filter-beds at the head of' the Sudbury Reservoir, which have 
been built to receive the water from the brook flowing through the 
city of Marlborough, and also those built to receive the contents of 
the overflow sewer which has recently been built, have been in suc- 
cessful use during the year, and they have properly filtered all the 
water received except for a few hours on a single day in the month 
of January. The beds have been subjected to cleaning, and certain 
repairs and improvements in the system have been made. The water 
entering the reservoir has generally been satisfactorily purified by 
the filtration. 

(c) Pegan Brook Filtration Works. 

The filter-beds receiving the water of Pegan Brook, which is pol- 
luted by flowing through portions of the town of Natick, have been 
in operation during 202 days. The storage reservoirs built to 
receive the flow of the brook and of the intercepting ditch, together 
with the pumps, were sufficient, except on parts of 6 days, to dispose 
of all the waters coming from Pegan Brook and the intercepting 



26 METROPOLITAN WATEB [Pub, Doc. 

ditch which was duo- around the portion of Lake Cochituate adjacent 
to the Pegan Brook meadows. During the year 235,317,000 gallons 
of water were pumped from the reservoir on to the filter-beds. 

(8) Sanitary Work and Regulations. 

The genera] inspection of the Wachusett, Sudbury and Cochituate 
watersheds has continued to he exercised during the year under the 
supervision of William W. Locke, C.K., with two regular assistant- : 
and laborers and others have been employed from time to time to 
carry out the improvements and changes which have been ordered. 
The services of Dr. J, J. Goodwin of Clinton, who had for several 
years successfully inspected the camps and other buildings occupied 
by laborers in construction work, were dispensed with in the latter 
part of the year, on account of the near completion of the contract 
work at the Wachusett Reservoir. 

There w T ere no eases of infectious disease arising within the 
Wachusett Reservoir lands. There w r ere, however, some cases of 
typhoid fever within the limits of the Wachusett watershed. As 
soon as the cases were reported they were at once investigated, and 
measures w T ere taken by which no pollution should reach any stream 
entering the reservoir. There w r as a somewhat larger number of 
cases of typhoid fever in the Sudbury and Cochituate watersheds, 
but nothing occurred to endanger the purity of the water supply. 
It is an interesting fact that during the entire eight years of contract 
work upon the site of the Wachusett Reservoir very little sickness 
has developed among the laborers or their families, and there have 
been among them but 13 cases of typhoid fever during the entire 
period. This is the more notable inasmuch as there have been em- 
ployed on an average about 1,200 men during all this period of con- 
struction, and with many of these laborers have lived their families. 

On the Wachusett watershed there were inspected during the year 
1,452 premises, for the purpose of ascertaining whether there were 
any conditions which needed correction or improvement, the investi- 
gations being directed particularly to cesspools, privy and sink 
drainage, manure piles and manufacturing wastes. Of these, 1,257 
were declared satisfactory at the end of the year, and 195 unsatis- 
factory. Remedies were effected in 74 cases, and 13 cases were 
partially remedied, largely by the building of new cesspools and 
cemented vaults. On the Sudburv and Cochituate watersheds 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 27 

7,480 premises were inspected, and at the end of the year 7,119 were 
declared satisfactory, and 361 unsatisfactory. Remedy by sewer 
connection was obtained in 161 cases. There were remedied other- 
wise 10 premises; 61 premises were partially remedied; and 144 
cesspools were abandoned on account of the sewer connections. 
Much improvement has also been effected in both watersheds by the 
burning, tearing down or removal of old buildings. 

The various drainage ditches in these watersheds have been kept 
in good order and repair, and have been properly cleaned. 

It has been deemed proper to acquire by purchase one of the larger 
mill properties situated on the Quinepoxet River in that portion of 
the town of Holden lying near the reservoir, and two or three other 
small mills, the situation of which was such as particularly to endan- 
ger the quality of the water supply, have also been acquired. 

A new sanitary census of all the watersheds, which had been begun 
in the year 1904, was completed during the past year. There appear 
to be in the Wachusett watershed, embracing an area of 118.31 
square miles, 1,658 dwellings and other occupied buildings, 102 
vacant buildings and 273 summer cottages ; and upon this area there 
is a permanent population of 5,772, and a summer population of 
1,900 in addition. The permanent population is 49 per square mile, 
and the total combined permanent and summer population is 65 per 
square mile. 

Upon the Sudbury watershed, having an area of 75.20 square 
miles, there are 4,607 occupied buildings and 303 vacant buildings, 
with a total population of 21,131, of whom 10,575 occupy dwellings 
not connected with sewers. This area has a population per square 
mile of 281, and the population per square mile in dwellings not 
connected with sewers is 141. 

On the Cochituate watershed, having an area of 19.84 square miles, 
there are 2,873 occupied buildings and 74 vacant buildings, and 
there is a population of 15,508, of whom 6,521 occupy dwellings 
not connected with sewers. The population per square mile is 782, 
and the population occupying dwellings not connected with sewers 
is 329 per square mile. The figures above given for the Cochituate 
watershed do not include 71 small cottages and camps on the shores 
of Lake Cochituate, with a population of 214 on August 1, 1905. 

Beside the regular examination of samples of water collected 
from the various points on the works, made by the State Board of 



METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Health, collections of samples are made weekly from many points, 
and these are examined by the biological force of the Board micro- 
scopically, and for color, odor, taste and turbidity. During the year 
2,595 microscopical and 604 bacterial examinations were thus made. 

Boating and fishing in Lake CocHituate have so increased within 
the past few years that the Board has felt compelled to take some 
action for the preservation of the purity of the water. Although 
a margin around the lake is owned by the Commonwealth, this 
margin is narrow, and cottages are built in close proximity to the 
lake. The number of these cottages has greatly increased even 
during the past year. The attention of buyers has been publicly 
called to small lots laid out for sale, and propositions have been made 
tor the establishment of large recreation and picnic grounds in the 
immediate vicinity of the lake. Land adjacent to the margins has 
also been more and more leased for short periods to campers, who 
erect tents and adopt practices which are far from sanitary in their 
nature. These various inducements held out were attracting to the 
lake persons coining largely from places outside of the immediate 
neighborhood. 

As water for the supply of the Metropolitan District is drawn from 
the northern division of the lake, the section situated north of the 
county road known as Lake Avenue, and is delivered from the aque- 
duct for a portion of the time directly into the distributing pipes of 
the District, the Board determined it to be necessary to prohibit, on 
and after January 1, 1906, boating and fishing in this division of 
the lake. 

It has, however, been the desire of the Board that the remainder 
of the lake should still be used for boating and fishing by those 
having permanent cottages about the lake, and the neighboring resi- 
dents, so far as is consistent with the preservation of the purity of 
the water. Provision has been made for the registration of all boats 
wdiich shall be used upon the lake, in order that they may be brought 
more under the observation and supervision of the agents of the 
Board. Licenses are also to be issued for the use of the boats thus 
registered ; and beginning with the year 1906 boating is to be per- 
mitted only for the season extending from April 1 to September 20, 
inclusive. The limit in number of boats to be registered has been 
fixed at 125, and in the registration of the boats consideration is to 
be given to the question of the residence of the applicant, whether in 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOAED. 29 

the neighborhood of the lake or otherwise, and of his ownership 
of a cottage or permanent camp now existing. 

Applications for registration of boats are to be made to the Assist- 
ant Superintendent of the Metropolitan Water Works at South 
Framingham, for which blanks are furnished by the Board. It is 
required that the applicant shall state the character of the boat, its 
length, color, name, if any, and the owner's name, residence and 
post-office address, and the place where the boat is to be kept. He 
is also to state the names, residence and relationship to the owner 
of the persons to whom he desires licenses to be given for the use of 
the boat, the licenses to be limited to the owners and immediate 
members of their families. It is provided that the boat when used 
shall be in charge of one of the licensees, and shall not be let or be 
used for the carrying of passengers for compensation. A fee of $1 
is required for registration, and the owner receives a plate bear- 
ing a number, which must be attached to the boat in such position 
as required by the agent of the Board, and which must always be 
kept in sight. Registration is, of course, revokable by the Board in 
case of any violation of the rules or requirements of the Board. 

Fishing is permitted during the season above mentioned, in the 
sections of the lake situated squtherly from Lake Avenue, in boats 
which have been duly registered and numbered and are used in 
accordance with the requirements of the Board. Permission is also 
given to enter from the highway and fish in the lake during the same 
season, and to enter from the highway and fish through the ice in 
the same portion of the waters of the lake at other seasons. 

The Board trusts that with the adoption of such measures the lake 
may be used by those who should more properly be entitled to the 
use, in a manner which shall not injure the purity of the water as a 
source of water supply. 

(9) Quality of the Water. 

The quality of the water has been satisfactory and has been sub- 
stantially the same as for the preceding two years. At times, par- 
ticularly in the autumn, microscopic organisms were found more 
than usually abundant in one or another of the reservoirs, and the 
water has at times acquired a somewhat more noticeable taste and 
odor, although these organisms have not been at all injurious to the 
public health. There has been little or no complaint from water 



30 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

takers during the year. With the filling of the Wachusett Reservoir 
and the opportunity afforded for Longer storage, it is anticipated 
that there will be in the near future a still greater improvement in 
the quality of the water. 

(10) The Watbb Supply. 

Owing to the small rainfall, especially at the season of the year 
when water is collected in the reservoirs, the yield of the various 
watersheds has been very small in comparison with that of the pre- 
ceding years. The total rainfall on the Sudbury watershed was 3.78 
inches below the average, and the yield of the watershed was 26 per 
cent, below the average of the preceding thirty years. The rain- 
fall on the Wachusett watershed w T as 5.77 inches below the average, 
and the yield of the watershed was also 27 per cent, less than the 
average of the preceding eight years during which records have been 
kept. 

Water was supplied during the year to all of the cities and towns 
embraced within the Metropolitan Water District, except the city of 
Newton and the town of Hyde Park. Water was also supplied to 
the town of Swampscott, which is without the limits of the District, 
by a special agreement made with that town ; and a small part of the 
town of Saugus is supplied by the town of Revere, under an arrange- 
ment with the Board. The estimated population, as of July 1, 
1905, supplied with w r ater was 902,090. The town of Revere w T as 
supplied with water by the Revere Water Company until April 1, 
1905, at which time the town acquired the w r orks of water supply, 
and since that date the town has directly supplied its inhabitants. 

The city of Newton and the town of Hyde Park have as yet made 
no application for a supply of water, and, the Board being of the 
opinion that these municipalities have not reached the safe capac- 
ities of their own sources of supply in a dry year, they have been 
charged, in accordance with the Metropolitan Water Act, but one- 
sixth of the entire assessment which they would have been called 
upon to pay had they received a w 7 ater supply from the Metropolitan 
sources. 

The water supplied by the Metropolitan Water System to the 
various cities and towns amounted to a total of 43,215,210,000 gal- 
lons, an average daily supply of 118,398,000 gallons, and a daily 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 31 

average of 131 gallons for each inhabitant. The city of Newton and 
the town of Hyde Park supplied from their own sources to their 
respective inhabitants a total of 1,194,567,400 gallons, being a daily 
average of 63 gallons per inhabitant. 

The city of Cambridge again made a request for a temporary sup- 
ply of water, on account of its inability to obtain a sufficiency of 
proper water for domestic purposes from its own works. The city 
was proceeding with proper diligence in the laying of a new pipe 
line to relieve its necessities ; but, the season being much drier than 
could have been anticipated, it had become impossible for the city 
to obtain a sufficient supply for the time being from its own works 
without lowering Fresh Pond to such an extent as to threaten the 
public health. The evidence of physicians and experts was pre- 
sented to the Board, showing that the health of the inhabitants of 
that city would be seriously menaced if the water continued to be 
drawn from the pond without reinforcement from other sources. 
Although the city of Cambridge had not obtained any legislation, as 
had been expected, by which the temporary furnishing of water 
should be authorized by statute in case of emergency, the Board 
reached the opinion that the situation was so dangerous that it would 
not be justified in refusing to grant still another temporary supply, 
particularly as no injury or detriment could come to the Metropoli- 
tan District thereby. Accordingly, 269,170,000 gallons of water 
were furnished to that city from August 4 to September 6, the 
water being supplied at such times and in such quantities as the 
Board determined, and subject to the same limitations and restric- 
tions as applied to the cities and towns of the Metropolitan Water 
District. The Board received for this temporary supply the sum 
of $13,458.50. 

The town of Wakefield was compelled for about a week in the 
month of October to suspend the operation of its works for the pur- 
pose of making necessary changes and repairs, and for this purpose 
4,000,000 gallons of water were supplied to that town. Arrange- 
ments have also been made for supplying water to the United States 
Government reservation on Peddock's Island, through pipes which 
are laid to the island from Hough's Neck and across Nut Island in 
Quincy, and during the past year there were so supplied 1,608,000 
gallons. 



METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



V. WATER WORKS — FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

The Metropolitan Water Loans authorized for the construction 
and acquisition of works have amounted to $40,000,000. To this 
sum are added the proceeds from the sale of certain property by the 
Board, and these amounted on January 1, 1906, to $123,765.50. 
The total amount, therefore, which the Board lias been authorized to 
expend is $40,123,765.50. The amount of expenditures approved 
by the Board for payment out of the Metropolitan Water Loan Fund 
was, for the year 1905, $655,958.47 ; and the total amount so ap- 
proved for payment since the beginning of the work up to January 
1, 1906, has been $39,044,214.23. There was accordingly a balance 
remaining at the beginning of the year amounting to $1,079,551.27. 

The Treasurer of the Commonwealth has issued from time to time, 
on the request of the Board, bonds to the amount of $39,150,000. 
These bonds w r ere issued for terms of 39% and 40 years from 
the date of issue, and bear interest at the rate of 3 per cent, and 
3% per cent, per annum. The sinking fund established for the 
payment of the bonds at maturity amounted on January 1, 1906, to 
$4,207,045.69. 

The amount approved by the Board for the maintenance and opera- 
tion of the Water Works for the year 1905, which w r as paid out of 
the annual assessments, was $318,677.57. 

The assessments for the year 1905 for the payment of interest on 
the bonds, for the sinking fund requirements, and for the expenses 
of operation and maintenance of the Water Works, which w r ere 
levied upon the various cities and towns in the Metropolitan Dis- 
trict, amounted to $2,177,586.39. 

Receipts from sales of water to municipalities not belonging to 
the District and to water companies were distributed back to the cities 
and towns, in proportion to their respective assessments, to the 
amount of $19,764.25. 

The detailed financial statement regarding the Metropolitan Water 
Works is as follows : — 

(1) Metropolitan Water Loans, Receipts and Payments. 

The loans for the construction and acquisition of the Metropolitan 
Water Works, the receipts which are added to the proceeds of 
these loans, the expenditures for the construction and acquisition 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



33 



of works, and the balance available on January 1, 1906, have been 
as follows : — 



Loan under chapter 488 of the Acts of 1895, . 
Loan under chapter 453 of the Acts of 1901, . 



. $27,000,000 00 
. 13,000,000 00 



$40,000,000 00 
Proceeds from the sales of property applicable to the construction 
and acquisition of works (of which $28,194.65 is for the year 
1905) 123,765 50 



$40,123,765 50 
Amount approved by the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board 
for payments to December 31, 1905 (of which $655,958.47 is for 
the year 1905), 39,044,214 23 



Balance January 1, 1906, 



$1,079,551 27 



(2) Issues of Meteopolitan Water Loan Bonds. 
The Treasurer of the Commonwealth, under the authority given 
him to issue from time to time, on the request of the Board, 
negotiable bonds to an amount not exceeding $40,000,000, to be 
designated the "Metropolitan Water Loan," has sold bonds as 
follows : — 



Date of Sale. 



Amount 

of Bonds 

Bold. 



Rate of In- 
terest (per 
cent.). 


Price 
received. 


Date due. i 


3^ 


110.67 


Julyl, 1935, 


3K 


106.76268 


Julyl, 1935, 


z% 


107.82 


Julyl, 1935, 


z% 


113.176 


Jan.l, 1938, 


3K 


112.877 


Jan. 1, 1938, 


3 


100.64 


Julyl, 1939, 


3 


102.78 


Julyl, 1939, 


3 


102.155 


Jan. 1, 1941, 


3 


100.375 


Jan. 1, 1941, 


3 


100.10 


Jan. 1, 1941, 


3 


100.25 


Jan.l, 1941, 


3 


100.25 


Jan. 1, 1941, 


3 


100.50 


Jan. 1, 1941, 


3 


100.10 


Jan. 1, 1941, 


3 


100.25 


Jan. 1, 1941, 


3^ 


106.71 


Jan. 1, 1941, 


3 


100. 


Jan. 1, 1941, 


3 


100. 


Jan. 1, 1941, 


3K 


109.13 


Jan. 1, 1942, 


3K 


109.13 


Jan. 1, 1942, 


3% 


106.725 


Jan. 1, 1943, 


3% 


106.1329 


Jan. 1, 1943, 


3^ 


104.60 


Jan. 1, 1943, 


3^ 


104.60 


Jan.l, 1944, 


3K 


105.761 


Jan. 1, 1945, 



Premium. 



Sept 

Nov. 

Feb. 

Jan. 

Mar. 

June 15 

June 28 

Mar. 

July 

July 

July 

July 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Feb. 

Feb. 

April 



April 17 
Jan. 15 
Jan. 15 
Mar. 24 



, 1895, 
, 1896, 
, 1897, 
, 1898, 
, 1898, 
, 1899, 
, 1900, 
, 1901, 
, 1901, 
, 1901, 
, 1901, 
, 1901, 
, 1901, 
, 1901, 
, 1901, 
, 1901, 
, 1901, 
, 1901, 
, 1902, 
, 1902, 
, 1903, 
, 1903, 
, 1904, 
, 1904, 
, 1905, 



$5,000,000 

2,000,000 

6,000,000 

2,000,000 

2,000,000 

3,000,000 

1,000,000 

3,000,000 

100,000 

150,000 

205,000 

50,000 

50,000 

300,000 

200,000 

3,100,000 

1,345,000 

1,500,000 

500,000 

3,000,000 

250,000 

1,250,000 

500,000 

2,000,000 

650,000 



$39,150,000 



$533,500 00 

135,253 60 ! 

469,200 00 

263,520 00 

257,540 00 

19,200 00 

27,800 00 

64,650 00 

375 00 

150 00 

512 50 

125 00 

250 00 

300 00 

500 00 

208,010 00 



45,650 00 

273,900 00 

16,812 50 

76,661 25 

23,000 00 

92,000 00 

37,446 50 

$2,546,356 35 



1 Including $18,673.60 from readjustment of rate made by the Treasurer in 1897. 



;u 



MKTROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



< 3 ) Metropolitan Water Loan Sinking Fund. 
The sinking fund established by the Treasurer of the Common- 
wealth has amounted at the end of each year to sums as follows: — 



December 81, 
December SI, 

December 81, 

December 31, 
December 31, 
December 31, 
December SI, 
December 31, 
December 31, 
December 31, 
December 31, 



1895, 
1896, 
1S97, 

1898, 
1899, 
1900, 
1901, 
1902, 
1903, 
1904, 
1905, 



$226,286 05 

699,860 70 

954,469 00 

1,416,1374 29 

1,349,332 97 

1,573,619 72 

1,662,426 95 

2,256,803 81 

2,877,835 59 

3,519,602 92 

4,207,045 69 



(4) Annual Assessments and Receipts. 
Assessments for the year, amounting to $2,177,586.39, were re- 
quired for the payment of the interest on the bonds issued by the 
Commonwealth, the sinking fund requirements and the expenses of 
operation and maintenance of the Water Works. The requirements 
were : for interest, $1,335,393.91 ; for the sinking fund, $513,- 
568.32; and for maintenance and operation, $328,624.16. These 
assessments were made by the Treasurer of the Commonwealth upon 
the various municipalities as follows : — 



Arlington, 
Belmont, 
Boston, . 
Chelsea, . 
Everett, . 
Hyde Park, 
Lexington, 
Maiden, . 
Medford, 
Melrose, . 
Milton, . 



$13,486 46 

6,637 30 

1,758,635 00 

46,418 14 

35,081 32 

3,256 77 

6,679 80 

49,720 51 

28,631 54 

20,478 53 

16,580 60 



Nahant, . 
Newton, . 
Quincy, . 
Revere, . 
Somerville, 
Stoneham, 
Watertown, 
Winthrop, 



$3,699 67 
10,699 51 
35,832 50 
16,412 09 
90,560 73 
8,662 33 
15,689 53 
10,424 06 

$2,177,586 39 



The comparatively smaller sums assessed upon the city of Newton 
and the tow r n of Hyde Park were owing to the fact that neither of 
these municipalities had reached the safe capacity of its sources, and 
had been furnished w r ith water. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWEKAGE BOAED. 



35 



The proceeds from the operations of the Board, exclusive of the 
proceeds from sales of property, are, in accordance with the pro- 
visions of the Water Act, applied to the reduction of the assessment, 
and these, for the year 1905, amounted to $7,708.27. 

The actual expenditures for the maintenance and operation of the 
Metropolitan Water Works were, for the year 1905, $318,677.57. 

(5) Distribution to Cities and Towns of Sums received from 
Water furnished to Other Municipalities. 

Sums have been received during the year 1905, under the pro- 
visions of the Metropolitan Water Act, for water furnished, as 
follows : — 



Cambridge, .... 
Framingham Water Company, 

Revere, 

Revere Water Company, 
Swampscott, .... 



$28,458 50 


387 10 


164 25 


54 75 


4,600 00 


$33,664 6.0 



The Treasurer, in accordance with the requirements of the Act, 
distributed to the cities and towns of the District, in proportion to 
the annual assessments theretofore contributed by them, a part of 
this amount, as follows : — 



Arlington, 

Belmont, 

Boston, 

Chelsea, 

Everett, 

Hyde Park, 

Lexington, 

Maiden, 

Medford, 

Melrose, 

Milton, 



$114 55 


59 


09 


16,163 59 


423 


38 


305 


70 


28 


76 


28 


28 


436 


91 


256 


94 


185 45 


72 


27 



Nahant, 


|32 78 


Newton, 


96 71 


Quincy, 


316 39 


Revere, 


141 79 


Somerville, 


809 65 


Stoneham, . 


64 60 


Watertown, 


139 39 


Winthrop, . 


88 02 



|19,764 25 



(6) Expenditures for the Different Works. 
The following is a summary of the expenditures made in the 
various operations for the different works : — 



36 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc, 



CONSTKI'CTION AND ACQUISITION OF 

WOKKS. 



Administration applicable to all parts of the 
construction and acquisition of the works, 



W:\ihii.-ett Dam and Rose 
Wachusett Dam, 
North Dike, 
South Dike, . 
Removal of soil, 
Relocation of railroads, 
Roads and bridges, . 
Real estate, 
Damages, real estate n 

and loss of wages, 
Other expenses, 



voir 



ot taken, 



business 



Improving Wachusett watershed, 
Wachusett Aqueduct, 
Sudbury Reservoir, . 
Protection of Sudbury supply, . 
Improving Sudbury watershed, 
Protection of Cochituate supply, 
Improving Cochituate watershed, 
Improving Lake Cochituate, 
Pipe lines, Dam No. 3 to Dam No 
Pipe line, Rosemary siphon, 
Weston Aqueduct : — 

Aqueduct, .... 

Reservoir, .... 

8upply pipe lines, . 

Real estate, taxes and other expenses, 

Distribution system : — 
Low service : — 

Pipe lines and connections, 

Pumping station, Chestnut Hill, 

Reservoir, Spot Pond,. 

Gate-house and connections, Chestnut 
Hill Reservoir 

Real estate and other expenses, 
Northern high service: — 

Pipe lines and connections, 

Spot Pond pumping station, 

Fells Reservoir, Stoneham, 

Bear Hill Reservoir, Stoneham, . 

Real estate and other expenses, . 
Southern high service : — 

Pipe lines and connections, . 

Pumping station, Chestnut Hill, 

Forbes Hill Reservoir, Quincy, . 

Waban Hill Reservoir, Newton, 

Real estate and other expenses, . 

Amounts carried forward, 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1905. 



$199,492 43 
2,219 85 
19,755 53 
153,361 43 
39,088 55 
44,721 28 
40,559 83 

24,701 08 
1,090 70 



$33,952 35 

4,847 31 

317 86 

18,969 97 



$4,100 77 



5,124 86 



$12,595 94 



524,990 68 
7,164 86 
3,362 58 



352 35 



58,087 49 



From Beginning of Work 
to December 31, 1905. 



$2,182,644 42 
749,508 30 
135,296 84 
2,491,419 39 
860,789 32 
529,196 63 
3,181,630 38 

494,267 50 
6,472 92 



$2,349,963 12 
288,302 10 
584,351 78 
203,121 21 



$1,751,205 67 
459,251 97 
678,101 58 

65,480 88 
90,910 66 

440,539 28 

291,829 35 

141,392 94 

38,267 70 

14,838 05 

509,546 41 

242,121 35 

90,003 49 

61,592 11 

10,226 36 



$251,674 69 



10,631,225 60 

66,089 67 

1,793,600 20 

2,922,445.21 

128,797 06 

95,106 93 

9,000 00 

8,860 68 

103,537 29 

48,471 48 

23,142 98 



3,425,738 21 



$9,225 63 $606,553 90 $4,785,306 80 $19,507,690 00 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



37 



Construction and Acquisition op 


For the Year ending 


From Beginning of Work^ 


Works. 


December 31, 1905. 


to December 31, 1905. 


Amounts brought forward, . 


$9,225 63 


$606,553 90 


$4,785,306 80 $19,507,690 00 


Distribution system — Con. 










Northern extra high service, .... 


76 68 




14,028 15 




Southern extra high service, .... 


- 




22,815 67 




Meters and connections 


1,495 72 




76,397 00 




Improving Spot Pond Brook, 


- 




3,717 05 




Glenwood pipe yard 


- 




33,100 59 




Chestnut Hill pipe yard 


- 


10,798 03 


11,311 26 


4,946,676 52 


Diversion of water, South Branch of Nashua 








379 69 




1,357,811 00 


Acquisition of existing water works : — 










Reimbursement city of Boston, partially 










constructed Sudbury Reservoir, 


- 




$1,157,921 59 




To Boston, for works taken Jan. 1, 1898, 


- 




12,768,948 80 




To Maiden, Medford and Melrose (on ac- 










count) for taking of Spot Pond, 


- 




343,570 39 




To Newton, for Waban Hill Reservoir, 






60,000 00 




Transfers of works acquired and other prop- 


$14,330,440 78 




erty to accounts for special works, . 


" 




1,240,221 94 






$13,090,218 84 




Engineering, conveyancing, etc., . 




36,711 68 


70,526 22 


13,160,745 06 






Pipes, Valves, Castings, etc., sent First to 










Storage Yards, and afterwards transferred 










as needed to Different Parts of the Work. 










Sent to storage yards, 


$2,033 47 




$2,086,469 96 




Transferred from storage yards to works, and 










included in costs above, 


518 30 


1,515 17 

$655,958 47 


2,015,178 31 


71,291 65 


Total for constructing and acquiring of 




\ 


539,044,214 23 



1 Of the total expenditures from the beginning of the work, the sum of $149,432.86 is for Clinton 
sewerage system. 



Maintenance and Operation. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1905. 



Administration, 

General supervision, .... 
Taxes and other expenses, 
Wachusett Reservoir Department : — 

General superintendence, 

Sanitary inspection, 

Buildings, 

Reservoir, 



Amount carried forward, 



$424 52 

1,787 15 

1,519 02 

10,289 13 



$11,005 91 

4,431 40 

29,897 73 



14,019 82 



$59,354 86 






METROPOLTTAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Maintenance and Opeuation. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1905. 



Amount brought forward, 

\V;u'luit»t>tt Dam and Aqueduct Department: — 

General superintendence 

Dam and aqueduct, 

(.'Ilntou sewerage system : — 

Pumping station, 

Sowers, screens and filter-beds, . 
Sanitary inspection, 

Sudbury Department: — 
General superintendence, .... 
Superintendence, Framingham office, . 

Ashland Reservoir, 

Hopkinton Reservoir, 

Whitehall Reservoir, 

Framingham Reservoirs, 1, 2 and 3, 

Sudbury Reservoir, 

Lake Cochituate, 

Marlborough Brook filters 

Pegan filters, 

Sudbury and Cochituate watersheds, . 

Sanitary inspection 

Cochituate Aqueduct, 

Sudbury Aqueduct, 

Weston Aqueduct, 

Biological laboratory, 



Distribution Department : — 

Superintendence 

Arlington pumping station, pumping service 

Chestnut Hill low-service pumping station, pumping service, . 
Chestnut Hill high-service pumping station, pumping service, 
Spot Pond pumping station, pumping service, . . . 
West Roxbury pumping station, pumping service, . 

Arlington standpipe 

Bear Hill Reservoir, 

Chelsea Reservoir, 

Chestnut Hill Reservoir, 

Fells Reservoir 

Forbes Hill Reservoir, 

Mystic Lake, conduit and pumping station, .... 

Mystic Reservoir 

Waban Hill Reservoir, 

Weston Reservoir, 

Spot Pond, 

Buildings at Spot Pond, 

Pipe lines : — 

Low service, 

Northern high service, 

Southern high service, 

Supply pipe lines 

Amounts carried forward, 



$1,225 
8,970 

2,582 

2,924 

1 



$3,978 

6,970 

2,044 

2,260 

280 

4,749 

5,196 

3,551 

2,928 

2,598 

901 

2,460 

5,678 

10,720 

15,619 

2,730 



$10,745 

5,880 

32,279 

37,298 

11,029 

6,916 

1 

109 

7 

9,118 

730 

1,181 

2,235 

2,016 

472 

1,725 

12,499 

524 

10,928 

4,508 

2,885 

779 



$59,354 86 



15,703 81 



r2,666 85 



$153,875 64 $147,725 52 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



39 



Maintenance and Operation. 



For the Tear ending 
December 31, 1905. 



Amounts brought forward, 

Distribution Department — Con. 
Buildings at Chestnut Hill, . 
Chestnut Hill pipe yard, 
Glenwood pipe yard and buildings, 

Stables, 

Waste prevention 

Venturi meters, .... 



Total for maintaining and operating works, 



,875 64 $147,725 52 

1,456 76 

963 04 

4,118 43 

4,698 57 

2,583 57 

3,256 04 
170,952 05 



$318,677 57 



(7) Detailed Financial Statement under Metropolitan 

Water Act. 

The Board herewith presents, in accordance with the require- 
ments of the Metropolitan Water Act, a detailed statement of the 
expenditures and disbursements, receipts, assets and liabilities for 
the year 1905. 

(a) Expenditures and Disbursements. 

The total amount of the expenditures and disbursements on ac- 
count of construction and acquisition of works for the year beginning 
January 1, 1905, and ending December 31, 1905, is $655,958.47; 
and the total amount from the time of the organization of the Met- 
ropolitan Water Board, July 19, 1895, to December 31, 1905, is 
$39,044,214.23. 

For maintenance and operation the expenditures for the year 
have been $318,677.57, and from the beginning of the work, 
$2,231,214.01. 

The salaries of the commissioners, and other expenses of admin- 
istration, have been apportioned to the construction of the works 
and to the maintenance and operation of the same, and appear under 
each of those headings. 

The following is a division of the expenditures according to their 
general character : — 



40 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



General Character op Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1905. 



From Beginning of Work 
to December 31, 1905. 



Construction of Works and Acquisition 
by Purchase or Taking. 

Administration. 
Commissioners, . 
Secretary and auditor, 
Clerks and stenographers, 
Legal services, 
Travelling, . 
Stationery and printing, 
Postage, express and telegrams, 
Furniture and fixtures, 
Alterations and repairs of buildings, 
Telephone, lighting, heating, water and 

of building, . 
Rent and taxes, main office, 
Miscellaneous expenses, . 



Engineering . 
Chief engineer and department engineers, 
Principal assistant engineers, 
Engineering assistants, 
Consulting engineers, . 

Inspectors 

Architects, .... 
Railroad and street car travel, 
Wagon hire, 
Stationery and printing, 
Postage, express and telegrams, 
Engineering and drafting instruments 

tools, 

Engineering and drafting supplies, . 
Books, maps and photographic supplies, 
Furniture and fixtures, 
Alterations and repairs of buildings : — 

Main office, 

Sub-offices 

Telephone, lighting, heating, water and care 
of buildings : — 

Main office, 

Sub-offices 

Rent and taxes, — main office, . 
Rent of sub-offices and other buildings, 
Field offices and sheds, 
Clinton office building, 

Unclassified supplies 

Miscellaneous expenses, 



and 



Amounts carried forward, 



$4,666 66 
1,601 92 
3,283 98 

181 99 

1,510 11 

64 60 

147 45 



617 69 
420 00 
101 54 



$9,302 24 

8,434 65 

38,431 62 

123 00 
8,290 55 
2,671 14 

129 04 
1,083 89 

669 21 

122 51 

15 00 
587 67 
256 15 
100 49 

1 50 
78 29 



1,968 71 
1,002 14 
1,260 00 



35 57 
82 06 



$12,595 94 



74,645 43 



$87,241 37 



$105,643 58 

45,717 03 

52,508 13 

2,359 00 

3,591 08 

10,182 09 

2,627 97 

4,280 89 

5,743 27 

10,355 63 
4,275 80 
4,390 22 



$202,410 23 

145,225 49 

984,705 40 

23,560 07 

289,645 89 

35,199 53 

26,735 19 

43,856 85 

25,466 29 

7,575 36 

19,240 73 

24,504 15 

6,625 59 

14,977 46 

13,939 86 
2,938 36 



21,827 39 
18,449 16 
12,595 75 
4,513 74 
1,274 49 
9,866 87 
8,211 10 
8,534 27 



$251,674 69 



1,951,879 22 
$2,203,553 91 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



41 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1905. 



From Beginning of Work 
to December 31, 1905. 



Amounts brought forward, 

Construction. 
Preliminary work (borings, test pits and other 
investigations) : — 

Advertising, 

Other preliminary,work as given in detail in 
preceding annual report, . 

Contracts, Wachusett Reservoir: — 

Contracts completed and final payments 
made prior to January 1, 1905, . 

Busch Bros., excavating soil, Sect. 6, and 
building road, West Boylston and Boyl- 
ston, — $600 due, deducted from estimate, 
September 5, 1900 

Newell & Snowling Construction Co., build- 
ing a part of Newton Street and improv- 
ing Crescent Street, West Boylston, . 

Then. Gore Co., surfacing highways, West 
Boylston, Sect. 1, 

The H. Gore Co., surfacing highways, West 
Boylston, Sect. 2 

Bruno, Salomone & Petitti, Sect. 10, Wachu- 
sett Reservoir, Boylston and West Boyl- 
ston 

McArthur Bros. Co., building Sect. 2 of the 
relocation of Central Massachusetts Rail- 
road, 

Francis A. McCauliff, masonry arch bridge 
at West Boylston 

McBride & Co., Stillwater improvement, 
Sundry bills paid under this contract, 

John F. Magee & Co., South Dike, 

McArthur Bros. Co., riprap at South Dike, 

McArthur Bros. Co., Wachusett Dam, 

Gibby Foundry Co., castings for Wachusett 
Dam, 

Connery & Wentworth, superstructure of 
lower gate-chamber of the Wachusett 
Dam 

American Tube Works, brass tubing for 
railing at Wachusett Dam, .... 

Contracts completed, Wachusett Aqueduct, . 
Contracts completed, Sudbury Reservoir, 
Contracts completed, protection Sudbury 

Supply : — 
City of Marlborough, main sewer, 
Contracts completed, improving Lake Cochit- 

uate 

Amounts carried forward, 



$117 67 
75 



$4,812 25 
6,457 27 
8,058 67 

92,884 65 

25,850 05 



23,314 67 

3,163 05 

19,854 09 

15,385 24 

135,449 26 

1,331 10 



16,966 14 
2,192 06 



r,241 37 



118 42 



355,718 50 



$443,078 29 



$2,203,553 91 



$6,306 22 



155,457 41 
161,763 63 



$2,661,668 95 



34,560 63 



4,812 25 


6,457 27 


8,058 67 


517,653 21 


272,289 39 


11,233 09 


23,314 67 


3,163 05 


137,888 54 


15,385 24 


,559,389 74 



2,536 63 

72,937 34 
2,192 06 



5,233,540 73 
1,447,208 55 
1,545,028 33 



9,000 00 

60,657 45 
$10,660,752 60 



lL> 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



General Character op Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1905. 



From Beginning of Work 
to December 31, 1905. 



Amounts brought forward, 

Construction — Con. 
Contracts completed, protection Cochltuate 
Supply : — 
Town of Framingham, low-level sewer, 
Contracts completed, Rosemary siphon, . 
Contracts completed, pipo line, Dam No. 3 to 

Dam No. 1, 

Contracts completed, Clinton sewerage sys. 

tem 

Contracts, Weston Aqueduct: — 

Contracts completed and final payments 

made prior to January 1, 1905, . 
Shanahan, Casparis & Co., . . Sect. 2, 

Sundry bills paid under this contract, 
Shanahan, Casparis & Co., . . Sect. 3, 

Sundry bills paid under this contract, 
Shanahan, Casparis & Co., . . Sect. 6, 

Sundry bills paid under this contract, 
Winston & Co., . . Sects. 8 and 10, 
Shanahan, Casparis & Co., . . Sect. 12, 

Sundry bills paid under this contract, 
Winston & Co Sect. 15, 

Contracts, Distribution System : — 
Contracts completed and final payments 

made prior to January 1, 1905, . 
Warren Foundry and Machine Co., cast- 
iron water pipes and special castings, 1 
R. D. Wood & Co., special castings, . 

Deduct value of pipes, valves, etc., included 
in above list, transferred to maintenance 
account December 31, 1900, 

Additional work : — 

Labor 

Professional services, medical services, anal- 
yses, etc., 

Travelling 

Rent, 

Water rates, 

Freight and express 

Jobbing and repairing 

Tools, machinery, appliances and hardware 
supplies, 

Electrical supplies 

Castings, ironwork and metals, 

Iron pipe and valves 

Amount* carried forward, 



$443,078 29 



$10,660,752 60 



$4,182 57 


4,140 28 


2,127 60 


3,549 68 
2,970 00 


14,731 62 



$2,122 33 
1,857 28 



31,701 75 



3,979 61 





9,000 00 




5,916 96 




17,240 22 




66,878 22 


$1,448,087 96 




201,827 74 




2,911 80 




126,420 70 




4,214 78 




108,933 26 




6,968 05 




150,101 77 




138,151 78 




3,339 77 




183,374 58 


2,374,332 19 


$4,383,372 31 




2,122 33 




1,857 28 




$4,387,351 92 





$19,385 75 

190 02 
437 25 

19 39 

258 94 
962 02 

856 48 

94 47 

6,704 43 

1,622 06 

$30,530 81 $478,759 65 



4,384,212 15 



3,139 77 

$653,789 83 

1,799 01 

2,427 22 

3,656 73 

1,440 47 

12,097 65 

9,414 96 

72,239 42 

4,924 68 

67,819 73 

55,937 11 

$885,446 81 $17,518,332 34 



1 Includes some ironwork for Wachusett Dam. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



43 



General Character of Expenditures. 


For the Tear ending 
December 31, 1905. 


From Beginning of Work 
to December 31, 1905. 


Amounts brought forward, 


$30,530 81 


$478,759 65 


$885,446 81 


$17,518,332 34 


Construction — Con. 










Additional work — Con. 












- 




1,339 48 








133 33 




4,198 93 




Fuel, oil and waste, 




43 72 




10,383 09 




Lumber and field buildings, . 




1,794 82 




81,749 40 








224 80 




8,924 28 




Brick, cement and stone, 




279 45 




24,003 81 




Sand, gravel and filling, .... 




916 30 




6,753 56 




Municipal and corporation work, . 




510 28 




208,166 67 








7,467 91 




210,296 74 




Sanitary inspection, 




1,204 07 




12,526 25 




Judgments and settlements for damage 


s, . 


5,188 45 




42,483 06 




Unclassified supplies, 




900 70 




15,303 36 




Miscellaneous expenses, 




47 55 


49,232 19 


3,085 83 


1,514,661 27 






Legal and expert : — 












- 




$4,668 82 






$1,339 92 




1,862 66 






- 




909 04 




Miscellaneous expenses, .... 


122 00 


1,461 92 


171 05 


7,611 57 






Real Estate. 










Legal and expert : — 










Legal services, 


- 




$4,736 31 




Conveyancer and assistants, 








$4,731 00 




104,119 97 




Experts 








- 




17,871 58 




Appraisers, 








912 27 




21,961 36 




Court expenses, 








1,394 50 




9,823 30 




Counsel expenses, . 








- 




43 25 




Conveyancing supplies, . 








6 00 




3,155 53 




Conveyancing expenses, . 








76 36 




5,794 34 




Miscellaneous expenses, . 








267 69 




4,195 81 




Settlements made by Board, 








30,755 00 




3,290,070 84 




Judgments, .... 








22,170 35 




159,100 58 




Taxes and tax equivalents, 








265 34 




68,182 41 




Care and disposal, 








7,199 16 


67,777 67 


74,612 13 


3,763,667 41 






Damages to Real Estate not taken, to Business 










and on Account of Loss of Wages. 










Legal and expert : — 












- 




$1,130 67 






- 




1,635 08 






$1,330 70 




11,570 29 






16,760 00 




397,627 82 






7,941 08 


26,031 78 


96,639 68 


508,603 54 




. 


Amounts carried forward, 








$623,263 21 


$23,312,876 13 



11 



METROPOLITAN WATKR 



[Pub. Doc. 



General Character op Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1905. 



From Beginning of Work 
to December 31, 1905. 



Amounts brought forward, 

i Wiims on Account of Dir< rsion of Water. 
Legal and t-xperl : — 

Legal services 

Expert services, ...... 

Court expenses, 

Miscellaneous expenses, 

Settlements, 

Judgments, 

Purchase of Existing Water Works. 
Legal and expert : — 

Legal services, 

Expert services, 

Court expenses, 

Miscellaneous expenses, 

Settlements and judgments 

Relocation Central Massachusetts Railroad. 
Settlements, 

Total amount of construction expenditures, 



$623,263 21 



$9,200 21 
23,495 05 



32,695 26 



$655,958 47 



$23,312,876 13 



$3,774 98 

19,339 69 

19,105 69 

1,222 63 

917,350 00 

218,358 91 



$1,878 89 

13,569 82 

27,228 38 

1,470 94 

14,330,440 78 



1,179,151 90 



14,374,588 81 



177,597 39 
$39,044,214 23 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1905. 



Maintenance and Operation op Works. 
Administration : — 

Commissioners 

Secretary, auditor and assistants, 

Postage, printing, stationery and other supplies, 

Travelling, 

Telephone, heating, lighting and care of building, 

Alterations and repairs of building 

Rent and taxes, office building 

Miscellaneous expenses, 



Supervision and general superintendence : — 
Chief engineer and department engineers, . 
Engineering and clerical assistants, 
Postage, printing, stationery and office supplies, 
Telephone, heating, lighting and care of offices, 
Travelling and incidental expenses, 
Alterations and repairs of buildings, . 

Rent and taxes, main office 

Miscellaneous expenses, 



Amount carried forward, 



$3,500 00 

4,672 67 

1,626 57 

94 64 

549 09 

103 44 

420 00 

39 50 



$8,150 01 
7,848 90 

715 51 
1,912 90 

165 20 

546 48 
1,260 00 

205 70 



$11,005 91 



20,804 70 



$31,810 61 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



45 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1905. 



Amount brought forward, . 

Pumping service : — 

Labor, 

Fuel 

Oil, waste and packing, . 

Repairs and renewals, . 

Small supplies and expenses, 

Rent, West Roxbury pumping station, 



Superintendents and assistant superintendents 

Engineering assistants 

Laboratory force, 

Sanitary inspectors, 

Recording and scientific instruments and supplies 

Labor and teaming, 

Tools, machinery and appliances 

Lumber and hardware supplies 

Jobbing and repairing 

Travelling 

Horses, vehicles and stable expenses, 

Fuel, lighting and telephone 

Municipal and corporation work 

Unclassified supplies, 

Miscellaneous expenses, 

Conveyancer and assistants 

Taxes and tax equivalents, 

Contracts and agreements, 

Contracts for pipes, valves, etc., bought from construction work since 
January 1, 1905, 



Total expenditures for maintenance and operation, 



$45,848 36 

39,154 23 

1,571 69 

3,431 85 

2,627 08 

771 24 



$3,827 44 

13,017 20 

2,189 93 

3,473 52 

662 73 

107,733 84 

2,842 18 

3,872 63 

821 01 

4,525 84 

4,178 09 

5,515 94 

499 24 

6,208 87 

3,568 23 

1 60 

29,896 13 

446 50 

181 59 



$31,810 61 



93,404 45 



193,462 51 
$318,677 57 



(b) Receipts. 

The total amount of receipts from rents, sales of property, etc., 
for the year beginning January 1, 1905, and ending December 31, 
1905, is $69,567.52 ; and the total amount from the time of the 
organization of the Metropolitan Water Board, July 19, 1895, to 
December 31, 1905, is $462,220.36. The general character of these 
receipts is as follows : — 



lh 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Qenbral Character of Receipts. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1905. 



From Beginning of Work 
to December 31, 1905. 



For distribution back to District : — 

District entrance fees, 

Supplying water outside of District, . 
Water furnished to water companies, . 

To the credit of the loan fund : — 

Real estate and buildings 

Labor, tools, supplies and reimbursements, 

To the credit of the sinking fund : — 
Forfeiture for contracts awarded but not 

executed, 

Rents, 

Land products 

Unclassified receipts and interest, 



Total receipts, 



$33,222 75 
441 85 



$8,066 17 
20,128 48 



$33,664 60 



28,194 65 



$4,202 98 

3,489 07 

16 22 



7,708 27 
$69,567 52 



$92,265 00 
84,879 59 
37,145 88 



$27,652 65 
96,112 85 



$500 00 

86,146 13 

35,185 44 

2,332 82 



$214,290 47 



123,765 50 



124,164 39 
$462,220 36 



The foregoing receipts have been credited to the various objects 
or works, as follows : — 



Receipts from Different Works. 


For the Year ending 
December 31, 1905. 


From Beginning of Work 
to December 31, 1905. 


Distribution back to District: — 












Admission into Metropolitan Water District 












(Quincy, Nahant, Arlington, Stoneham, 












Milton and Lexington) 


- 






$92,265 00 




Supplying water to cities and towns outside 












of Water District (Swampscott, Revere, 












Lexington and Cambridge), 


$33,222 75 






84,879 59 




Water furniebed to water companies, . 


441 85 


$33,664 


60 


37,145 88 


$214,290 47 


Construction and acquisition of works : — 






Administration 


$29 00 






$42 15 




Wachusett Dam 


3 22 






4,900 31 




Wachusett Reservoir, 


16,899 60 






121,037 85 




Wachusett Aqueduct 


- 






5,204 70 




Weston Aqueduct, 


433 73 






4,747 47 




Sudbury Reservoir and watershed, 


2 50 






7,277 26 




Distribution system 


7,052 68 






61,754 42 




Diversion of water, Clinton sewerage system, 


86 85 






1,277 94 




Purchase of existing water works, 
Maintenance and operation of works : — 


1,979 25 


26,486 


83 


10,670 27 


216,812 37 


Wachusett Aqueduct, . 


$409 75 






$3,470 36 




Wachusett Reservoir, 


4,987 62 






10,298 29 




Sudbury system, 


640 38 






7,497 31 




Distribution system, 


2,894 67 






7,174 45 




Clinton sewerage system 


483 67 


9,416 09 


2,677 11 


31,117 52 




$69,567 52 


$462,220 36 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



47 



(c) Assets. 
The following is an abstract of the assets of the Water Works, 
a complete schedule of which is kept on file in the office of the 
Board : — 

Office furniture, fixtures and supplies ; engineering and scientific instruments and 
supplies ; police supplies ; horses, vehicles, field machinery, etc. ; machinery, 
tools and other appliances and supplies ; real estate connected with works 
not completed; completed works, including real estate and buildings con- 
nected therewith. 

(cZ) Liabilities. 

There are liabilities as follows : — 

Current bills unpaid, 111,985 8s 1 

Due on monthly pay rolls, 3,341 09 



$15,326 97 



Amounts reserved on Monthly Estimates, not due until Completion of Contracts or 

until Claims are settled. 



Name. 



Work. 



Amount. 



McArthur Bros. Co., 
Busch Bros., . 
The H. Gore Co., 
The H. Gore Co., 
Bruno, Salomone & Pe 
John F. Magee & Co., 
F. A. McCauliff, . 
McArthur Bros. Co., 



itti, 



Wachusett Dam, 

Building road, Wachusett Reservoir, 

Surfacing highways, Sect. 1, 

Surfacing highways, Sect. 2, 

Wachusett Reservoir, Sect. 10, . . 

South Dike, 

Masonry arch bridge at West Boylston, . 
Relocation Central Massachusetts Railroad, Sect. 2, 



$10,000 00 

600 00 

1,104 23 

1,386 83 

25,000 00 

1,455 52 

1,982 31 

10,000 00 



$51,528 89 



Amounts have been agreed upon in the following cases, but the 
deeds have not yet passed : — 

Martha E. Prescott, estate of, $400 ; Bertram A. Bancroft, $150 ; 
Lucy White, $250 ; Pratt and Inman, $48 ; Charles F. C. Henderson, 



On the claims of the following it is impossible to state the 
amounts due for land damages, water rights and claims for damages 
to established business, as no sums have been agreed upon, and 
suits are now pending in the court for the determination of most of 
them : — 



1 Miscellaneous current bills of 1905, including those coming in from time to time, after January 1, 
1906, have since been paid. 



18 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Charles L. Johnson, Charles B, Sawin, Framingham Water Com- 
pany, Town of Wesl Boylston, Eliza M. Childs et ah, Charles J. 
Paine, George II. Thompson, Benjamin II. Clemmons, Edward 
Dooley, Walter E. Chapman, Chapman and Tobin, Lucy Cutting, 
George D. Lawrence, Charles C. Landy, Alfred N. Whiting, 
Houghton Bros., Robert Johnson, George H. Longley, John F. 
O'Brien, Patrick Bradley, Thomas H. Burgess, Margaret F. Tonry, 
Lucy A. Wood, Edwin C. Fairbanks, Hannah McAndrew, Fred 
Counter, Whitman M. Huntington, George W. Brown, Clarence 
Tan ill, estate of Andrew L. Fitch, Joseph O. Billiard et al., Josiah 
W. Walkup, Mary Morse, William M. Bruce, Kayajan Scrabian, 
El win I. Chase, Alzina A. Wilson, Henry F. Keyes, Robert C. 
Houghton et al., John Burns, Patrick Daley, Rebecca T. Farr, Annie 
L. Gibbons, Francis Gibbons, John Gibbons, Henry Wilson Co- 
operative Bank, Mary J. Hensby, William E. Keating, Millard E. 
Lewis, Middlesex Fells Spring Company, Lillian F. Pullen et al., 
William E. Sprague, James E. Welch, Caroline E. Tyson, Andrew 
Lienhardt, John E. Stone, Bridget M. Joyce, Israel L. Barnes, et al., 
William L. Bancroft, George H. Chase, Andrew L. Nourse, Byron 

D. Allen, J. Frank Wood et al., Harriet A. Adams, George F. 
Bond, Emory W. Johnson, Nellie M. Kirby, Elizabeth M. Myers, 
Emily S. Warren, Jennie L. Goodnow, Asa Knight, John Lambert, 
Emily W. Parker, Andrew J. Scarlett et al., estate of Walter H. 
Smith, Worcester County Truant School, James H. Atherton, J. 
Quincy Dix, John E. Farnsworth, Mary J. Fyfe, estate of William 

E. Fyfe, Lizzie M. Gray, William B. Haskell, Henry F. Haynes, 
Sarah G. Haynes, Eben C. Mann, George M. Plummer, Howard D. 
Stone, Luther Willard, Bernard Adler, heirs of Anton Brinkhaus, 
estate of Bernard Brockelman, Margaret Graichen, Christopher 
Gunderman, Addie K. Harris, John A. Heinold, Joseph Maehnert, 
James Mulgren, William A. Nye, Frederick R. Peinert, Henry 
Richter, Jr., William H. Wilbur, Elizabeth Wittig, Susan C. 
Wright, Eva R. Zeigler, Bridget Zink, estate of Abigail Boynton, 
Lawrence Cavanaugh, Waldo B. Howe, Jonathan M. Keyes, William 
W. Keyes, Samuel F. Mason, Edward F. Merriam, James Roach, 
Henrietta M. Andrews, James A. Bigelow, First Parish of Boylston, 
William H. Brigham, John Fitzgerald, estate of Augustus Flagg, 
Mary J. Hastings, executrix, George R. Hastings, William H. 
Hastings, Henry J. Hyde, Everett and Oliver S. Kendall, Sanford 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOAED. 49 

C. Kendall, William C. Rosenthal, Jennie W. Taylor, administra- 
trix, estate of William H. Vickery, James H. and Hannah S. Wood, 
Asenath M. Bartlett, estate of Charles I. Longley, estate of Daniel 
M. Marsh, Harthan and Wilder, Henry B. Stone, Joseph M. Bige- 
low, Louis Bond, Francis W. M. Goodale, Henry L. Hastings, 
Waldo B. Howe, Per Arvid Lundgren, James Moran, John B. F. 
Prescott, John V. Tobin, administrator, Mary J. Warren, Ashley 
H. Wood, Charles H. and Lizzie M. Chandler, John Dee, Silas E. 
Harthan, John Lynch, heirs of Maurice Mulcahy, estate of Mary C. 
Rice, Mary Scanlon et ah, Eclid Sene, Waushacum Lake Company, 
John S. Ott, Annie Coans et al., Catherine Flanagan, Lawrence 
Fury, Bridget Harrity et ah, Catherine Kittredge, Catherine J. 
Kittredge, Patrick A. and Bridget Kittredge, Patrick H. Morrison, 
Helen Nickerson et ah, James E. Wise, Edward J. DeCourcey. 

VI. METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE WORKS. 

The Metropolitan Sewerage Works are divided into two systems, 
the North Metropolitan System and the South Metropolitan System. 

The North Metropolitan System provides for the district situated 
largely in the Charles River and Mystic River valleys lying north 
of the Charles River, and embraces the cities of Cambridge, Chelsea, 
Everett, Maiden, Medford, Melrose, Somerville, Woburn and parts 
of Boston, and the towns of Arlington, Belmont, Revere, Stoneham, 
Wakefield, Winchester, Winthrop and part of Lexington. The 
district has an area of 90.50 square miles. It has an estimated 
population, as of December 31, 1905, based upon the census of 
1905, of 478,845 ; and it is estimated that of this number 376,57 5, 
or 78.6 per cent., contribute sewage to the North Metropolitan 
System. 

The South Metropolitan System provides for the areas situated in 
the Charles River valley lying south of the Charles River, a portion 
of the valley north of the Charles River, and also a portion of the 
Neponset River valley, and embraces the cities of Newton, Quincy, 
Waltham and portions of Boston, and the towns of Brookline, Hyde 
Park, Milton, Watertown and part of Dedham. This district has 
an area of 100.87 square miles. It has an estimated population, as 
of December 31, 1905, of 300,650, of which number it is estimated 
that 156,360, or 52 per cent., contribute sewage to the South Metro- 
politan System. 



50 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

(1) North Metropolitan System — Construction. 
During the past year no actual construction has been carried on 

for the North Metropolitan System, although certain bills contracted 
during the preceding year, amounting to $2,260.65, were paid during 
the year 11)05 on account of construction. 

(2) South Metropolitan System — Construction. 

The construction carried on during the past year in the South 
Metropolitan District has been for the completion of the High-level 
Sewer, which had been in process of building for several years 
preceding. 

The grounds at Nut Island have been graded in such manner as 
to give the island a natural appearance similar to that which it for- 
merly had, and the slopes have been covered with loam. Roads 
have been constructed upon the island and across the bar or em- 
bankment connecting the island with the main land at Hough's Neck. 

Proper roadways and paths have also been constructed at the 
Ward Street station, and the surrounding grounds have been graded, 
covered with loam and seeded. 

A 24-inch cast-iron force main has been laid from its connection 
with the High-level Sewer at Greenleaf Street in Quincy to the 
Quincy pumping station, a total length of 3,025 feet. The line was 
laid to a considerable extent through Merrymount Park, but the 
work was accomplished without injury to the shrubbery or trees of 
the park. The main was completed in August, and on August 14 
the Quincy sewage was diverted from the Moon Island works of the 
city of Boston and has since been discharged through the High-level 
Sewer. 

When the Charles River valley sewer was diverted at Vancouver 
Street so as to connect with the Ward Street station and the High- 
level Sewer, there was left, extending from Vancouver Street along 
Huntington Avenue to Gainsborough Street and connecting with the 
Boston Main Drainage Works, a length of about 1,800 feet. In 
order that this portion of the South Metropolitan District should 
contribute its sewage to the High-level Sewer, it was necessary to 
change the grade of the sewer so as to cause the sewage to run in the 
opposite direction. The territory in question remained tributary to 
the Boston Main Drainage Works during a large part of the year, 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 51 

pending a discussion with the city of Boston in relation to an inter- 
change of sewers for mutual benefit ; but in December it was deemed 
advisable to proceed with the work of making the change, which 
is still in progress. About 1,100 feet, extending from Vancouver 
Street to Parker Street, have been nearly completed. It is expected 
that the change will be entirely accomplished on or about March 1 
of the current year, at which time the entire flow of the old Charles 
River valley main sewer will be carried to the Ward Street station 
and discharged through the High-level Sewer. 

Upon the completion of the above-mentioned work all the sewage 
of the South Metropolitan System will be delivered into the High- 
level Sewer for disposal at the outlets off Nut Island, with the ex- 
ception of the sewage of small districts in Dorchester and Milton, 
included in the Neponset River valley system. The areas of these 
districts are too low for sewage to be delivered into the High-level 
Sewer without pumping, and arrangements for the disposal of the 
sewage from these sections through the Boston Main Drainage Works 
will continue to be made with the city of Boston. 

All the foregoing work of construction upon the South Metro- 
politan System has been carried on by day labor under the immediate 
direction of the engineers and foremen of the maintenance depart- 
ment. 

The tw r o Allis engines in the Ward Street pumping station have 
been in regular operation for more than a year past, but from time 
to time various modifications and changes have been made, as found 
essential to satisfy the rigorous tests under the contract for their 
construction. The trial tests of these engines have therefore not yet 
been made, and the final payments under the contract have yet to 
be adjusted. 

(3) Settlements for Real Estate. 

Since January 1, 1905, settlements have been effected on account 
of the takings made in the North Metropolitan District in 2 cases, 
involving a payment of $575 ; and in cases in the South Metro- 
politan District 6 settlements have been effected, under which pa}'- 
ments have been made amounting to $2,178.62. 

Of the 8 sewerage settlements, 4 were on account of the sewer 
extension to Brookline, 2 on account of the extension of the sewer 
in Cambridge for Belmont, 2 on account of the High-level Sewer, 1 
in Quincy and 1 in Milton. 



52 



MKTROPOLITAX WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Summary of Land Settlements for the Year 


1905. 




Location. 


Area in 
Acre*. 


Number of 
Settlements. 


Payments. 


North Metropolitan District. 
Cambridge, 


.087 


2 


$575 00 


Total, 

South Metropolitan District. 

Q.uiney, 


.087 

.741 

1.070 

.364 


2 

1 
4 

1 


$575 00 

8380 08 

1,473 54 

325 00 


Total 

Aggregate, 


2.175 

2.262 


6 

8 


$2,178 62 
$2,753 62 



(4) North Metropolitan System — Maintenance. 

The North Metropolitan System required the maintenance of 
58.004 miles of main sewers, with which are connected 573.57 miles 
of local sewers, the number of connections with the Metropolitan 
System being 583. 

Of the municipalities belonging to this system, the Deer Island 
district of Boston, Winthrop, Maiden, Melrose, Medford, Winches- 
ter, AVoburn, Stoneham, Arlington, Belmont, Wakefield and Revere 
maintain separate sewers, the East Boston and Charlestown districts 
of Boston, Everett, Cambridge, Somerville and Chelsea have both 
separate and combined sewers. 

Four pumping stations are maintained for this system, the Alewife 
Brook pumping station at Somerville, the East Boston pumping 
station, the Charlestown pumping station and the Deer Island pump- 
ing station. 

There have been pumped at the Alewife Brook pumping station 
3,234,000 gallons of sewage per day, with an average lift of 13.13 
feet, at a cost of $0,340 per million gallons per foot lifted; at the 
Charlestown station 29,900,000 gallons per day, 7.85 feet lift, at a 
cost of $0,154 per million gallons per foot; at the East Boston 
station 52,400,000 gallons per day, 16.23 feet lift, at a cost of 
$0,060 per million gallons per foot; and at the Deer Island station 
54,400,000 gallons per day, 10.63 feet lift, at a cost of $0,087 per 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 53 

million gallons per foot lifted. The cost of pumping per million 
gallons has been considerably reduced from the cost in the preced- 
ing years. The number of gallons of sewage discharged at the out- 
fall in Boston harbor is represented by the number of gallons of 
sewage pumped at the Deer Island station. Owing to the unusually 
dry season, the amounts pumped showed a decrease from the pre- 
ceding year varying at the different stations from 3.9 per cent, to 
8.8 per cent. 

Taking the estimated population of the district contributing sew- 
age, the amount of sewage discharged averaged 144 gallons per day 
for each person ; but this amount represents a considerable quantity 
of rain water received in the sewers, as not all of the local sewers 
were restricted to the admission of sewage proper only. 

During the year 12 public and 26 special connections with local 
sewers have been made, giving a total addition of 48.81 miles of 
connecting sewers. 

It was found that the action of the sea had caused the removal of 
a portion of the embankment placed over the outfall sewer running 
from Deer Island, and consequently a considerable amount of riprap 
has been deposited upon the embankment in order to prevent 
further encroachment. 

The new main sewer, built in the years 1900 and 1901 to receive 
the sewage of the town of Wakefield, was extended only to a point 
in the city of Maiden near Barrett's Pond, where it was connected 
with the original Metropolitan main sewer, it being deemed that 
for a series of years the original sewer had a sufficient capacity from 
this point to discharge the contents of both sewers. During the past 
year the Metropolitan sewer below Barrett's Pond became at times 
surcharged, and considerable overflows of sewage resulted. It is 
now necessary to continue the Wakefield sewer to tide water, and 
authorization therefor, at an estimated cost of $55,000, has been 
sought from the Legislature. 

The cost of maintenance of the North Metropolitan System during 
the past year was $117,517.07. 

(5) South Metropolitan System — Maintenance. 

In the South Metropolitan System there are maintained 38.121 
miles of main sewers, with which are connected 439.74 miles of local 
sewers, having 100 connections with the Metropolitan System. 



54 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Newton, Watertown, Waltham, Hyde Park, Dedham, the West 
Roxbury district of Boston and Quincy maintain separate sewers, 
and the Back Bay, Brighton and Dorchester districts of Boston, 
Brookline and Milton maintain both separate and combined sewers. 

There are maintained for this system the Ward Street pumping 
station, the Quincy pumping station and the screen-house at Nut 
Island. 

The 'Ward Street pumping station, which was first put into opera- 
tion near the end of the preceding year, has since been in constant 
service. The pumping engines, though put to regular use, have been 
subject to tests and modifications by the contractors prior to their 
final test for acceptance, which has not yet been made. 

There have been pumped at the Ward Street station an average of 
20,940,000 gallons per day, with an average lift of 40.26 feet, at a 
cost of $0,066 per million gallons per foot lifted; and at the Quincy 
station 3,180,000 gallons, 32.18 feet lift, at an average cost of $0.17 
per million gallons per foot lifted. 

An average of 25,000,000 gallons of sewage has passed daily 
through the screens at the Nut Island screen-house, and been dis- 
charged from the outfalls into the outer harbor. The maximum 
discharge per day has been 78,000,000 gallons, which occurred 
during a heavy storm. The sewage discharged averages 160 gallons 
per day per person of the estimated number contributing sewage in 
the district. 

An examination by divers of the bed of the harbor near the out- 
lets has failed to reveal deposits of any kind, and, upon careful 
investigations of the shores of both mainland and islands in the 
yicinity, few if any traces of sewer deposits have been found. 

The sewage required to be pumped by the Quincy station has 
reached the proper capacity of the present engines. The flow re- 
ceived during periods of storms already exceeds the capacity of the 
larger of the two pumping engines, so that serious consequences 
might ensue from the breaking down of either of them. The Board 
has accordingly determined to supply an additional engine for this 
station. 

The expenditures for maintenance for the past year were $146,- 
076.06. 

It is expected that, inasmuch as early in the current year the 
sewage of the Huntington Avenue section of the Charles River valley 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 55 

district in Boston will be received into the High-level Sewer, there- 
after no rental will be payable to the city of Boston on account of the 
discharge, through the Boston Main Drainage Works, of sewage of 
the South Metropolitan District, except that coming from the com- 
paratively small low area in Dorchester and Milton. 

VII. SEWERAGE WORKS — FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

The Metropolitan sewerage loans for the construction of the Sew- 
erage Works of the North Metropolitan System have amounted to 
$6,105,865.73, to which are added receipts from various sources 
amounting to $17,153.40. The amount of expenditures approved 
by the Board for payment for the year 1905 was $2,260.65, and 
the total amount of expenditures approved to January 1, 1906, 
was $6,088,830.56. The balance on hand January 1, 1906, was 
$34,188.57. 

The loans for the construction of the various parts of the South 
Metropolitan System have amounted to $7,692,046.27. The receipts 
applicable to the loan fund have been $6,622.27. The amount of 
expenditures approved for payment in the year 1905 was $43,780.19. 
The total amount of expenditures approved for payment from the 
beginning of the works has been $7,624,042.66. The oalance on 
hand for the South Metropolitan System on January 1, 1906, was 
$74,625.88. 

The bonds issued on account of the loans have been for varying 
periods, not exceeding forty years, and bear interest at the rate of 3 
per cent, and 3% per cent. The premiums received on account of 
the sale of bonds on the North Metropolitan System have amounted 
to $173,819.15, and those received on account of the South Metro- 
politan System have amounted to $389,374.53. 

The amount expended for maintenance of the North Metropoli- 
tan System in the year 1905 was $117,517.07, and for the South 
Metropolitan System $146,076.06, a total for both systems of 
$263,593.13. 

The assessments made to meet interest, sinking fund require- 
ments, and maintenance and operation of the North Metropolitan 
System amounted in the year 1905 to $378,507.29, and the assess- 
ments for the South Metropolitan System amounted to $441,566.78. 

The following is a detailed financial statement regarding the 
Metropolitan Sewerage Works : — 



METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc 

(1) Metropolitan Sewerage Loans, Receipts and Payments. 
The loans for the construction of the Metropolitan Sewerage 
Works, the receipts which are added to the proceeds of these loans, 
and the expenditures for construction have been as follows: — 

(a) North Metropolitan System. 

Loans under various acts of the Legislature (given in detail in 

report for the year 1901) . . .$5,605,865 73 

Loans under chapters 242, 336 and 399, Acts of 1903, . . . 500,000 00 
Proceeds from sales of property and from other sources to Decem- 
ber 31, 1905 17,153 40 



$6,123,019 13 



Amount approved by the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission and 
the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board for payment to 
December 31, 1905 (of which $2,260.65 is for the year 1905), . 6,088,830 56 

Balance, North Metropolitan System, January 1, 1906, . . $34,188 57 

(b) South Metropolitan System. 
Charles River Valley Sewer. 

Loans under the Acts of the years 1889 and 1900, . - $800,046 27 

Amount approved by the Metropolitan Sewerage 

Commission for payment to December 31, 1905, . $800,046 27 

Neponset River Valley Sewer. 

Loans under various acts of the Legislature (given 

in detail in report for the year 1901), ... - 900,00000 

Loan, chapter 315, Acts of 1903, .... - 4,000 00 

Proceeds from pumping ground water, ... - 109 50 

Amount approved by the Metropolitan Sewerage 

Commission and the Metropolitan Water and 

Sewerage Board for payment to December 31, 1905 

(of which $2,269.54 is for the year 1905), . . 905,733 80 

High-level Sewer. 

Loan under chapter 424 of the Acts of 1899, original 

loan, - 4,600,000 00 

Loan, chapter 356 of the Acts of 1903, ... - 996,000 00 

Loans, chapters 230 and 246 of the Acts of 1904, . - 392,000 00 

Proceeds from sales of property and other sources 

to December 31, 1905 (of which $644.28 is for the 

year 1905) - 6,512 77 

Amounts carried forward, $1,705,780 07 $7,698,668 54 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



57 



Amounts brought forward, . 



. $1,705,780 07 $7,698,668 54 



Amount approved by the Metropolitan Sewerage 
Commission and the Metropolitan Water and 
Sewerage Board for payment to December 31, 1905 
(of which $41,510.65 is for the year 1905), . . 5,918,262 59 



Balance, South Metropolitan System, January 1, 
1906, . . " 



7,624,042 66 



$74,625 88 



(2) Issues of Metropolitan Sewerage Loan Bonds. 
The Treasurer of the Commonwealth, under the authority of the 
successive statutes, has from time to time issued bonds designated 
" Metropolitan Sewerage Loan," as follows : — 



Metropolitan Sewer Loans, North System. 
Bonds issued. 



Date of Sale. 



Amount 

of Bonds 

sold. 



Rate of In- 
terest (per 
cent.). 



Price 
received. 



Date due. 



Premium. 



Apr. 2, 1890, 
Apr. 2, 1890, 
Apr. 2, 1890, 
Apr. 2, 1890, 
Apr., 1890, 
Feb., 1891, 
Mar., 1891, 
Mar., 1891, 
Jan., 1892, 
Feb., 1892, 
Mar., 1892, 
June, 1892, 
July, 1892, 
Aug., 1892, 
Nov., 1892, 
Nov., 1892, 
Jan., 1893, 
Jan., 1893, 
Feb., 1893, 
Feb., 1893, 
Feb, 1893, 
Mar., 1893, 
May 1, 1894, 
Oct., 1894, 
Oct., 1894, 
Nov., 1894, 
Nov., 1894, 
Dec., 1894, 
Apr., 1895, 
Dec, 1896, 



$500,000 

500,000 

500,000 

500,000 

200,000 

50,000 

300,000 

18,000 

35,000 

29,000 

50,000 

436,000 

150,000 

150,000 

3,000 

200,000 

35,000 

25,000 

20,000 

5,000 

400,000 

94,000 

464,000 

4,000 

1,000 

15,000 

10,000 

6,000 

300,000 

30,000 



102.40 

103.02 

103.62 

102.327 

103. 

104. 

104. 

104. 

100. 

100. 

101. 

101.50 

101.50 

101.60 

100.50 

100. 

100.50 

100.50 

101. 

100.50 

100.25 

100.25 

100. 

100. 

100. 

100. 

100. 

100. 

100. 

100. 



Jan. 1, 


1930, 


Jan. lj 


1930, 


Jan. 1 


1930, 


Jan. 1 


1930, 


Jan. 1, 


1930, 


Jan. 1 


1930, 


Jan. 1, 


1930, 


Jan. 1 


1930, 


Jan. 1 


1930, 


Jan. 1 


1930, 


Jan. 1 


1930, 


Jan. 1 


1930, 


Jan. 1 


1930, 


Jan. 1 


1930, 


Jan. 1 


1930, 


Jan. 1 


1930, 


Jan. 1 


1930, 


Jan. 1 


1930, 


Jan. 1 


1930, 


Jan. 1 


1930, 


Jan. 1 


1930, 


Jan. 1 


1930, 


Jan. 1 


1930, 


Jan. 1 


1930, 


Jan. 1 


1930, 


Jan. 1 


1930, 


Jan. 1 


1930, 


Jan. 1 


1930, 


Jan. 1 


1930, 


Jan. 1 


1930, 



$12,000 00 

15,100 00 

18,100 00 

11,635 00 

6,000 00 

) 

\> 35,130 301 



500 00 

11,060 001 

15 00 

175 00 
125 00 
200 00 
25 00 
1,000 00 
235 00 



i Readjustment of Treasurer. 



58 



MKTROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Metropolitan Sewer Loans, North System — Concluded. 
Bonds issued — Concluded. 



DATS dp Sale. 


Amount 

of Bonds 
sold. 


Rate of In- 
terest (per 
cent.). 


Price 
received. 


Date due. 


Premium. 


Juno, 


1897, 


$70,000 


8* 


106.243 


Jan. 1, 1930, 


j $5,084 80 1 


June, 


1897, 












10,000 


3>£ 


106.243 


Jan. 1, 1930, 




Apr., 


1898, 












5,000 


3 


100. 


Jan. 1, 1930, 


) 


June, 


1898, 












155,000 


3>£ 


100. 


Jan. 1, 1930, 


\ 22,843 751 


Juue, 


1898, 












60,000 


W 


100. 


Jan. 1, 1930, 


J 


Apr., 


1900, 












265,000 


3 


103.948 


Jan. 1, 1930, 


10,462 20 


May, 


1903, 












200,000 


zy a 


104.9797 


Jan. 1, 1930, 


9,959 40 


May, 


1903, 












50,000 


3K 


106.2424 


Jan. 1, 1943, 


3,121 20 


July, 


1903, 












250,000 
$6,095,000 


3% 


104.419 


July 1, 1943, 


11,047 50 
















$173,819 15 



Metropolitan Sewer Loans, South System. 
Bonds issued. 



Date or Sale. 


Amount 
of Bonds 

sold. 


Rate of In- 
terest (per 
cent.). 


Price 
received. 


Date due. 


Premium. 


Apr., : 


1890 


$100,000 


3 


103. 


Jan. 1, 1930, 


$3,000 00 


Apr., 


1890, 












400,000 


3 


103. 


Jan. 1 


, 1930, 


12,000 00 


May, 


1890, 












300,000 


3 


104. 


Jan. 1 


, 1930, 


12,000 00 


Aug., " 


L895, 












300,000 


3 


100.585 


Mar. 1 


, 1935, 


1,755 00 


Feb., 


1896, 












50,000 


3 


100. 


Mar. 1 


, 1935, 


- 


Dec, ] 


L896, 












135,000 


3 


100. 


Mar. 1 


, 1935, 


- 


Dec, 


1896, 












15,000 


3 


100. 


Mar. 1 


, 1935, 


- 


June, 1 


897, 












300,000 


3K 


106.98 


Mar. 1 


, 1935, 


20,940 00 


June, 


1898, 












35,000 


3^ 


100. 


Mar. 1 


, 1935, 


4,088 001 


June, ] 


L899, 












25,000 


3 


100.64 


Mar. 1 


, 1936, 


160 00 


June, 


L899, 












1,000,000 


3 


100.64 


July 1 


1939, 


6,400 00 


Sept., ■ 


L900, 












10,000 


3 


100.79 


July 1 


, 1939, 


79 00 


Sept., 


1900, 












912 


3 


100. 


July 1 


1939, 


- 


Apr., ] 


1901, 












40,000 


3 


100.915 


Mar. 1 


, 1936, 


366 00 


Sept., " 


1901, 












2,000,000 


zy 2 


106.71 


July 1 


1940, 


134,200 00 


Sept., 


L902, 












14,000 


3 


100. 


July 1 


1939, 


- 


Sept., ] 


1902, 












500,000 


zy* 


107.243 


July 1 


1940, 


36,215 00 


Sept., 


1902, 












150,000 


3K 


107.2395 


July 1 


1940, 


10,859 25 


Dec, ] 


1902, 












200,000 


3^ 


107.79 


July 1, 


1940, 


15,580 00 


Feb., 3 


903, 












100,000 


3K 


108.25 


July 1, 


1940, 


8,230 56 » 


Apr., 


1903, 












100,000 


3K 


106.75 


July 1 


1940, 


6,750 00 


Apr., ] 


903, 












175,000 


3^ 


106.75 


July 1, 


1940, 


11,812 50 


Apr., ] 


903, 












203,000 


3^ 


106.75 


July 1, 


1940, 


13,702 50 


Apr., ] 


903, 












25,000 


3K 


106.494 


July 1, 


1940, 


1,623 50 


Apr., 1 


1903, 












133,000 


zy» 


105.9364 


July 1, 


1940, 


7,895 42 


May, ] 


L903, 












996,000 


zy z 


106.2424 


Jan. 1 


1943, 


62,174 31 


May, ] 


903, 












4,000 


3K 


105.5453 


Mar. 1, 


1935, 


221 81 


July, ] 


1904, 












392,000 
$7,702,912 


3^ 


104.929 


July 1, 


1944, 


19,321 68 




















$389,374 53 



Readjustment of Treasurer. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



59 



(3) Metropolitan Sewerage Loans Sinking Fund. 

Under authority of chapter 122 of the Acts of 1899, and section 
14 of chapter 424 of the Acts of 1899, the Treasurer of the Com- 
monwealth was required to consolidate the sinking funds of all the 
Metropolitan sewerage loans into one fund, to be known as the 
Metropolitan Sewerage Loans Sinking Fund. The Board received, 
during the year, from rentals and from other sources, to be applied 
to the sinking fund, $75. 

The sinking fund established has amounted at the end of each year 
to sums as follows : — 



December 31, 1899, 
December 31, 1900, 
December 31, 1901, 
December 31, 1902, 



0361,416 59 
454,520 57 
545,668 26 
636,084 04 



December 31, 1903, 
December 31, 1904, 
December 31, 1905, 



$754,690 41 

878,557 12 

1,008,724 95 



(4) Annual Appropriations, Receipts and Expenditures. 

The annual appropriations for the maintenance of the Metropoli- 
tan Sewerage Works, the receipts of the Board which are added to 
the appropriations for maintenance, and the expenditures for main- 
tenance for the year ending December 31, 1905, have been as 
follows : — 

North Metropolitan System. 

Balance January 1, 1905, $21,593 22 

Appropriation under chapter 215 of the Acts of 1905, , . . 127,000 00 
Receipts from pumping and from other sources, . . . 1,821 00 

$150,414 22 
Amount approved by the Board for payment, 117,517 07 

Balance January 1, 1906, $32,897 15 

South Metropolitan System. 

Balance January 1, 1905, . . . $410 48 

Appropriation under chapter 214 of the Acts of 1905, . . . 144,920 00 
Receipts from sales of property, from pumping and from other 
sources, 885 57 

$146,216 05 
Amount approved by the Board for payment, 146,076 06 

Balance January 1, 1906, $139 99 



60 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



(5) Annual Assessments. 
Assessments for the year, amounting to $378,507.20 for the North 
Metropolitan System and to $441,56(1.78 for the South Metropolitan 
System, were required for the payment of interest and sinking fund 
requirements and the cost of maintenance and operation of works. 
The requirements for the North Metropolitan System were : for 
interest, $195,409.32; for the sinking fund, $51,807.19; and for 
maintenance, $131,290.78. For the South Metropolitan System 
the requirements were: for interest, $248,235.92; for the sinking 
fund, S4f>, 729.02 : and for maintenance, $147,601.84. These assess- 
ments were made upon the cities and towns in the respective dis- 
tricts in accordance with the ratios determined by the Apportionment 
Commissioners under chapter 439 of the Acts of the year 1889 and 
chapter 224 of the Acts of the year 1899, and were as follows : — " 



North Metropolitan Sewerage System. 



Arlington, 
Belmont, . 
Boston, . 
Cambridge, 
Chelsea, . 
Everett, . 
Lexington, 
Maiden, . 
Medford, . 
Melrose, . 



$8,320 12 
4,769 69 
66,616 40 
89,341 00 
25,166 15 
18,889 74 
2,549 18 
29,709 46 
18,421 41 
12,077 04 



Somerville, 

Stoneham, 

Wakefield, 

Winchester, 

Winthrop, 

Woburn, . 

Revere, . 

Total, 



$51,853 10 
5,105 05 
7,866 30 
7,944 84 
6,159 96 
11,024 37 
12,693 48 

$378,507 29 



South Metropolitan Sewerage System. 



Boston, . 
Brookline, 
Dedham, 1 
Hyde Park, 
Milton, . 
Newton, . 


. $186,191 56 
75,288 19 
11,115 08 
15,347 41 
19,637 96 
63,797 61 


Quincy, . 
Waltham, 
Watertown, 

Total, 


$28,586 71 
27,997 80 
13,604 46 


. $441,566 78 



1 Exclusive of Weetwood. 



(6) Expenditures for the Different Works. 
The following is a summary of the expenditures made in the 
various operations for the different works : — 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



61 



Construction. 



For Year ending 
December 31, 1905. 



From Beginning of Work 
to December 31, 1905. 



North Metropolitan System. 
Original system, main line and branches, 

Lexington branch, 

Everett branch 

Wakefield branch 

Stoneham branch, ...... 

Chelsea and Everett outlets, 
Wakefield branch extension, 

Revere extension 

Belmont extension 

Total North Metropolitan System, . 

South Metropolitan System. 
Charles River valley sewer, main line, 
Neponset River valley sewer, main line, . 
Brookline branch 

High-level Sewer, 

Total South Metropolitan System, . 

Total for construction, both systems, 



$200 00 
187 20 

1,271 08 
602 37 



$50 00 
2,219 54 

41,510 65 



$2,260 65 



43,780 19 



$46,040 84 



$5,383,932 67 
68,585 15 
54,877 12 
35,698 29 
11,574 10 
71,216 41 
190,070 97 
215,722 79 
57,153 06 



$866,595 66 
39,138 14 



$6,088,830 56 



,046 27 



905,733 80 
5,918,262 59 

$7,624,042 66 
$13,712,873 22 



ivr . r-.™,™^ . -. T ~™ For Year ending 
Maintenance. December 31, 1905. 


From Beginning 

of Work to 

December 31, 1905. 


- 


$117,517 07 
146,076 06 


$1,012,779 47 
936,356 33 




$263,593 13 


$1,949,135 80 



(7) Detailed Financial Statement. 
The Board herewith presents, in accordance with the Metropolitan 
Sewerage Acts, an abstract of the expenditures and disbursements, 
receipts, assets and liabilities for the year ending December 31, 

1905: — 

(a) Expenditures and Disbursements. 



General Character op Expenditures. 



For Year ending 

December 31, 

1905. 



North Metropolitan System — Construction. 
Engineers, inspectors, rodmen, laborers and others, 
Postage, telephone and telegrams, 
Brick, cement, lumber and other field supplies, . 

Amount carried forward, . . . 



$22 00 

1 76 

796 12 



$819 88 



.;•_> 



MKTKOPOUTAX WATEB 



[Pub. Doc. 



OkNBRAL CHARACTER OF KXFKNDITDKKO. 



For Year ending 

December 81, 

1905. 



Amount brought forward, 

North Metropolitan System — Construction 
Contracts : — 
Chelsea and Everett Outlets : — 

H. A. Ilanscom & Co., Sect. 56, 
Revere Extension : — 
Charles A. Haskin, Sect. 61, . 
Land takings, purchase and recording, . 



Concluded. 



Total, 



South Metropolitan System — Construction. 
Nepojiset River Valley Sewer : — 

Experts and appraisers, 

Brook line branch : — 

Carriage hire, 

Experts and appraisers, ...... 

Land takings, purchase and recording, 



Total, 



High-level Sewer : — 

Secretary, 

Clerical services, 

Engineers, inspectors, rodmen, laborers and others, 

Carriage hire and travelling expenses, . 

Rent of office, Ashburton Place, .... 

Teaming and express, 

Brick, cement, lumber and other field supplies, . 

Tools and repairs of same, 

Contracts : — 

Hiram W. Phillips, Sect. 43 

Lockwood Manufacturing Co., Sect. 44, 
Woodbury & Leighton Co., Sect. 44, . 
E. W. & J. J. Everson, Sect 66, . 
E. W. Everson & Co., Sect. 75 (part), 
Lockwood Manufacturing Co., Sect. 77, 

Land takings, purchase and recording, . 

Experts and appraisers, 

Legal services, 

Claims and allowances on contracts, 

Water rates and connections, 



Total, 



North Metropolitan System — Maintenance 
Administration : — 

Commissioners, secretary and assistants, . 
Postage, printing, stationery and office supplies, 
Rent, telephone, heating, lighting and care of offices 
Miscellaneous expenses, 



Amount carried forward, 



$819 88 



200 00 

638 40 
602 37 



$2,260 65 



$50 00 

15 00 

675 00 

1,529 54 



$2,269 54 



$175 00 

295 00 

15,139 48 

141 00 

333 33 

22 00 

6,267 85 

13 45 



9,705 

1,678 

1,500 

950 

1,000 

1,929 

757 

225 

31 

1,250 



23 
80 
00 
00 
00 
30 
71 
00 
50 
00 



96 00 



$41,510 65 



05,058 34 

650 86 

1,571 08 

102 14 



$7,382 42 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



63 



Genekal Character of Expenditures. 



For Year ending 

December 31, 

1905. 



Amount brought forward, 

North Metropolitan System — Maintenance — Concluded 
General superintendence : — 

Engineer and assistants, 

Postage, printing, stationery and office supplies, 

Rent, telephone, heating, lighting and care of offices 

Miscellaneous expenses, 
Deer Island pumping station 

Labor, . 

Coal, . 

Oil and waste, 

Water, . 

Packing, 

Repairs and renewals, 

Telephones and office supplies, 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, 
East Boston pumping station 

Labor, . 

Coal, . 

Oil and waste, 

Water, . 

Packing, 

Repairs and renewals, 

Telephones and office supplies, 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, 
Charlestown pumping station : — 

Labor, . 

Coal, 

Oil and waste, 

Water, . 

Packing, 

Repairs and renewals, 

Telephones and office supplies, 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, 
Alewife Brook pumping station : — 

Labor, . 

Coal, . 

Oil and waste, 

Water, . 

Packing, 

Repairs and renewals, 

Telephones and office supplies, 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, 
Sewer lines, labor, .... 

Supplies and expenses, 

Horses, vehicles and stable account, 

Total, 

South Metropolitan System — Maintenance, 
Administration : — 
Commissioners, secretary and assistants, . 
Postage, printing, stationery and office supplies, 
Rent, telephone, heating, lighting and care of building, 
Miscellaneous expenses, 

Amount carried forward, 



r ,382 42 



10,529 23 

993 99 

3,606 76 

194 20 



11,383 41 
5,521 97 

328 
1,025 

309 

564 

243 
1,243 



21 

47 
28 
88 
06 
58 



10,802 51 

7,357 59 

361 88 

1.056 60 
72 37 

486 82 
148 93 
683 12 

10,743 81 
3,316 97 
291 85 
405 60 
182 05 
339 53 
217 43 
1,971 14 

3,307 79 

1,382 17 

147 79 

150 48 

41 56 

70 55 

160 79 

152 12 

21,529 06 

5.057 81 
3,752 29 



.17,517 07 



$5,710 00 

636 55 

1,151 73 

1,255 80 



1,754 08 



64 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



GBVKBAI CllAKACTKR OF EXFKNDIT0KK8. 



For Year ending 

December 81, 

1905. 



Amount brought forward. 




. 






$8,754 08 


South Metropolitan System — Maintenance — Concluded. 




General superintendence : — 




Engineer and assistants, . 


4,260 91 


Postage, printing, stationery and office supplies, 






353 23 


Kent, telephone, heating, lighting and care of offices, 






661 90 


Miscellaneous expenses, 






119 45 


Sewer lines, labor, 










9,949 35 


Supplies and expenses, 










1,834 29 


City of Boston, for pumping and interest, 










72,318 85 


Horses, vehicles and stable account, . 










2,230 18 


Quiney pumping station : — 












Labor, 










4,244 24 


Coal 










1,580 00 


Oil and waste, 










47 40 


Water, . 










329 96 


Packing, 










42 23 


Repairs and renewals, 










155 81 


Telephones and office supplies, . - . 










122 68 


Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, 










1,878 46 


City of Boston, for discharge of sewage, 










622 21 


Ward Street pumping station . — 












Labor, " 










14,453 34 


Coal 










8,199 80 


Oil and waste, 










878 19 


Water, 










1,117 20 


Packing, ...... 










98 81 


Repairs and renewals, 










247 58 


Telephones and office supplies, . 










239 10 


Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, 










4,488 40 


Nut Island screen-house : — 












Labor, 










4,632 99 


Coal, . 










920 50 


Oil and waste, 










51 45 


Packing, . . . 










9 68 


Telephones and office supplies, . 










223 15 


Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, 










899 88 


Water, 










106 92 


Re2>airs and renewals, 










3 84 


Total, 




• 






$146,076 06 



(b) Receipts' 

The receipts from the sales of property, from rents and from 
other sources, have been credited as follows : — 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



65 



Account. 



For Year ending 
December 31, 

1905. 



From Beginning of 

Work to December 

31, 1905. 



North Metropolitan System — construction, . 
South Metropolitan System — construction,. 
North Metropolitan System — maintenance, 
South Metropolitan System — maintenance, 
Metropolitan Sewerage Loans Sinking Fund, 

Totals, 



$129 87 
644 28 

1,821 00 

885 57 

75 00 



$3,555 72 



$ 17,153 40 

6,622 27 

7,176 53 

1,027 43 

835 20 



$32,814 83 



(c) Assets. 

The following is an abstract of the assets of the Sewerage Works, 
a complete schedule of which is kept on file in the office of the 
Board : — 

Office furniture, fixtures and supplies ; engineering and scientific instruments 
and supplies ; horses, vehicles, field machinery, etc. ; machinery, tools and 
other appliances and supplies ; real estate connected with works not com- 
pleted ; completed works, including real estate connected therewith. 

(d) Liabilities. 
There are liabilities as follows : — 



Current bills unpaid, 
Due on monthly pay rolls, 



1,460 24 
610 55 



\070 79 



Amounts on Monthly Estimates, not due until Completion of Contracts or until 

Claims are settled. 



Name. 


Work. 


Amount. 


High-level Sewer : — 

J. W. Bustin & Co 

National Contracting Co., 
E. W. Everson & Co., . 
Allis-Chalmers Co , 


Sect. 57, reserved for repairs, 
Sect. 73, contract abandoned, 
Sect. 75, .... 
Sect. 77, .... 


$100 00 

5,516 17 

1,000 00 

51,000 00 




$57,616 17 



On the claims of the following it is impossible to state the amounts 
due for land and other damages, as no sums have been agreed upon, 



66 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

and >uits are now pending in the courts for the determination of 
most o\' them : — 

Holyhood Cemetery Association, Boston Elevated Railway Com- 
pany, Boston & Maine Railroad, Mary Rohan, Mary E. Connolly, 
National Contracting Company, Jacob M. Mason, Martin Dings, 
Anna L. Dunican, Emma Dings, Carrie S. Urquhart, N. Jefferson 
Urquhart, Edwin N, Urquhart, Mary Doherty, Mary E. Doherty, 
Richard Jones, James Doherty, Michael Niland, Fred W. Baker, 
Catherine A. Baker, Walter J. Baker, Freda E. Baker. 

\ III. CONSUMPTION OF WATER. 

The average daily quantity of water consumed in the cities and 
towns supplied by the Metropolitan Water Works during the year 
was 118,398,000 gallons, an increase of 3,489,000 gallons per day 
over that of the preceding year. The consumption during the year 
was 131.2 gallons per inhabitant per day, as against 129.4 gallons 1 
in the preceding year. The increase seems to have occurred almost 
entirely in the southern high-service district and in the northern 
and southern extra high-service districts, the last comprising the 
highest portions of AVest Roxbury and Milton. The maximum con- 
sumption of water in winter occurs when the temperature is lowest, 
and the summer maximum, though less than that of the winter, is 
reached during periods of drought. 

The measurement of the water supplied to each municipality in 
the District, which the Board has been able to make by the use of the 
Venturi meters, has shown results similar to those reported for the 
preceding year. An examination of the tables, giving the amounts 
of water consumed by the different municipalities in different months 
of the year and hours of the day, shows conclusively the absolute 
waste which occurs in many parts of the District. It is noticeable 
that the tables show in the coldest weather of the year a rate of con- 
sumption between the hours of 1 and 4 in the morning abnormally 
high, although during these hours but very small quantities of water 
are used for any legitimate purposes. The waste is shown to occur 

1 The consumption per capita as stated in last year's report was less than the amount 
here given, as the estimate of population was found too large, and has been corrected by 
the recent census. 

The figures of consumption given here are for all of the water delivered from the 
various sources of supply, and they slightly exceed the figures of the quantity of water 
delivered to the different municipalities as measured by the Venturi meters. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 67 

not only from allowing the water to run continuously in the coldest 
season in order to avoid the freezing of the pipes, but also from 
defective fixtures in houses, and leakages in the local systems. It is 
estimated that one-half of the increase in the consumption of water 
during the past year over that of the preceding year is attributable 
to the increase in the amount of leakage and waste, and not to the 
growth of population or necessary uses. 

In its preliminary report made to the Legislature at the beginning 
of the present year the Board called especial attention to the desir- 
ability of legislation for the prevention of waste and excessive use 
of water, and advised that, for the purpose of promoting this end, 
further change should be made in the basis of assessments. Its re- 
port upon this subject was as follows : — 

The time not only when certain impending expenditures will be required, 
but also when the District will be called upon to seek additional sources of 
water supply, are both dependent upon the rate of consumption of water in 
the various municipalities of the Metropolitan Water District. 

In the year 1894, when the State Board of Health made its report,, the 
average rate of consumption per capita in the municipalities now constitut- 
ing the District was 88 gallons per clay ; and it was estimated that an aver- 
age quantity of 100 gallons per capita as a rate of consumption would be 
required in the year 1920, and this amount was the assumed rate for the 
succeeding years, so that 100 gallons per capita per day was the quantity 
declared proper to be used in estimating the requirements of the succeeding 
thirty years. It was upon this basis that the calculations as to the capacity 
required and the time for which the works recommended would be sufficient 
were made. 

The average rate of 100 gallons per capita per day was actually reached 
in the year 1896 ; and in the year 1905 the average rate in the District was 
129 gallons per capita, and in the city of Boston the rate of consumption 
reached the amount of 151 gallons. 

The Board is still of the opinion, from the careful investigations which 
have been made, that 100 gallons per capita per day are ample, and indeed 
more than ample, for all the proper needs of the District, and that it is both 
possible and practicable to prevent the unnecessary use and waste which 
make up the excess. 

In the lack of further legislation, the remedy for the over-consumption 
lies with the local authorities of the various municipalities of the District. 

In the year 1904 the Legislature changed in part the basis upon which 
the assessments upon the various cities and towns were fixed. It was pro- 



68 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc 

vided that, beginning with the year L906, assessments should be made in 
the cities and towns other than Boston, one-third in proportion to their 
respective valuations, and two-thirds in proportion to the quantity of water 
respectively consumed by them, the Legislature of that year substituting, so 
far as those cities and towns were concerned, consumption as an element of 
assessment instead of population. The assessment of the city of Boston 
remained as originally fixed, being based upon the proportion which its 
valuation bears to the total valuation of the District. 

It is believed by the Board that the time has come when the principle of 
consumption should be made an element in the assessment of Boston, as 
well as in the assessments payable by the other cities and towns. The 
reason why a certain discrimination was made in the original act against 
the city of Boston, because the act provided that the works of water supply 
of that city should be taken and paid for, has now lost much of its force. 

It is believed that making consumption an important element in the ques- 
tion of assessment will not only tend to decrease the consumption in the 
city of Boston, but prove the most effective means of postponing the large 
expenditures which may be required in the future. Although the act of the 
year 1904 takes effect in the current year, the good results which have come 
from the enactment of the statute have been already seen in the movements 
which have been begun in several of the municipalities, looking to the in- 
troduction of meters, and a more rigorous inspection in the interest of de- 
creasing the yearly assessments. 

The application of meters and more careful inspection are greatly to be 
desired, and it is far preferable that these should be supplied by the action 
of the local authorities than compelled by general legislation. 

The Board urges not only the desirability of general legislation, 
but also urges upon the various municipalities of the District the 
adoption of measures, through the introduction of meters, rigorous 
inspection or otherwise, which shall tend to decrease the unneces- 
sary consumption, and to save unnecessary burdens which fall not 
only upon the people of the District itself, but, in case of uncalled- 
for extensions of works, upon residents of other portions of the 
Commonwealth, whose lands are taken, whose other properties are 
affected in value, and whose business interests are impaired. 

IX. ELECTROLYSIS. 

Investigations and experiments have been continued relative to 
the extent of the injury done to the water pipes by the underground 
electric currents, and for the purpose of overcoming or reducing 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 69 

the injuries which have resulted. The investigations have been 
made especially as to the injury or disintegration caused by the 
return currents of the electricity given off by the electric railway 
lines. 

Although in no case during the past year have sections of pipe 
been found so pitted and decomposed as to compel their replace- 
ment or render their continuance hazardous, it appears that the 
process of disintegration is steadily going on, especially in the 
vicinity of the electric power stations. Experiments which were 
begun in the preceding year in co-operation with one of the railway 
companies, as to the effect of the application of insulating joints, 
were continued. The result has indicated that, while some bene- 
fit has been experienced upon the portions of the pipes directly 
affected by the insulating joints, other injuries have resulted, and 
there has been a distribution of the damage over more remote por- 
tions, where it is still more difficult to locate the trouble. Other 
means must be adopted to protect the pipes from the serious injury 
impending. The trouble is not confined to the water pipes of the 
Metropolitan Works, but it is arising on the local systems of different 
kinds throughout the District and State. 

X. MOTH SUPPRESSION. 

Much work has been required for the suppression of the ravages 
of the gypsy and brown-tail moths, the region about Spot Pond in 
Medford and Stoneham being within the portion of the State which 
has been especially infested by the moths. 

Near the end of the preceding year there was begun a systematic 
but discriminating cutting of the very thick growth of trees which 
bordered the pond upon the west and south, and at the same time 
much of the dense underbrush was removed. This work was under- 
taken not only for the purpose of reducing the number of trees to 
be protected, but also for the general improvement of the wooded 
areas. Thus considerable firewood was obtained and sold. Much 
of the wood, which was badly infested, as well as the brush, had to 
be burned. 

The area about Spot Pond, on which the moths had appeared to 
a greater or less extent, embraced about 200 acres. There were, 
however, about 80 acres which were worst affected, principally by 
the gypsy moths ; and upon these areas active work was begun in 



70 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

February for protecting the trees by applying creosote to the egg 
clusters, by placing bands of burlap about the trees and in some 
cases also by encircling them with tanglefoot, and by spraying the 
foliage with disparene. Notwithstanding these efforts, many of the 
caterpillars escaped, and further applications of tanglefoot were made 
and the spraying was continued until the middle of the summer. 

The spraying of the trees was accomplished with hose by the use 
of a portable steam boiler and steam pump connected with two 300- 
gallon tanks, in which the disparene was mixed with water in the 
proportion of one part of disparene to ten parts of water. The 
mixture was conveyed from the pump to the place of application 
through iron pipes, to which were connected rubber hose and nozzles. 
At first the water was brought from the pond by water carts, but 
later it w r as found more economical to install a second boiler and 
pump near the pond. 

At several points windrows of hay sprinkled with gas oil were 
laid along the boundary line of the Board lands, to prevent the 
caterpillars from entering from the surrounding lands which had 
not been adequately protected. 

As the result of these measures, the tract of 80 acres was but 
very little injured, and it is hoped that a moderate amount of work 
in the coming season will keep the trees on this land in good condi- 
tion. 

Some portions of the remaining land w r est of the pond are still 
badly infested with both the gypsy and brown-tail moths ; and in 
the latter part of November the w r ork of protection was resumed by 
applying to the eggs of the gypsy moths a mixture of equal parts of 
creosote and gas oil, and by cutting off and burning the nests of the 
brown-tail moths. 

Similar work has been performed upon the lands about Mystic 
Lake and the Mystic Keservoir in Medford and Somerville, where 
both the gypsy and brown-tail moths have appeared. 

The lands about the Chestnut Hill Reservoir had also been attacked 
by the brown-tail moths, and considerable work has been done in 
destroying their nests. The spraying of the foliage has been done 
by arrangement with the Boston Park Commission. The gypsy 
moth has made its first appearance in this region during the past 
season. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 71 

Beginning with the end of the preceding year, the sum of 
$10,123.76 was spent in the work above described. Of this 
amount, however, about $3,800 was expended in the cutting of the 
trees and underbrush. The sum of $959.43 has been received from 
the sale of firewood, and wood estimated to be worth $400 remains 
on hand. The sum of $491.08 was expended on account of the work 
about the Mystic lands, and $482 on the lands about the Chestnut 
Hill Reservoir. 

XI. APPORTIONMENT OF ANNUAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE 
SOUTH METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE SYSTEM. 

The Commissioners appointed by the Supreme Judicial Court to 
apportion among the cities and towns constituting the South Metro- 
politan Sewerage District the proportions which each should pay 
during the period comprising the years 1905 to 1909 inclusive, on 
account of the annual assessment necessary for the payment of the 
interest and sinking fund requirements and of the cost of maintenance 
and operation, made their report on June 9, 1905. The Commis- 
sioners followed the same conclusions which had been reached by 
the previous commission of apportionment for the South Metro- 
politan System, and by the three commissions previously appointed 
for the North Metropolitan System, in fixing the payments for the 
interest and sinking fund requirements, that is, for the cost of con- 
struction, according to the respective valuations of the municipalities, 
and the payments for the cost of maintenance and operation accord- 
ing to their respective populations. 

Provision will have to be made during the present year for a new 
apportionment of the assessments for the North Metropolitan Dis- 
trict. Inasmuch as all the five commissions appointed to make the 
apportionment since the beginning of the works have adopted the 
same bases of apportionment, there would seem to be good reason 
why the matter should now be fixed by legislation, and the con- 
siderable expenditures attending the appointment of commissions 
should be saved to the District. 

The report and award of the Commissioners for the South Metro- 
politan Sewerage District are found as Appendix No. 7. 



72 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



XII. RECOMMENDATIONS FOR ADDITIONAL WATER LOANS 

AND OTHER LEGISLATION. 

The Board, in its preliminary report to the Legislature of the 
year 1906, recommended that provision be made for further addi- 
tions to the Metropolitan Water Loan Fund for future construction 
and acquisition of works. The recommendations were as follows : — 

It appears from the financial statement that on January 1, 1906, a bal- 
ance remains on account of the Metropolitan Water Loan Fund, for the 
construction and acquisition of works, amounting to $1,079,551.27. The 
Wachusett Dam and Reservoir have now so nearly reached completion that 
the construction of the dam and reservoir will be entirely finished during 
the coining season. Nearly all of the other work which, by the Metropolitan 
Water Act of 1895, was contemplated to be performed during the first ten 
years, lias already been completed. 

For the construction of the system of Metropolitan Waterworks, " sub- 
stantially in accordance with the plans and recommendations of the State 
Board of Health," as contained in their report for the year 1895, careful 
estimates were made. When the Legislature enacted the Metropolitan 
Water Act in the year 1895, the Board, in addition to building works 
as recommended by the State Board of Health, was required to take and 
pay for the works held by the city of Boston for the purposes of a water 
supply, as well as Spot Pond and the lands under and surrounding the same, 
owned by the cities of Maiden, Medford and Melrose, and to make various 
other lesser expenditures, for which no estimates were made. Subsequent 
Legislatures have made still further requirements calling for large expendi- 
tures, for which also no appropriations whatever were provided. 

The State Board of Health estimated the cost of the works called for by 
its recommendations to be $19,045,800; and the cost of an aqueduct to 
Weston, to be constructed within ten years, with main pipes extending to 
the distributing system, to be a further amount of $4,982,000. An addi- 
tional expenditure for the second ten years was estimated to require a sum 
of $1,300,000. 

The Act of 1895 made provision for the issue of bonds to the amount 
of $27,000,000. Subsequently, in the year 1901, after a settlement had 
been effected with the city of Boston, under which it was provided that 
$12,768,948.80 should be paid for its waterworks taken, in addition to 
$1,157,921.59 before paid that city in reimbursement, and $1,884,320.68 
required for the completion of its unfinished works, making a total of 
$15,811,191.07, provision was made for a further issue of bonds to the 
amount of $13,000,000, making the total issue authorized up to the present 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 73 

time $40,000,000, to the proceeds of which is to be added certain receipts 
applied to the Water Loan Fund, which have now amounted to $123,765.50. 

Spot Pond and the lands and water works adjacent were taken from the 
cities of Maiden, Medford and Melrose on January 1, 1898, and negotia- 
tions were soon begun by the Board looking toward a settlement of the 
claims of these cities for compensation. In December of the year 1899 these 
cities brought suits against the Commonwealth for the recovery of damages 
on account of the takings of 1898. The suit of the city of Medford also 
included damages on account of the taking of some additional land, made 
in August, 1899 ; and on May 11, 1904, a further suit for a comparatively 
small amount of damages on account of the taking of some additional lands 
and rights from the city of Medford was brought by that city. 

Subsequently, on August 9, 1901, after the settlement had been effected 
with the city of Boston, the Board, with the assent of the Attorney-General, 
offered to settle with these cities upon substantially the same basis upon 
which payment had been made to the city of Boston for its works, namely, 
the cost of the works taken, together with interest at 3|- per cent., from 
November 1, 1900, this being the extent of the offer which the Board 
deemed that it was then justified in making. 

The total cost of their works, under computations made from the state- 
ments received by the Board from the three cities, was $287,630.57 ; and 
the interest accrued from November 1, 1900, to the date of the offers, 
would have amounted to $7,774.02 additional. These offers not being 
accepted, the claims continued to be prosecuted under the suits brought in 
court. 

The auditors appointed by the court to determine the amount of the 
damages sustained, after a prolonged hearing, on June 19, 1905, filed their 
award, by which they gave to the three cities a total sum in damages of 
$875,452.75, to which was added interest from the date of the takings to 
the date of the award, of $364,027.16, the principal and interest amount- 
ing to $1,239,479.91. There had, however, been paid, principally under 
chapter 317 of the Acts of the year 1904, providing for partial payments 
in cases of takings under the right of eminent domain in advance of the 
judgment of a judicial tribunal, the sum of $342,820.68, so that under 
the award of the auditors there remained to be paid, as of June 19, 1905, 
the sum of $896,659.23. The Board has been called upon to pay legal 
expenses, as nearly as can now be determined, in addition to the above 
total, amounting to more than $41,000. 

Though the amount of the award had, under the advice of the engineers 
and experts whom it consulted, been deemed by the Board very greatly in 
excess of the sum believed to be due to these cities as proper compensation 
for their property taken, the Board, acting according to the advice of the 



7 1 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Attorney-General, lias now assented to a settlement by which the sum of 
$896,659.28, named as due on June 19, 11)05, shall be paid, but no further 
interest shall be payable. Seventy per cent, of this amount is to be paid 
directly, and the balance at a later date. 

Inasmuch as the payment of the amount remaining due under the Spot 
Pond award will Leave a sum insullicieut to provide for the payment of 
indebtedness already accrued and the completion of works now in progress, 
and for the construction of such works as are believed to be required for 
the coming year, so that it will become necessary in any event that an 
additional loan fund shall now be authorized, the Board has deemed it 
proper to present a statement of the works which it now seems may be re- 
quired during a series of years to come. It is of course impossible to state 
with exactness the cost, especially of works to be constructed in the unde- 
termined future, or to estimate correctly the amount of demands which are 
subject to the decisions and judgments of the courts. 

It is estimated that there will be required sums as follows : — 

Works completed, in Progress and deemed called for in the Coming Year. 

For the payment of claims and reserves under completed contracts, 
for the completion of contracts and work now pending, for damages 
under suits and claims still unsettled, and for administration, engi- 
neering and legal expenses connected with the above, the sum of . f 345,000 

For various works which will be required during the coming season 
for the completion of the Wachusett Dam and Reservoir, with the 
necessary administration and engineering expenses, .... 50,000 

For the Chestnut Hill and Arlington pumping stations, and other work 

in conneetion with the aqueducts and pipe lines, .... 38,000 

For the drainage of swamps in both the Wachusett and Sudbury water- 
sheds, the construction of filter-beds and other works for the pre- 
vention of pollution, which the Board believes are demanded for the 
sanitary improvement of the system, 200,000 

For the construction of a masonry tower around the Arlington stand- 
pipe, which the Board believes to be desirable, 40,000 



Total, $673,000 

The payments and works covered by the first three items in the above 
list, and a portion of the fourth item, seem absolutely required. The fourth 
and fifth items relate to works upon which construction has not been begun, 
but which the Board believes should certainly or properly be undertaken 
during the coming year. 

There are other works for the distribution of water which have not been 
entered upon, but which will probably be required sooner or later during 
the period of the next few years. The time when these works will be re- 



No. 57.] AND SEWEEAGE BOARD. 75 

quired is dependent upon the success of the efforts which may be made for 
checking or lessening the waste and unnecessary use of water. Should the 
consumption of water go on increasing at the rate at which it has increased 
during the past ten years, a portion at least of these should be begun early 
in the period. These requirements are as follows : — 

Works not yet begun, but needed from Time to Time, in the Next Few Years. 

For a main pipe line from Weston Aqueduct to Medford, . . $850,000 00 

For an additional pipe line from Everett to Revere, . . . 40,000 00 
For a new pumping engine at the high-service station at Chestnut 

Hill Reservoir 150,000 00 

For a new pipe line from Medford to Maiden, .... 150,000 00 



Total, $1,190,000 00 

There is another class of works, the construction of one or another of 
which may be called for at a short notice, or may perhaps be deferred for 
a considerable period to come. The town of Hyde Park and the city of 
Newton are parts of the Metropolitan Water District, and pay partial 
annual assessments, but as yet have not called for a water supply. When- 
ever they deem that their own sources are insufficient, the Board is required 
to furnish them water. So, also, any city or town not now embraced 
within the District, but situated within the ten-mile limit, must be admitted 
to the District, and receive a water supply on payment of such sum as the 
Board may determine, the sum so received not being applied to the Metro- 
politan Water Loan Fund, but being distributed back to the cities and 
towns composing the District. 

Inasmuch as these demands, though uncertain, may any of them be sud- 
denly made, it would seem that a proper appropriation therefor should now 
be authorized for use when the occasion arises. 

Works required when Additional Cities and Towns call for a Water Supply from 

the Metropolitan Water Works. 

For a pipe line to supply the town of Hyde Park, .... $100,000 00 
For pumping machinery and pipes to supply the city of Newton, 115,000 00 
For works which may be required upon admission of municipal- 
ities to the District, say, 100,000 00 



Total, $315,000 00 

The requirements, therefore, including those which may be called for 
during a period of years to come, are now estimated by the Board as fol- 
lows : — 



76 METROPOLITAN WATKK [Pub. Doc. 

For the payment of the Spot Pond award, . $896,659 23 

For payments and construction during the coming year, . . 673,000 00 
For works for which the time of construction is dependent upon 

the consumption of water, 1,190,000 00 

For works for which the time of construction is dependent upon 

the demands of municipalities, 315,000 00 



Total $3,074,659 23 

Deduct balance of Metropolitan Water Loan Fund on January 1, 

1906 1,079,551 27 



Total $1,995,107 96 

If the policy which has heretofore prevailed should now be adopted, of 
authorizing a loan sufficient for the needs of a considerable period to come, 
uuder which bonds can be issued by the Treasurer of the Commonwealth 
from time to time as the works are called for, the amount of the appropria- 
tion which should now be authorized is $2,000,000. 

It is to be noted that, in making the foregoing estimates relative to the 
requirements for the future, the Board has included no estimates for the 
acquisition of new sources of water supply, the demand for which will be 
hastened or delayed according to the rate of consumption, nor has it in- 
cluded the amount which may be needed for machinery for the production 
of power at the Wachusett Dam. 

The amount that would be needed for the latter purpose, and the time 
when such production might begin, are still problematical. It is also 
questionable whether the amount which may be required for such machinery, 
which would be expended, not for purposes of a water supply, but for the 
making of profit, should be taken in the same manner as in other cases, 
from the water loan fund. For the carrying on of such work for profit 
the Board is of an opinion that further authorization should be given by 
the Legislature. 

The Board further recommended the passage of legislation by 
which it should be provided that all payments of money hereafter 
received from municipalities on account of their admission into the 
Metropolitan Water District, and the initial payments on account of 
water furnished to water companies, as well as all premiums received 
from sales of bonds issued for the construction both of water works 
and of sewerage works, should be applied to the respective loan 
funds, and not, as now provided, to the diminution of the annual 
assessments, as follows : — 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 77 

The Metropolitan Water Act, section 3 of chapter 488 of the Acts of 
1895, provided that all payments of money determined by the Board to be 
due from a municipality upon its subsequent admission into the District 
should be distributed to the cities and towns in proportion to the total 
amount of the annual assessments paid by them respectively. Inasmuch 
as the payment of money determined to be due on admission of a city or 
town to the District is largely determined by the additional amount which 
will be required for the extension of the system to the municipality, there 
seems to be no reason why, as the cost of such extension is payable out of the 
Water Loan Fund, the sum received on this account should not be payable 
back into the loan fund. The present provision, under which the sums so 
collected are deducted from the assessments of the year, also causes a decrease 
in the amount of the annual assessment which is rather seeming than real. 

Section 18 of the Metropolitan Water Act provides that any premiums 
received from sales of bonds issued for the construction of the works shall 
be applied to the diminution of the charges for interest, sinking fund re- 
quirements and expenses of maintenance and operation of the works. 
Although there may have been at the outset reason for this application of 
sums received from premiums, it would seem more just that money received 
in this way should be paid, like the principal, into the loan fund. 

The Board respectfully recommends that provision be made by which the 
sums received by the Treasurer from these two sources should be paid into 
the loan fund. 

A similar recommendation was made relative to the application 
of premiums from the sale of bonds issued on account of the Metro- 
politan Sewerage Loan : — 

The Board repeats the recommendation which it has made in the fore- 
going pages of this report relating to the water works, — that any premiums 
received from sales of bonds issued for the construction of works shall be 
paid, like the principal, into the loan fund, and not be applied to the 
diminution of the charges for interest, sinking fund requirements and ex- 
pense of maintenance and operation of the works for the current year. In 
the case of the sewerage works, more than in the case of the water works, 
much trouble has resulted in the past from the variation in the amounts 
actually assessed in successive years, which has arisen from the application 
of the amounts received in premiums from the sale of bonds to the diminu- 
tion of the assessment for the year. In two successive years the amounts 
paid in premiums were, in one of the years, 49 per cent, of the total 
amount of interest, sinking fund requirements and maintenance expenses, 
and in the other year 41 per cent, of the total amount. Variations of less 
amounts have occurred in other years. Great disturbance and annoyance 



78 METROPOLITAN WATEB [Pub. Doc. 

have thus been caused to the local authorities, who base coming appropria- 
tions to be required Tor their municipalities upon the payment made for the 
preceding year. 

The Board further recommended that it be permitted, while con- 
forming to the statute 4 of chapter 211 of the Acts of the year 1905, 
providing that the fiscal year of departments and hoards should 
begin on the first day of Deeember and end on the thirtieth day of 
November, and making its report thereon, including a statement 
o\' its recommendations regarding matters of legislation, to make in 
the month of February its detailed statement of the year's opera- 
tions, with the statistical tables accompanying it, for the calendar 
year preceding, as follows : — 

The Legislature of last year provided, by chapter 211, that beginning 
hereafter the fiscal year for all offices, departments, boards, commissions 
and institutions shall end with the thirtieth day of November; and further 
provided that the annual reports required of them shall be made on or before 
the third Wednesday in January. By the General Laws the annual reports 
of most boards and commissions are required to include the year ending on 
the thirtieth day of. September. The Metropolitan Water Act, however, 
made a special provision in regard to annual reports. The work of con- 
struction for the year is in its most active stage in the months of September 
and October, and is continued, according to the weather, frequently into the 
month of December, when the season's work is closed. It would be im- 
practicable, if not impossible, to make a proper detailed statement of the 
work accomplished during the year ending with September 30, and to call 
upon the engineers, who are at that time engrossed in the work of super- 
vision and inspection, to suspend their efforts, and to collect and make up 
the data upon which the report must be made. This would not only seriously 
interfere with the season's operations, but would also add materially to their 
cost. Besides, the maintenance of public works of this character, especially 
water works, calls for the compilation and publication of tables relating to 
rainfall, yield of watersheds, consumption and other important statistics, 
which are of great importance as guides for economical comparisons and 
future construction and calculation, as well as of great value in court adjudi- 
cations. These tables, many of them beginning with the operation of the 
works by the city of Boston, have been made for the calendar year, and in 
usual conformity with the similar statistics made for mutual use by other 
large cities and districts. 

It has been the practice of this Board, in accordance with the special 
statute prescribing its duties, to present to the Legislature at the beginning 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 79 

of its session a financial report of its operations, together with the recom- 
mendations which it has to offer relative to desirable legislation, as is done 
in the present report, and to make a more detailed report of the season's 
operations in the month of February. The Board recommends that it be 
permitted, while conforming to the statute of 1905 relative to the fiscal 
year, and making its report thereon, including a statement of its recom- 
mendations regarding matters of legislation, to make its detailed statement 
of the year's operations, together with the statistical tables accompanying 
it, for the calendar year, in the month of February. 

XIII. EXTENSIONS OF THE METROPOLITAN SEWERS IN 
THE NORTH AND SOUTH METROPOLITAN DISTRICTS. 

The Board in its preliminary report to the Legislature made 
further recommendations relative to needed extensions of the Metro- 
politan sewers in both the North and South Metropolitan districts, 
as follows : — 

The Legislature, by chapter 230 of the Acts of the year 1904, called 
upon the Board to determine the location, elevation and size of an exten- 
sion of the Metropolitan High-level Sewer into certain of the higher dis- 
tricts of Brookline, Brighton and Newton. The scheme for a High-level 
Sewer, adopted by chapter 424 of the Acts of the year 1899, under which 
the present High-level Sewer has been constructed, contemplated an even- 
tual extension of the sewer to these districts. The annual report of the 
Board made last year showed the location and the proposed elevation and 
size of such a sewer, determined in accordance with the provisions of the 
Act of 1904, and also contained an estimate of the cost of construction of 
the various portions of the work. It was then declared that the time was 
fast approaching when the volume of sewage discharged into the Charles 
River valley sewer, which provides for these districts as well as for the 
lower territory, will have reached the capacity of that sewer, and that 
the relief contemplated at the time of the passage of the High-level Sewer 
Act of 1899 would soon have to be afforded. A full report upon this 
matter is contained in the report of last year. 

Although the low rainfall of the past year tended greatly to reduce the 
overflow of all sewers receiving rain water in addition to the sewage, these 
overflows occurred principally along portions of the Charles River sewer 
situated in Brookline and in the Brighton and Back Bay districts of the 
city of Boston. Some complaints have already been made of injurious 
effects arising from these overflows, which occurred on as many as twelve 
to eighteen days during the last year. The Charles River in the region 



80 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

affected is now tidal, but when the Charles River Dam is either temporarily 
or permanently built, the result will quickly become more offensive and 
injurious. 

If the necessary legislation for authorizing this extension should be 
passed by the present Legislature, the preparation of detailed plans would 
undoubtedly consume the remainder of the year, and the construction of 
the portion which it is now contemplated to build first would involve two 
years more ; and it would certainly be two years or more after the com- 
pletion of the extension before the city and town would fairly avail them- 
selves of the relief offered by the new sewer. 

The High-level Sewer Act of the year 1899 provides that cities and 
towns shall connect their local sewers with the High-level Sewer; and fur- 
ther provides that the sewerage systems of all drainage areas not now 
drained by the South Metropolitan System which are constructed after the 
passage of the act shall be constructed in accordance with the so-called sep- 
arate system of sewerage. The Act passed in the year 1903 made provi- 
sion for the construction by cities and towns of drains for surface or storm 
water separate from the sewers built for the disposal of sewage proper. 

Although the plan of separate sewers to empty into the Metropolitan 
System, if completed, would obviate to a certain extent the 'overflows from 
the present sewer, it can hardly be expected that the municipalities will 
complete or even begin the construction of their separate systems in the 
regions affected before any provision is made for the building of the main 
sewer which the separate system is to enter. 

The Board is of the belief, both on sanitary grounds and for providing 
the necessary entrance for the separate local systems, that the time has now 
arrived when the construction of a portion of this extension should be 
undertaken. The estimated cost of the entire extension, as given by the 
Engineer of the Sewerage Works in the report of last year, is $1,889,906 ; 
and the cost of that portion in West Roxbury, Brookline and Brighton 
which would first be required was estimated at $1,168,928. The Board 
therefore recommends that the Legislature authorize the construction of 
this extension, and the issue of bonds to the proper amount which may be 
required for its construction. 

A comparatively small amount of construction to be begun during the 
present year is needed for the North Metropolitan System. When the 
town of Wakefield was added to this system, a new trunk line was built 
from the boundary between that town and the city of Melrose to a point 
in the centre of the city of Maiden near what is known as Barrett's Pond. 
From this location the original Metropolitan Sewer was estimated to have 
a carrying capacity sufficient for both the original line and the new line for 
a period of five years. The construction of this new sewer was completed 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 81 

in the year 1901. The time has now come when the portion of the original 
Metropolitan Sewer below Barrett's Pond is inadequate to carry the contents 
of the two sewers, and work should be at once undertaken to extend the 
Wakefield sewer to the tidal meadows on the southerly borders of the city 
of Maiden, where an efficient overflow into the waters of the Maiden River 
can be found. 

It is estimated that the necessary construction will cost $55,000; and 
the Board recommends that authority be given for the issuing of bonds for 
the North Metropolitan System for the purpose of carrying out this work. 

XIV. FUTURE WORK. 

The Wachusett Dam and the Wachusett Reservoir, which form 
the most important features of the scheme adopted by the passage 
of the Metropolitan Water Act for an additional supply of water for 
the Metropolitan District, will be completed and will be ready for 
the service for which they have been built in the current year. 
Owing to the unusually low yield of the watershed, the reservoir 
has not been rilled to the extent anticipated, although sufficiently to 
meet all the purposes of the District. About two years of normal 
rainfall will probably cause the reservoir to be substantially rilled. 

There remain to be performed some work necessary for the 
entire completion of the Dam and Reservoir and some other smaller 
undertakings now in process of completion. Final settlement is to 
be effected in the dam and later reservoir contracts. There are out- 
standing claims and suits for various damages remaining to be dis- 
posed of. Owing to the termination of the period within which 
claims could be instituted, many additional suits have been brought 
in the past year for damage to property on account of the operations 
of the Board in various localities, and for damage for depreciation of 
value, especially of property in Boylston, under the recent act giv- 
ing the owners the right to prosecute. 

Considerable further work is required upon the pumping stations. 
It is also desirable that further attention should be given to the 
drainage of swamps, both in the Wachusett and Sudbury water- 
sheds, and to the construction of filter-beds and other works for the 
prevention of pollution. 

There will be required from time to time, accordingly as there is 
greater or less consumption of water, the laying of new main pipe 
lines and the providing of new pumping facilities, and, as demand 



82 MKTROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

may be made, for water supply connections with other municipalities 
in the District not yet furnished with a water supply. The proposed 
improvement of Spot Pond Brook, called for by the Legislature of 
the year 1D04, is still dependent upon action under the petition 
already tiled for the appointment of a commission. 

The Board believes, from careful computations which have been made by 
its engineers, that the cost of the works upon which estimates were origi- 
nally made by the State Board of Health have not been exceeded in actual 
construction. This result is reached after adding to the total sum already 
expended on the construction of the works recommended by that Board, its 
estimate of the cost of the works not yet undertaken, as well as of the cost 
of the works which have been omitted as not necessary under the matured 
plans of construction. On the other hand, many of the works constructed 
have been built with greatly increased capacities, involving largely increased 
expenditures, but for which no allowances have been made. 

The total sum, as the estimated cost of the Metropolitan Water Works 
originally given by the State Board of Health, has so far only been exceeded 
on account of the additional works and requirements called for by the Legis- 
lature of 1895 in enacting the Metropolitan Water Act, and by succeeding 
Legislatures imposing additional requirements, and notwithstanding the fact 
that the cost of labor and materials has considerably increased during the 
latter part of the period of construction. It is probable, however, that, as 
the works included in the original estimates which remain still to be under- 
taken involve chiefly expenditures for labor and materials, the cost of these 
works, though comparatively small in amount, will be somewhat in excess 
of the estimates, if the present higher prices of labor and materials continue 
to prevail. 

There is urgent need of the extension to tide water of the trunk 
sewer which was originally built from the boundary line between 
the town of Wakefield and the city of Melrose to the centre of the 
city of Maiden. The Board also believes that the time has come to 
begin the extension of the High-level Sewer into the higher districts 
of Brookline, Brighton and Newton, fearing that further delay may 
in the future endanger the public health of communities along the 
line of the lower Charles Eiver valley sewer. The entering upon 
new w r ork of construction is dependent upon authorization by the 
Legislature. 

The Board is charged, in addition to the duty of construction, 
with the maintenance and operation of all the various works for the 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 83 

supply of water to the Metropolitan Water District and for the dis- 
posal of the sewage of the Metropolitan Sewerage District. 

The report of the Chief Engineer, relating to the Water Works, 
and the report of the Engineer of the Sewerage Works, with various 
tables and statistics, are herewith presented. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HENRY H. SPRAGUE. 
HENRY P. WALCOTT. 
JAMES A. BAILEY, Jr. 

Boston, February 26, 1906. 



84 MKTROrOLlTAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



REPORT OF THE CHIEF ENGINEER. 



To the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board. 

Gentlemen: — The following is a report of the operations of 
the Engineering Department of the Metropolitan Water Works for 
the year ending December 31, 1905. 

Organization. 

The list of assistants reporting directly to the Chief Engineer at 
the end of the year is as follows : — 

Dexter Brackett, . Engineer of Sudbury and Distribution Departments. 
Thomas F. Richardson, Engineer of Darn and Reservoir Department. 
William W. Locke, . Sanitary Inspector. 

Benjamin F. Hancox, . Assistant in Charge of Drafting Department. 
Samuel E. Killam, . Office Assistant. 

Frank T. Daniels, who has been Principal Office Assistant, re- 
signed on December 23 to accept a similar position with the Sewer- 
age Commission of the city of Baltimore. The work which he has 
done has been placed in charge of Benjamin F. Hancox. 

Joseph P. Davis and Hiram F. Mills have continued as consult- 
ing engineers. 

Dexter Brackett, Engineer of the Sudbury and Distribution De- 
partments, has charge of work in connection with the construction 
and maintenance of the reservoirs on the Sudbury and Cochituate 
supplies, the Weston, Sudbury and Cochituate aqueducts, and the 
pumping stations, reservoirs and pipe lines within the Metropolitan 
District. His principal assistants are as follows : — 

Charles E. Haberstroh, . Assistant Superintendent of the Sudbury Department. 
George E. Wilde, . . Assistant Superintendent of the Distribution Department. 



John W. Lynch, 
William E. Foss, 
Caleb M. Saville, 
Alfred O. Doane, 



. Engineer of Pumping Stations. 
. Division Engineer. 
. Division Engineer. 
. Division Engineer. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 85 

Thomas F. Richardson, Engineer of the Dam and Reservoir De- 
partment, has charge of work in connection with the construction 
and maintenance of the Wachusett Dam, Reservoir and Aqueduct, 
and the Clinton sewage disposal works. He has had the following 
principal assistants : — 

Moses J. Look, . . Division Engineer, in charge of the construction work 

on the Wachusett Reservoir from January 1 to Septem- 
ber 30, when he resigned. 

Alexander E. Kastl, . Division Engineer, in charge of the construction work 

on the Wachusett Reservoir from September 30. 

Frank H. Trow, . . Division Engineer, in charge of work at the Wachusett 

Dam. 

Charles A. Bowman, . Division Engineer, in charge of force reports, mainte- 
nance and forestal work until July 8, when he resigned. 

Harry J. Morrison, . Division Engineer, in charge of inspection of removal 

of soil until March 7, when he resigned. 

Ernest H. Baldwin, . Division Engineer, in charge of work at Oakdale, re- 
signed April 1. 

Elliott Ii. B. Allardice, . Division Engineer, in charge of the river and aqueduct 

gagings, and supervision of the maintenance of the 
Clinton sewerage plant ; since July 8 in charge of for- 
estry and the maintenance of the Wachusett Reservoir. 

At the beginning of the year the engineering force, including 
those engaged upon both the construction and maintenance of the 
works, numbered 105, and at the end of the year 65. 

In addition to the engineering force, which included the engineers 
engaged upon the inspection of the work, other inspectors have been 
employed upon masonry and earthwork. The maximum number so 
employed at any time during the year was 5. 

There has also been a maintenance force, exclusive of the engineers 
mentioned above, averaging 208, employed in the operation of the 
several pumping stations and in connection with the maintenance of 
the reservoirs, aqueducts, pipe lines and other work. 

From time to time special gangs of men have been employed, 
under the immediate direction of foremen and under the general 
direction of the engineers, in grading and seeding the South Dike, 
in building a levee across the outlet of the Carvill ice pond, in grad- 
ing and seeding highway slopes, constructing roadway culverts, con- 
structing drainage ditches below the South Dike, repairing dams at 
the Canada and Unionville mill ponds and at Day's Mill in Holden, 
in cleaning weeds from the bottom of the Wachusett Reservoir, and 






METROPOLITAN WATEB 



[Pub. Doc. 



in forestal work. The foroe thus employed has averaged 43 through- 
out the voar, the maximum number for any week being 74. 

The office of the Chief Engineer and of the Engineer of the Sud- 
bury and Distribution Departments is at No. 1 Ashhurton Place, 
and that of the Engineer of the Dam and Reservoir Department at 
Clinton, Mass. The office of the Assistant Superintendent of the 
Distribution Department is at Glen wood, in Medford, and that of 
the Assistant Superintendent of the Sudbury Department at South 
Framingham. Branch offices for the engineering force were main- 
tained at Oakdale and West Boylston until November 21, and at 
the Wachusett Dam until November 28, when they were closed. 

Arrangement of Report. 

In continuing this report, it is the purpose to separate the work 
charged to the construction account from that charged to the main- 
tenance account ; but, as the work of construction and maintenance 
is supervised by the same principal engineers, and in very many 
cases the assistants are engaged upon both classes of work, it is not 
feasible to make a complete separation. 

CONSTRUCTION. 

Contracts. 
A detailed statement of the contracts made and pending during 
the year is given in Appendix No. 1. The following statement 
gives a summary of all the contracts charged to construction from 
the beginning of the work to the end of the year 1905 : — 



Portion of Work. 




Approximate 
Amount. 



Wachusett Reservoir, . 
Wachusett Dam, . 
Other portions of work, 

Totals, . 



$3,043,752 12 

1,748,257 92 

10,318,846 13 

$15,110,856 17 



Amount of 11 contracts made in 1905 (approximate), . . . $88,259 41 

Amount of 5 contracts unfinished December 31, 1905 (approximate), 1,906,075 00 
Value of work done by contract from January 1, 1905, to December 

31, 1905, 309,400 52 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 87 

In the case of all contracts completed up to the present time final 
settlements have been made without any legal controversy. 



DAM AND RESERVOIR DEPARTMENT. 

(The statement of the work of this department has been prepared by Thomas F. Richardson, 

Department Engineer.) 

The principal work of this department has been the construction 
of the Wachusett Dam and the South Dike, the construction of 
highways in the vicinity of West Boylston and Oakdale, and the 
completion of the removal of soil from the Wachusett Reservoir. 

Wachusett Dam. 

The design of the Wachusett Dam and the contract for its con- 
struction, which was made with the McArthur Brothers Company 
on October 1, 1900, were described in the annual report of January 
1, 1901. The plant provided for the work, and the methods of 
carrying on the work, both at the quarry and at the dam, were fully 
described in the annual report of January 1, 1902. There has been 
no material change in the plant or in the methods. 

The total length of the masonry of the dam is 1,476 feet, made up 
of waste-weir, 452 feet; main dam, including terminal structures, 
971 feet; and corewall, which extends beyond the terminal struc- 
tures at the easterly end, 53 feet. The length of the main dam 
between terminal structures is 838 feet. 

Following are various elevations above Boston City Base : — 



Elevation of edge of coping at top of dam, .... 

Elevation of flow line of reservoir, 

Elevation of original river bed, 

Elevation of lowest point of foundation not in cut-off trench, 
Elevation of lowest point in cut-off trench, .... 



415.0 
395.0 
266.0 
206.7 

186.8 



Work at the dam, which had been shut down during the winter, 
was resumed on March 13. Work upon the masonry, which was 
suspended on account of cold weather on November 28, 1904, was 
resumed on March 27, and the last stone in the cornice of the dam 
was set on June 24. The last parapet stone in the abutment and 
bastion was set on July 22. This practically finished the masonry, 
with the exception of the granolithic surface which is to form the 
finish of the top of the dam. 



88 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Main Dam, Cktte-chambers and Terminal Structures. 

WheD work upon the masonry was suspended, in 1904, the main 
dam had an average elevation of 396. A gap about 20 feet wide, 
through which passed two tracks over which stone was brought from 
the quarry, had been left through the masonry, the bottom of this 
gap being at elevation 369. A few of the coping stones of the dam 
had been set at the easterly end near the abutment. A large part 
of the terminal structure at the easterly end of the dam, known as 
the abutment, had been built, some of the string course stones at 
elevation 415.0 having been set. The corewall, extending easterly 
from the abutment, had been finished. 

As previously stated, masonry construction was resumed on 
March 27. It has not been possible or necessary to work as large a 
force or as many derricks on the construction of the masonry as in 
previous years. The maximum number of derricks in operation on 
the masonry of the main dam and terminal structures during the 
year has been six. All of the rubble masonry has been laid with 
level beds. The tracks through the gap in the dam were taken up 
on May 14. 

The six concrete piers for supporting the floor of the abutment 
have been extended. The floor, which is re-enforced with %-inch 
steel rods spaced about 7% inches apart, and resting on re-enforced 
concrete beams which are carried by the piers, has been built. The 
parapet of the abutment was finished, except for the tablet stones, 
during the week ending July 15. The tablet stones were set on 
September 16. The retaining wall, extending about 200 feet up 
stream from the abutment, was finished during the week ending 
April 22. 

The upper gate-chamber, the elevation of the floor of which is 2 
feet 6 inches above the flow-line of the reservoir, and the top of 
which coincides with the top of the dam, has been completed. The 
interior of the gate-chamber is lined with face brick and the floor 
has a granolithic finish. The steelwork at the top of the wells and 
of the roof has been put in place, also the concrete of the roof, w r ith 
the exception of the granolithic finish. An electric travelling crane 
for use in handling stop-planks, screens, etc., has been partially 
installed. 

At the terminal structure at the westerly end of the dam, knowm 
as the bastion, the interior of which is finished with concrete masonry, 




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No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 89 

the steelwork and concrete of the roof have been placed and the 
granolithic floor has been finished. 

The stone masonry of the top of the dam has been levelled up 
with concrete masonry to about 5 inches below the finished surface, 
preparatory to placing the granolithic finish, which will be 5 inches 
in thickness. 

The entire down-stream face of the dam, as far as it shows above 
the ground, and the up-stream face for 25 feet below the coping, 
have been cleaned with wire brooms and chisels. 

Waste Channel and Waste-weir. 

The excavation of earth and rock for obtaining a suitable founda- 
tion for the waste-weir was practically finished during the previous 
year, but it has been necessary to excavate a small amount of earth 
and rock in preparing the foundations for the small abutment at the 
westerly end of the weir. Considerable filling has been done on 
the reservoir side of the waste-weir, in preparing a foundation for the 
paving, the material being obtained from borrow pits in the reser- 
voir. About the middle of May the work of excavating from the 
waste channel, to prepare foundations for the Central Massachusetts 
Railroad bridge, w r as begun, the excavated material being placed 
in the railroad embankment. On October 7 work was begun, re- 
moving from the waste channel the earth and rock upon which 
the cableway towers had rested, this material also being used for 
completing the railroad fill. On October 23, after the Central 
Massachusetts trains began to pass over the permanent line of the 
railroad, work was resumed, excavating earth and rock from the 
waste channel on the location of the temporary line. This work 
was continued with a good-sized force until the end of the year, 
when there remained about 1,400 cubic yards of earth and 1,900 
cubic yards of rock to be removed. 

The work of laying masonry on the waste-weir was resumed on 
March 30 and was completed on May 6, although considerable work 
was done pointing and trimming up the crest of the waste-weir after 
that date. 

It was found necessary to recut the crest of the waste-weir for 
nearly its whole length, in order to have it true for receiving the 
flash-boards. Heavy cast-iron standards for supporting flash-boards 
have been set about 10 feet apart for the whole length of the waste- 
weir. The gross length of the waste-weir is 452 feet, and the net 



90 METROPOLITAN WATKK [Pub. Doc. 

length, after making deductions for the space occupied by the stand- 
ards, is about 11!> feet. The standards are arranged for carrying 
flash-boards 3 feet high, except for 100 feet of the waste-weir, where 
the creel is 3 feet below flow-line and the flash-hoards are 6 feet 
high. The Hash-hoards above the level of the full reservoir are pro- 
Tided to prevent the waste of water from waves passing over the 
crest o( the waste-weir. Each of the 4 Hash-board standards is secured 
to the top of the waste-weir by 10 bolts l 1 /* and \\< 2 inches in diam- 
eter, and also by a rod 1% inches in diameter and 8 feet long for the 
higher part of the waste-weir, and 10 feet long for the lower part. 
Each rod is secured to a heavy cast-iron anchor built into the masonry 
on the upper face of the weir, the rod being protected from corrosion 
by a coating of cement mortar about 1 inch thick. Fastened to the 
flash-board standards are steel trestles, on which has been laid a 
plank walk of Georgia pine 4 inches in thickness. On this walk also 
there will be placed a track for a small car, to be used in transporting 
the flash-boards from the crest to the storage room in the bastion. 

Above the waste-weir, for its whole length, is a paving of coursed 
granite, usually in 2-foot courses, and having a depth of from 18 to 
24 inches. This paving is about 25 feet wide, and is laid on a 1 to 3 
slope. Below this paving is a paving 18 inches thick, of uncoursed 
quarry stone, which extends to the original surface of the ground. 

The retaining wall, extending along the easterly side of the waste 
channel from the bastion to the railroad bridge, was finished on June 
10, and the small retaining walls above and below the railroad bridge 
were finished soon after. 

Arch Bridge for the Central Massachusetts Railroad. 

This bridge was not included in the original contract for the dam, 
but has been built by the contractor for the dam under a supple- 
mentary agreement. This bridge crosses the waste channel about 
225 feet below the waste-weir, and the arch across the waste channel 
has a span of 58 feet. The parapet walls of the bridge are about 170 
feet long, 16 feet 9 inches apart from outside to outside, and their 
tops are about 45 feet above the bottom of the waste channel. East 
of and close by the main span is an arched opening 10 feet wide 
under the railroad, through which passes the road to the bastion. 
The arches of both spans are built of Portland cement concrete, faced 
with granite. The parapet and wing walls are of granite masonry. 




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No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 91 



Finishing Grounds Above and Below the Dam. 

A large amount of work has been done grading the grounds below 
the dam on both hillsides, and above the dam on the easterly hillside. 
Large quantities of waste rock, dumped on the easterly hillside when 
the Wachusett Aqueduct and Central Massachusetts Railroad tun- 
nels were built, have been removed and the hillside covered with soil 
to a depth of about 18 inches. On the westerly hillside extensive 
grading has been done near the bastion, and the grounds have also 
been covered with 18 inches of soil. 

About 5,000 cubic yards of soil for finishing the grounds on 
the westerly hillside have been obtained from the reservoir near the 
South Dike, and transported across the valley by means of the 
cable ways. Part of this soil is to be used for covering the spoil 
banks made from material taken from the temporary line of the rail- 
road, and for covering the slopes of the permanent railroad embank- 
ment. 

Extensive fillings have been made at the abutment at the easterly 
end of the dam, to make a suitable approach to the dam and to bring 
the grounds up to the level of Boylston Street. Gravel paths have 
also been constructed and foundations placed for a wide granolithic 
walk leading from Boylston Street to the dam. 

On the easterly shore of the reservoir, above the dam, riprap \y% 
feet in thickness has been placed for a distance of 500 feet, between 
elevations 375 and 398. Considerable quantities of riprap have 
also been placed above the waste- weir and on both hillsides for a 
distance of about 50 feet above the dam. 

For draining the grounds below the dam 12 and 15 inch Akron 
pipes have been laid, connecting with which are 3 manholes and 12 
drainage inlets. To care for the water which falls on the lower face 
of the dam a paved gutter has been built on both hillsides, extend- 
ing from the abutment and bastion to the lower gate-chamber, and 
connecting with the pipe drains. 

Extending from each end of the dam to the bottom of the valley 
are flights of granite steps. On the easterly hillside there are 187 
steps, arranged in flights of 5 to 12, with granolithic platforms of 
varying lengths between. On the westerly hillside there are 177 
steps. The steps are 5 feet long, have a 7-inch rise and are 12 
inches wide, supported at the ends on concrete walls 14 inches thick 



92 



M KTR0P0L1TAN WAT ER 



[Pub. Doc. 



and about 4 feet 6 inches deep. The steps are anchored to the 
foundations by %-inch iron holts. At the top of each third flight 
of steps there is a drainage inlet, which is connected with the pipes 
which drain the grounds below the dam. 

A foundation 18 inches in depth of stone from the tunnel dumps 
has boon placed on the road leading along the easterly side of the 
valley to the limits of the land owned by the Board, and this road 
and the roads for which foundations were built during the previous 
year have been surfaced with about 4 inches of screened gravel. A 
road having generally a rise of 10 feet in 100 has been built from 
the grounds below the dam to the bastion. This road is built on the 
steep side hill on the westerly side of the valley, and is constructed 
of rock excavated from the waste channel, the rock in the slopes 
being placed largely by hand. The road is surfaced with about 6 
inches of screened gravel. Most of the slopes on the hillsides have 
been seeded. 

Amount of Work done and Materials used. 

The following table <rives the amount of work done to the end of 
1901, the amount of work done during 1902, 1903, 1904 and 1905, 
and the total amount of work done to the end of 1905. The final 
estimate for the dam has not yet been prepared, but the total amount 
of work done to the end of 1905, with the 1,400 cubic yards of earth 
and the 1,900 cubic yards of rock remaining to be removed from the 
waste channel, is, approximately, the total amount of work at the 
dam . 





To 

December 
31, 1901. 


In 

1902. 


In 
1903. 


In 
1904. 


Tn 
1905. 


Total to 

December 

31, 1905. 


Earth excavation (cubic yards), 


43,000 


31,900 


68,800 


59,900 


55,000 


258,600 


Rock excavation (cubic yards), 


24,370 


12,020 


18,800 


36,810 


7,350 


99,350 


Rubblestone masonry (cubic yards), 


28,486 


65,686 


69,139 


76,598 


12,012 


251,921 


Ashlar masonry (cubic yards), 


65 


684 


2,015 


4,905 


1,147 


8,816 


Dimension stone masonry (cubic yards), 


- 


58 


417 


830 


1,370 


2,675 


Brick masonry (cubic yards), .... 


- 


407 


231 


398 


- 


1,036 


Concrete masonry (cubic yards), 


- 


5,284 


1,906 


914 


1,621 


9,725 


Slope paving (cubic yards) 


- 


- 


- 


370 


1,545 


1,915 


Iron and other metal work (tons), . 


- 


582 


71 


46 


166 


865 


Roadways and paths (square yards), 


- 


- 


- 


460 


7,660 


8,120 


Vitrified pipe for drains (linear feet), 


- 


- 


- 


674 


1,986 


2,660 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



93 



There have been used in the construction of the dam since the 
work began 81,103 barrels of Portland cement and 182,480 barrels 
of natural cement. All of the natural'cement has been of the Union 
brand and a large proportion of the Portland cement of the Giant 
brand, both cements being manufactured by the American Cement 
Company of Egypt, Pa. 

The amount of cement used in the dam per cubic yard of each 
class of rubble masonry from the beginning of the work has been as 
follows : — 



Composition of Mortar by Measure. 


Barrel* of 
Cement per 
Cubic Yard. 


Cubic Yards 
built. 




1.43 
0.99 
1.07 
0.86 
0.78 


184 

179,706 

31,884 

8,927 

27,954 



The amount of cement used in the dam, per cubic yard of each 
class of concrete masonry, has been as follows : — 



Composition op Concrete by Measure. 


Barrels of 
Cement per 
Cubic Yard. 


Cubic Yards 
built. 


1 part natural cement, 2 parts sand and 5 parts stone, .... 
1 part natural cement, 3 parts sand and 6 parts stone, .... 
1 part Portland cement, 1%. parts sand and 4}£ parts stone, . 
1 part Portland cement, 3 parts sand and 6 parts stone, .... 
1 part Portland cement, 4 parts sand and 8 parts stone, .... 


1.38 
1.15 
1.36 
0.99 
0.70 


964 

18 

7,107 

1,464 

172 



Miscellaneous JVotes. 

When the work was started early in the spring the temperature 
at night was frequently below freezing, and all masonry built before 
April 12 was laid in Portland cement mixed in the proportion of 3 
parts of sand to 1 part of cement. From April 12 to May 27 the 
rubble masonry was laid in natural cement mortar mixed in the pro- 
portion of 2 parts of sand to 1 part of cement. After this date the 
small amount of rubble masonry remaining was laid in Portland 
cement mortar mixed in the proportion of 3 parts of sand to 1 part 
of cement. 



94 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

The largest amount of rubble masonry laid in the dam during 
any week was during the week ending April 29, when 5 derricks 
were in operation and 1,284 cubic yards of rubble masonry were 
laid. During that week about 45 cubic yards of ashlar masonry 
were also laid. The average amount of rubble masonry laid per 
day by eaeh mason has been 14.1 cubic yards, and by each derrick 
57.8 cubic yards. 

The stone for the ashlar and dimension stone masonry has all 
been obtained from the quarry of H. E. Fletcher & Co., at West 
Chelmsford, Mass. 

The maximum force employed by the contractor was during the 
week ending April 29, when 368 men and 43 horses were employed. 

Finish of Top of Dam and Terminal Structures. 

Early in the year studies were made for different designs for a 
stone parapet and for a metal fence to be placed on the top of the 
dam. The design adopted is a fence with round posts about 5 
inches in diameter, with bases 12!/2 inches in diameter, spaced 9 feet 
9 inches apart, connected by two rails 2^ inches in diameter. The 
2^/2-inch brass tubing for the rails of the fence has been furnished 
by the American Tube Works, and the brass posts and anchor bolts 
are being furnished by J. H. McCafferty & Co. of Boston. 

The w r ork remaining to be done on the dam is the erection of the 
fence on the top of the dam, the erection of gates at the easterly end 
and of a fence around the platform at the bastion, and the construction 
of the granolithic surface on the top of the dam, including the abut- 
ment and bastion. 

North Dike. 

The construction of the North Dike was completed in 1904. A 
day-labor force was employed for several w r eeks in the spring, trim- 
ming up and seeding the westerly half of the dike, the maximum force 
employed being 14 men and 4 horses, for the week ending May 13. 

For the purpose of obtaining the elevation of the ground water in 
different parts of the dike during the time that the Wachusett Reser- 
voir is being filled, 15 wells 2 inches in diameter have been driven 
at different points on the dike. The deepest well has a depth of 90 
feet, and the average depth of the wells is 52 feet. Observations 
have been taken of the elevation of the w T ater in these wells, and will 
be continued as the water rises in the reservoir. 




#, 









%Am «i*+*> 



i 
























3 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 95 

South Dike. 

The South Dike was largely finished during 1904, the earthwork 
being completed except for filling the gap through which passed the 
quarry railroad used in the construction of the Wachusett Dam. 

Opposite a portion of the dike the reservoir is 2 miles wide, and 
the face of the dike will be exposed to the action of very heavy 
waves. 

On May 4, 1905, a contract was made with the McArthur Brothers 
Company, contractor for the Wachusett Dam, to place the two grades 
of heavier riprap on the water face of the dike. This was placed in 
two layers, having an aggregate horizontal thickness of 17.5 feet 
4 feet below the flow-line of the reservoir, and a slope on the water 
face of 1% horizontal to 1 vertical. The inner layer of this riprap 
consisted of stones containing 2 cubic feet or less, and the outer 
layer of stones of more than 2 cubic feet, the outer or exposed part 
of this last layer consisting of stones weighing a ton or more. The 
stone was obtained from the waste piles of the quarry from which 
the rubble stone for the Wachusett Dam was quarried, and was hauled 
to the dike on cars and placed with derricks. 

The same contractor also constructed a breakwater across the out- 
let of the basin, formerly the Carvill ice pond, to protect a levee 
which was built by day labor. 

Work under this contract was begun on April 29 and finished on 
September 30, the maximum force being 32 men, for the week end- 
ing July 8. Under this contract there were placed 11,991 cubic 
yards of riprap, at a cost of $15,385.24. 

Arrangements were made with the contractor for the dam to fill 
the gap in the dike through which the quarry railroad passed with 
material which he was required to remove from the embankments of 
his quarry railroad. This work was in progress for about three 
weeks, with a force of 35 men and 15 horses. About 1,000 cubic 
yards of material still remain to be placed to fill the gap. 

Considerable work has been done with a day-labor force at the 
South Dike, grading and seeding where the tracks over which the 
riprap was hauled to the dike were laid, building a levee across 
the outlet of the basin, which was formerly the Carvill ice pond, and 
doing other work in connection with the completion of the reservoir. 
The levee, which is of soil re-enforced with gravel and protected by 



METROPOLITAN WATEB [Pub. Doc. 

riprap, has been built bo that the water will be held in the basin 
when tho water in the reservoir is more than 7 feet below high water. 
The area of the water Burface above the levee is IOV2 acres, and the 

water will be about 7U> feet deep. An iron pipe 24 inches in diam- 
eter, controlled by stop-planks in a concrete manhole, has been 
provided, by means of which the water in the ice pond can be drawn 
off if desired. This work was in progress from September 21 to 
November 1(5. The maximum force employed was 28 men and 4 
horses, for the week ending October 7. 

Relocation and Construction of Roads. 

The work of constructing and improving highways has been 
largely finished in previous years. During the past year a highway 
has been constructed along the southwesterly side of the reservoir, 
connecting West Boylston with Oakdale, the work consisting in part 
of improving an existing highway and in part of building a new 
highway. A broken-stone surface has been placed on 2% miles of 
highways in the villages of West Boylston and Oakdale, also on a 
short piece of Boylston Street where it crossed the old location of 
the Central Massachusetts Railroad in Boylston. The grading of 
Hoi den Street, at Oakdale, has also been finished and the highway 
has been surfaced with gravel. All of the above work has been 
done by contract. 

In addition to the work done by the contractors, a large amount 
of work has been done on highways by the day-labor forces, which 
included the grading and seeding of highway slopes, erecting and 
painting highway railings and fences in West Boylston and Oakdale, 
extending stone culverts, widening a high embankment on Worcester 
Street in West Boylston, constructing a concrete highway culvert 
and six pipe highway culverts between West Boylston and Oakdale, 
and paving gutters. The maximum day-labor force employed was 
43 men and 13 horses, for the week ending June 10. 

Contract 282, The Newell & Snowling Construction Company. 

Building a Part of Newton Street and improving Crescent Street, in West Boylston ; 
Dale of Contract, April 21, 1905 ; Amount of Contract, $4,812.25. 

The contract for this work, which included the building of a 

road extending about 2,930 feet from a point near the southerly 

limit of the shallow flowage embankment of soil near Oakdale to an 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 97 

intersection with Crescent Street, and the improvement of Crescent 
Street from this intersection for about 2,110 feet to Central Street 
in West Boylston, was made with McBride & Co., on April 21. 
On April 26 McBride & Co., with the consent of the Board, assigned 
the contract to the Newell & Snowling Construction Company. 
Work was begun on April 29 and finished on June 9, and consisted 
of grading for the road-bed, surfacing same with a layer of selected 
gravel and laying pipe underdrains. The culverts were built by a 
day-labor force employed by the Board. The quantities of work 
done were as follows : — 

Earth excavation (cubic yards), 20,914 

Paving (cubic yards) , 4 

Laying 5-inch sewer pipe for drains (linear feet), 2,266 

The maximum force employed was 55 men and 25 horses, for the 
week ending May 27. 

Contracts 285 and 286, The H. Gore Company. 

Surfacing Sections 1 and 2 of Highways, chiefly in West Boylston, with Broken 
Stone; Date of Contracts, May 23, 1905; Amount of Contracts, — 285, 
§7,856.09; 286, $9,790.48. 

Sections 1 and 2 are, respectively, 6,487 and 8,110 feet in length. 
The contracts called for surfacing with broken stone the highway 
beginning at the southerly end of the three-arch bridge over the 
Quinepoxet River, extending through the village of Oakdale and fol- 
lowing along the northerly side of the reservoir to the junction of 
Sterling and Lancaster streets, and the new highway crossing the 
Wachusett Reservoir at West Boylston village and extending from 
the west side of Worcester Street on the southerly side of the reser- 
voir to a junction with the highway first mentioned. Included in 
Section 2 was also a portion of Boylston Street in the town of 
Boylston, about 325 feet in length, located near the South Dike, at 
a point where the Central Massachusetts Railroad formerly passed 
under the street. 

Work on Section 1 was begun on June 2 and finished on Novem- 
ber 9. The maximum force employed was 27 men and 16 horses, 
for the week ending July 29. 

Work on Section 2 was begun on July 28 and finished on Novem- 
ber 4, except that a small amount of work still remains to be done 



METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

on Boylston Street. The maximum force employed was- 29 men and 
23 horses, for the week ending August 19. 
The quantities of work done were as follows : — 



Section 1. 


Section 2. 


6,511 


8,386 


4,297 


5,403 



Shaping road-bed (linear feet), 

Broken stone in place (tons 2,000 pounds), .... 

Removal of Soil. 

The work of removing soil from the Wachusett Reservoir has 
been in progress under the contractors Bruno, Salomone & Petitti, 
and McBride & Co., and was entirely finished early in November. 

The total amount of soil removed from the reservoir is 6,912,052 
cubic yards, from 3,941 acres, of which 151,647 cubic yards were 
removed from 84 acres during 1905. The soil removed from the 
reservoir has been disposed of as follows : — 

Cubic Yards. 

In road embankments, 471,221 

Filling shallow flowage areas, . . 1,149,917 

In railroad embankments, 131,781 

In the North Dike, 4,955,936 

In the South Dike, 160,895 

Placed in spoil banks, 17,367 

Grading grounds near Wachusett Dam, . . . . . . . 24,935 

Total, 6,912,052 

During the year 4,720 cubic yards of earth have been deposited 
upon deep muck, which has been covered to a depth of about 1 foot. 
In previous years 238,846 cubic yards were used for the same pur- 
pose, making a total of 243,566 cubic yards. 

The day-labor forces, under the direction of the engineering force, 
have performed the following work : — 

The final cleaning of the reservoir bottom, between elevation 340 
and elevation 380, of weeds, grass and bushes which had grown up 
since the original stripping of the soil or since the cleaning of the 
previous year, was done between August 20 and November 18. 
There were 1,460 acres of land cleaned, at a cost of $6,210, or an 
average cost of $4.25 per acre. Over a considerable area where 
the slopes were not sharp and where the ground w r as not rocky, the 
ground was harrowed with spring-tooth harrows, the grass, roots 
and brush being afterwards raked and burned. On other areas the 
grass, weeds and brush were mowed close to the ground, raked and 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 99 

burned. Much better results were obtained with the harrows, but 
at a considerably greater cost. The maximum force employed on 
this work was 70 men and 10 horses, on September 20. 

On both sides of the reservoir, near Sawyer's Mills, and on the 
southerly side of the reservoir, near Dover Pond, additional soil has 
been removed from the margins, the erosion of the water having 
caused the steep banks at these points to cave nearly to the limit of 
the original soil stripping. 

Considerable areas of the bottom of the reservoir near the upper 
end have been graded to secure proper drainage. Boulders have 
been removed from the Quinepoxet channel and placed along the 
edge and slopes of the channel. Levees and embankments have been 
seeded along the Stillwater River, and much other miscellaneous 
work has been done. 

Contract 257, Bruno, Salomone & Petitti. 
Section 10 of the Wachusett Beservoir % in Boylston and West Boylston. 

On December 27, 1902, a contract was made with Bruno, Salo- 
mone & Petitti for the construction of what is known as Section 10 
of the Wachusett Reservoir. This contract called for clearing, 
grubbing and excavating soil from some 700 acres toward the upper 
end of the reservoir, and at the beginning of 1905 the only other soil 
stripping necessary to complete the reservoir was that on a small 
area along the Stillwater River and on a comparatively small area 
near the South Dike, the soil from which was reserved for use at the 
Wachusett Dam. In addition, this contract provided for the con- 
struction of a new channel, chiefly in rock, for the Nashua River, 
at the highway crossing the reservoir at West Boylston ; for the 
excavation of earth and gravel from shallow portions of the reservoir 
at Oakdale ; for enlarging the channel of the Quinepoxet River 
west of the Worcester, Nashua &> Portland Division of the Boston & 
Maine Railroad at Oakdale ; for building a concrete dam across the 
river at the upper end of this channel ; for paving the slopes of rail- 
road and highway embankments ; and for covering with earth deep 
deposits of muck not desirable to remove. 

During 1905 all soil and other material has been loaded into carts 
and hauled directly to the place of disposal, the contractor finding it 
more economical to do the work by this method than by the use of 
cars. 



100 



M KTROPOLITA N WATEB 



[Pub. Doc. 



The total amount of soil removed under this contract was 1,273,- 
620 cubic yards, of which 269,366 cubic yards were used in highway 
embankments, 986,887 cubic yards in shallow flo wage embankments 
atOakdale, and 17,367 cubic yards were placed in spoil banks. 

The contractor resumed the excavation of soil on April 3, and this 
part of the work was practically completed on September 2, the soil 
having been placed largely in shallow flo wage embankments. Con- 
siderable soil was also used in dressing the margins of the reservoir 
near the Worcester Street crossing. 

The principal work under this contract during the year has been 
the enlargement of the Quinepoxet River channel and the building 
of the concrete dam at the upper end of the same. The material 
encountered in the channel excavation, much of which was hardpan 
with numerous large boulders, has been used mainly for facing the 
shallow flow r age embankments. Some of the material has also been 
used for building a bens along the Central Massachusetts Railroad 
above Oakdale and for surfacing Holden Street. The concrete 
masonry of the dam was finished on September 22 and the slope 
paving above and below the dam on October 14. Water was turned 
over the dam on the latter date. The slope paving at the Worcester 
Street embankment in West Boylston and along the Worcester, 
Nashua & Portland Division has been completed. 

A considerable portion of the bottom of the reservoir near the up- 
per end has been graded to secure proper drainage ; the margins of 
the reservoir near the Worcester Street crossing have been graded, 
and numerous cellar holes have been filled and covered with soil. 

Work under this contract was completed on November 11, ex- 
cepting the removal of a few small buildings and of the contractor's 
plant. 

The quantities of work done w r ere as follows : — 



To December 
31, 1904. 



For the Year 

1905. 



Total. 



Clearing and grubbing (acres), 
Soil excavation (cubic yards), 
Earth excavation (cubic yards), 
Rock excavation (cubic yards), 
Slope paving (cubic yards), 
Concrete (cubic yards), . . 



154 

1,193,208 

90,849 

16,943 

18,992 



25 

80,412 
80,666 

260 
3,193 

812 



179 

1,273,620 

171,515 

17,203 

22,185 

812 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 101 

The maximum force employed during the year has been 193 men 
and 69 horses, for the week ending May 20. 

Contract 283, McBride & Go. 

Stillwater River Improvement, in West Boylston and Sterling ; Date of Contract, 
May 15, 1905 ; Amount of Contract, $28,181.69. 

The contract called for the improvement of that part of the reser- 
voir along the Stillwater River, mostly above the Worcester, Nashua 
& Portland Division of the Boston & Maine Railroad. The work 
consisted mainly of clearing, grubbing and excavating soil from 
about 30 acres of the Wachusett Reservoir ; also of deepening and 
draining shallow portions of the reservoir ; of changing and enlarging 
the channel of the Stillwater River ; of excavating additional material 
and gravel for the protection of slopes which will be exposed to the 
action of water ; of building berms along the railroad and along the 
highway where it is close to the edge of the reservoir ; and of paving 
the slopes of portions of railroad embankments and elsewhere where 
necessary. 

The material removed has been transported to the place of disposal 
entirely by the use of carts. 

The quantities of work done were as follows : — 

Clearing and grubbing (acres), 19 

Earth excavation (cubic yards), 120,491 

Paving (cubic yards), 768 

Work under the contract was begun on May 24 and finished on 
November 11. The maximum force employed was 186 men and 60 
horses, for the week ending June 17. 

Relocation of Railroads. 
The principal part of the contract work upon the relocation of rail- 
roads was completed in 1903. As noted in previous reports, it was 
necessary to build a temporary location for the Central Massachusetts 
Railroad — a portion of the Boston & Maine Railroad — near the 
westerly end of the Wachusett Dam, in order not to interfere with 
the use of the travelling cable ways which delivered materials for use 
in the masonry of the dam. Early in July it became feasible to limit 
the movement of the cableways sufficiently to permit the construe- 



LOS METROPOLITAN WATEB [Pub. Doc. 

fcion of the arch bridge over the waste channel. The grading of the 
permanent line of the railroad was finished about the middle of Sep- 
tember, and shortly afterward employes of the Boston & Maine 
Railroad laid the track on the permanent location. The first train 
passed overthis track on October 22. 

Some paving has been placed along the Worcester, Nashua & 
Portland Division of the Boston & Maine Railroad; and the under- 
grade crossing near Oakdale, through which the contractor for Section 
10 of the reservoir hauled soil, has been filled. Additional gravel 
has also been placed in the berms along the Worcester, Nashua & 
Portland Division and the Central Massachusetts Railroad near 
Oakdale. 

The only day-labor work in connection with the relocation of the 
railroads has been the building of the false-work for the arch across 
the w r aste channel. 

Contract 195-A (245), McArthur Brothers Company. 

Section 2 of the Relocation of the Central Massachusetts Railroad, in Clinton. 

On April 18, 1902, a contract was made with the McArthur 
Brothers Company for the construction of what is known as Section 
2 of the Relocation of the Central Massachusetts Railroad. All of 
the work under this contract was completed in 1903, except the con- 
struction of a short length of permanent line of railroad in place of 
the temporary line necessarily used during the construction of the 
dam. The work included the construction of a masonry arch bridge 
to carry the railroad over the w T aste channel, the construction of 
short lengths of embankment on either side of the bridge, and the 
removal of the embankment of the temporary line. 

The contractor began the work of laying masonry at the arch bridge 
on July 5, and completed the embankment of the permanent line 
about the middle of September. On October 23, immediately after 
the trains of the Boston & Maine Railroad began to run over the per- 
manent line, work was begun on the removal of the embankment of 
the temporary line, and at the end of the year this work was prac- 
tically completed. 

The quantities of work done were as follows : — 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



103 



To December 
31, 1904. 



In 1905. 



Total. 



Earth excavation (cubic yards), 
Rock excavation (cubic yards), 
Tunnel excavation (cubic yards), . 
Rubble stone masonry (cubic yards), . 
Concrete masonry not in tunnel (cubic yards), 
Concrete masonry in tunnel (cubic yards), . 
Dimension stone masonry (cubic yards), 
Dry paving (cubic yards), .... 



25,500 
55,500 
18,800 

2,120 

2,360 

740 

140 



16,200 
306 

920 
170 

385 



41,700 

55,806 

18,800 

920 

2,290 

2,360 

1,125 

140 



The maximum force employed during 1905 has been 63 men and 



30 horses, for the week ending November 18. 



Improving Wachusett Watershed. 

Paved ditches with board bottoms, having an aggregate length of 
2,875 feet, have been built to drain the swampy ground below the 
South Dike and the deeper part of the pit from which sand was 
obtained for the construction of the masonry of the Wachusett Dam. 
The maximum force employed on this work has been 26 men and 4 
horses, for the week ending November 25. 

A ditch about 1,870 feet long has been dug to drain swampy land 
near the Lamson nursery. The dams in Holden at the Canada and 
Union ville mill-ponds and at Day's Mill have been repaired. Con- 
siderable other work has been done by day-labor forces in construct- 
ing filter-beds, cesspools and privy vaults. 



Forestry. 

The work of cutting out fruit, mature and undesirable trees pre- 
paratory to planting has been done over about 175 acres. The fire 
guard 40 feet wide along the margins of the land purchased by the 
Board has been extended through timber land for about half a mile 
near Oakdale. An area of 101 acres was planted between April 15 
and May 13, and of 147 acres between August 26 and October 14, 
largely with seedlings from the nurseries. Of the above, about 
67 acres were in heavy grass land, where four-year-old white pine 
seedlings were planted in rows 6 feet apart each way ; the remain- 
ing 181 acres were pasture and sprout land, which were planted 



104 METROPOLITAN WATEB [Pub. Doc. 

with three-year-old white pine seedlings, set at intervals of 10 feet, 
with sugar maple, hickory, chestnut, locust or oak planted between 
for tillers, where a suitable tiller (lid not exist. In doing this work 
the following seedlings from the nurseries of the Board have been 
used: 163,600 pine, 106,300 maple, <),K00 chestnut, 3,200 loeust, 
10,000 oak, also ;> bushels of hickory nuts. The cost of taking the 
trees from the nursery and setting them in the ground has been 
$4.!*f) per thousand trees, or $5.55 per acre. 

The following table gives information regarding land belonging to 
the Board above the flow-line of the reservoir. Outlying land and 
land along the Quinepoxet River above the road which formerly 
crossed the river to the Harris Mills is not included in this tabu- 
lation. 

Acres. 

Area of land which was forested when acquired, 1,431 

Area which has been planted with trees, . ■ . 937 

Area to be planted with trees, 483 

Area open and which will probably not be planted, . . . . . 300 

Area of marginal strip along shores of reservoir, 197 

Total area belonging to the Board, 3,348 

Four-year-old white pine seedlings have been planted at intervals 
of 40 feet along both sides of a public road near the North Dike for 
a distance of % mile ; and where trees planted along highways in 
previous years have died, they have been replaced for a distance of 
about 12% miles. Two and three year old white pine seedlings and 
three-year-old arbor vita? seedlings have been planted along 121/2 
miles of the reservoir margin ; and where trees planted in previous 
years have died, they have been replaced for about the same dis- 
tance. An additional row of arbor vitae has also been planted along 
about 20 miles of the reservoir margin. 

The total length of the flow-line of the reservoir, including 1.2 
miles around Cemetery Island, is 38.2 miles. Arbor vitae and white 
pine seedlings have been planted on the marginal strip along 27 
miles of the flow-line. Along the dikes, highways and railroads, for 
a distance of 5.7 miles, trees will not be planted; and there remain 
about 5.5 miles of the marginal strip to plant with trees. 

The necessary care has been given to the Flagg and Lamson nurs- 
eries during the year. There were transplanted from the nursery 
beds to the transplant rows at the Flagg nursery 52,200 white pines, 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 105 

5,400 Scotch pines, 81,600 arbor vitse and 12,300 Norway spruces. 
Besides the above stock in transplant rows, this nursery contains 
494,000 white pines, 2,000 Scotch pines, 38,300 white spruces, 
11,000 Douglas spruces, 8,800 Norway spruces, 127,000 arbor vitse 
and 8,400 birches, hemlocks, larches, and tamaracks in seed beds. 
At the Lamson nursery there are 22,500 maples, 3,900 walnuts, 
6,200 oaks, 2,400 ashes, and 15,800 locusts, and about 2 bushels of 
chestnuts, which have been laid away in sand preparatory to plant- 
ing directly in the field next spring. 

Engineering. 

In addition to the engineering work already enumerated and that 
necessarily connected with the supervision of the contract and day- 
labor work in progress, the engineering force of the Dam and 
Reservoir Department has performed the following work. Plans, 
specifications and estimates have been prepared for the construction 
of a new highway on the southerly side of the reservoir, between 
Oakdale and West Boylston, and for the treatment of that part of 
the reservoir lying along the Stillwater River. Elevations of the 
bottom of the reservoir, taken after the completion of the excava- 
tion, have been entered on the record sheets, and contour lines have 
been drawn covering an area of 920 acres, making a total of 3,420 
acres covered by these final records at the end of the year. From 
these record sheets tables have been prepared showing the capacity 
of the reservoir at each tenth of a foot between elevations 325 and 
370. Surveys have been in progress of the marginal line of the 
watershed, and the line has been surveyed for a distance of 38^2 
miles. The total distance around the margin of the watershed is 
about 69 miles. This survey has been connected with the system of 
co-ordinates of the Wachusett Reservoir by triangulation. Surveys 
and studies have been made for filter-beds for filtering the water of 
a brook which drains the village of Sterling, and much other minor 
engineering work has been done in connection with the settlement 
of claims and for other purposes. 

Cement Tests. 
The usual tables of tests of cements used in the dam and other 
works at the Wachusett Reservoir, and in the Weston Aqueduct, 
may be found in Appendix No. 2. 



L06 METROPOLITAN WATKR [Pub. Doc. 

SUDBURY AND DISTRIBUTION DEPARTMENTS 
Dbxtbb Braokbtt, Department Engineer. 
Tho only actual work done in these departments ohargeable to 
construction was the setting of a Venturi meter and the laying of a 
few lengths of 48-inch pipe at the low-service pumping station at 
rhestnut Hill. Studies and estimates have been made for new 
pumping machinery and a new pumping station in Arlington to re- 
place the temporary plant which was installed in 1899. On October 
2$ a contract was made with the Allis-Chalmers Company of Mil- 
waukee, Wis., for furnishing and installing during the coming year 
a horizontal high-duty pumping engine, capable of raising 1,500,000 
gallons per twenty-four hours to a height of 300 feet. A consider- 
able part of the time of the department engineer and his assistants 
has been spent upon matters connected with the suit brought by the 
cities of Maiden, Medford and Melrose for damages on account of 
the taking of Spot Pond, and in the preparation of record plans of 
work done in previous years. 

OFFICE FORCE. 

Frank T. Daniels, Principal Office Assistant until December 23 ; Benjamin F. 
Hancox, Jr., Assistant in Charge of Drafting Department since December 
23 ; Samuel E. Killam, Office Assistant. 

The following is a statement of the more important work upon 
which the drafting department has been engaged during the year. 

For the Wachusett Reservoir a drawing was made showing the 
paving for the North Dike, and one showing the location of the stone 
masonry railroad bridge over the waste channel. For the Wachu- 
sett Dam there have been made grading plans for the hillside slopes 
and for the Boylston Street approach ; detail drawings of steelwork 
for the upper gate-chamber and of steel re-enforcement for the 
granolithic surface of the dam, abutment, upper gate-chamber and 
bastion : detail drawings of stone curbing and of iron fence and jjates 
for the Boylston Street approach ; drawings for a granite balustrade 
to surmount the dam, which was not adopted; and detail drawings 
of the adopted design for a fence, consisting of cast brass posts and 
rails of seamless drawn brass tubing. Studies have been made for 
bronze tablets and for a fountain at the pool below the dam. 

Detail drawings, w T ith specifications, w 7 ere made for a dwelling 
house for the foreman at the Weston Reservoir. Forty-three record 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 107 

plans of structures on the Weston Aqueduct have been made, also 16 
record drawings of work connected with the relocation of the Cen- 
tral Massachusetts Railroad. Working drawings were made for steel 
manhole covers and granite manhole curbing for use on the Sudbury 
and Cochituate aqueducts, also record drawings showing changes and 
repairs at Beaver Dam Brook culvert and Waban Valley bridge. 
The whole number of finished drawings completed during the year 
was 134. 

During the year drawings pertaining to the works acquired from 
the city of Boston have been transferred to this department from the 
City Engineer's department. These plans, about 1,300 in number, 
have been examined, rearranged and indexed. 

The force employed in the drafting department numbered 8 for 
the first month, 7 for the succeeding seven months and 6 for the last 
four months. 

Samuel E. Killam has had charge of the general office, where 
the work is of a varied character, such as making miscellaneous in- 
vestigations and computations, procuring supplies and making blue- 
prints. Mr. Killam has also had general charge of the photographic 

work. 

Accidents. 

No fatal accidents have occurred during the year. 

MAINTENANCE. 

(This report has been compiled from reports prepared by the engineers in charge of the various 
departments of the works.) 

Rainfall and Yield. 

The total rainfall for the year on the Sudbury watershed has been 
42.31 inches, or 3.78 inches below the average, the deficiency oc- 
curring in the months of February, March, April and May, during 
which time the rainfall was 9.38 inches, or 6.29 inches below the 
average. As a result of the small rainfall at the season of the year 
when the greatest percentage is collectible in the reservoirs, the 
yield of both the Sudbury and Wachusett watersheds has been low, 
that of the Sudbury watershed being 26 per cent, below the average 
of the preceding thirty years, and that of the Wachusett watershed 
27 per cent, below the average of the preceding eight years during 
which records have been kept. 

Statistics relating to rainfall and yield of watersheds maybe found 
in Appendix No. 3, tables Nos. 1 to 11. 



108 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



8 roRAGE Reservoirs. 

The quantity of water stored in all of the storage reservoirs on 
January 1, 1905, was 15,638,100,000 gallons. Rains early in Jan- 
uary, aggregating about 3.5 inches, caused an increase of about 
4,000,000,000 gallons in the quantity stored; but on account of the 
low rainfall and cold weather after that time there was a lowering of 
the reservoirs from the middle of January until March 8. During 
March and April the reservoirs were filling, reaching the maximum 
for the year of 33,708,200,000 gallons, on May 1. From May 1 to 
September 3 there was an almost continual loss of storage, and on 
the latter date the reservoirs contained 26,758,900,000 gallons. 
On September 2, 3 and 4 about 6 inches of rain fell, causing an 
increase of 4,000,000,000 gallons in the quantity of water stored. 
From the middle of September until the end of November the stor- 
age decreased, but did not fall quite to the point reached early in 
September. During December the reservoirs were filling, and at 
the end of the year the quantity stored was 28,971,900,000 gallons. 

The following table gives the quantity of water stored in the stor- 
age reservoirs at the beginning of each month : — 

Quantity of Water stored in Wachusett Reservoir, and in Reservoirs on Sudbury 
and Cochituate Watersheds, at the Beginning of Each Month. 



Date. 



In 

Wachusett 
Reservoir 
(Gallons). 



In Sudbury 

Reservoir and 

Framingham 

Reservoir No. 3 

(Gallons). 



In All Other 

8 to rage 

Reservoirs 

(Gallons). 



Total 
(Gallons). 



1905, 

January 1, 

February 1, 
March 1, . 
April 1, 
May 1, 
June 1, 
Julyl, 
August 1, . 
September 1, 
October 1, . 
November 1, . 
December 1, 

1906. 

January 1, 



4,409,600,000 
7,549,200,000 
5,800,700,000 
15,371,300,000 
20,498,900,000 
18,350,600,000 
16,582,300,000 
14,951,000,000 
13,774,300,000 
16,208,700,000 
15,057,100,000 
14,628,900,000 

17,115,300,000 



7,912,500,000 
6,937,900,000 
7,011,700,000 
7,329,600,000 
6,678,900,000 
6,951,900,000 
7,853,200,000 
7,993,200,000 
7,877,600,000 
7,916,300,000 
7,847,800,000 
7,772,500,000 

6,831,300,000 



3,316,000,000 
4,432,900,000 
4,016,700,000 
5,715,300,000 
6,530,400,000 
6,916,700,000 
7,087,000,000 
6,489,400,000 
5,286,900,000 
6,106,600,000 
5,178,700,000 
4,662,000,000 

5,025,300,000 



15,638,100,000 
18,920,000,000 
16,829,100,000 
28,416,200,000 
33,708,200,000 
32,219,200,000 
31,522,500,000 
29,433,600,000 
26,938,800,000 
30,231,600,000 
28,083,600,000 
27,063,400,000 

28,971,900,000 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 109 

Wachusett Reservoir. — At the beginning of the year the water 
in this reservoir was at elevation 317, or 33 feet above the bottom 
of the 48-inch outlet pipes, and the reservoir contained 4,409,600,000 
gallons of water. On account of the small rainfall during the first 
five months of the year the yield of the streams entering the reser- 
voir was very much below the average. The highest elevation 
reached during the year was 349.63, on April 28, when the reservoir 
contained 20,697,900,000 gallons. From May 1 until September 
3, and from September 15 to December 6, water was drawn from 
the reservoir practically continuously for the supply of the Metro- 
politan District. At the end of the year the water stood at elevation 
344.06, and the reservoir contained 17,115,300,000 gallons. The 
only water discharged from the reservoir into the river below the 
dam was that required to be so discharged for the use of the Lan- 
caster Mills and others. The average quantity as measured at the 
gaging station below the Lancaster Mills was 2,309,000 gallons per 
day. 

Sudbury Reservoir. — At the beginning of the year the water in 
this reservoir stood at elevation 259.18, or .18 of a foot above the 
stone crest of the dam. The lowest point during the year was 
reached on February 14, when it stood at elevation 255.82. During 
March, April and May the water stood from 1 to 3 feet below the 
crest of the dam. Early in June it was raised to the level of the 
crest, and from June 10 until December 17 water was running al- 
most continuously over the crest of the dam, the reservoir being 
kept full by a flow from the Wachusett Reservoir. On December 
16 the flow from the Wachusett Reservoir was shut off, and at the 
end of the year the Sudbury Reservoir had fallen about 2 feet. 

A gravel driveway has been built from the head-house of the Wes- 
ton Aqueduct to the store-house at the northerly end of the dam, the 
loam removed in constructing the driveway being used to cover an 
unsightly rock dump below the dam. A large number of pine trees 
were set out on the grounds, 500 chestnut posts cut for use on the 
works, joints on the overflow of the dam repointed, a new capstone 
and a short piece of coping set on the retaining wall of the channel 
below the dam, and a new cesspool built for the house at the dam 
occupied by the foreman. 

The Marlborough Brook filter-beds have been in use throughout 
the year, and have filtered all the water received from the brook 



110 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

except for a few hours on January 7. The beds were cleaned in the 
latter part of Jane and early in July, and the natural beds were 
again cleaned in November, ('racks in the concrete channel dams 
were cut out and pointed, and a new connection with concrete walls 
fitted with stop-planks was made between beds 25 and 26. A 12- 
inch Akron pipe 718 feet long has been laid between a manhole on 
the Marlborough sewer and tilter-bed No. 20 of the Marlborough 
Brook filter-beds. By means of valves set in the manholes the flow 
in the sewer can now be diverted on to the filter-beds, in case the 
Btorage reservoir and tilter-bed on Farm Road should be at any 
time in danger of overflowing. During the past year diluted sewage 
flowed on to this tilter-bed on March 25, 26 and 27, April 6, Sep- 
tember 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7. 

Bight new stone bounds were set to define property lines along 
the Marlborough Brook, the brook was cleaned, and adjoining 
property owners who had encroached upon the property of- the 
Board by depositing ashes and other rubbish were required to re- 
move the same. 

Framingham Reservoir Afo. 3. — This reservoir was kept nearly 
full of water during the year, water for that purpose having been 
drawn from the Sudbury Reservoir when required. At the end of 
the year the water stood about 3 feet below the crest of the dam. 
The ceiling of the gate-house and the exterior of the shed and boat- 
house at the dam were painted. 

Framingham Reservoir No. 2. — This reservoir was kept practi- 
cally full throughout the year, the lowest point reached being about 
3 feet below the crest of the dam, on October 3. During the pre- 
vious week water was wasted preparatory to filling the reservoir 
with water of better quality from the Ashland and Hopkinton reser- 
voirs. Water was drawn from the reservoir for the supply of the 
Metropolitan District for a longer period and in greater quantity 
than at any time since 1898. Water was drawn from the reservoir 
to Lake Cochituate on December 4 and 5. The ceiling of the gate- 
house, the exterior of the shed and boat-house near the dam and the 
fence on both sides of Fountain Street were painted, 5 land bounds 
were set, a granolithic cap placed on the gate-house chimney, and 
the joints in the masonry of the chimney repointed. 

Framingham Reservoir JSfo. 1. — This reservoir was full and water 
wasted over the dam for the greater portion of the time from the 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. Ill 

beginning of the year until the latter part of June. During the last 
half of the year but little water was wasted. Water was drawn from 
this reservoir and discharged into Lake Cochituate on May 5 and 6, 
during parts of nine days from September 4 to 15, inclusive, and 
on four days from December 1 to 5. The gate-house ceiling was 
painted and the chimney repaired in the same manner as at Reser- 
voirs Nos. 2 and 3. 

Ashland Reservoir. — At the beginning of the year the water in 
this reservoir was 31.34 feet below high water. It rose to the level 
of the stone crest on May 29, and the reservoir remained practically 
full until early in July. Water was drawn from the reservoir in 
varying quantities during each of the last six months of the year. 
On September 3 its surface was at elevation 216.86, or 8.35 feet 
below high water, which was the lowest point reached during the 
last half of the year. It was 4.3 feet below high water on January 
1, 1906. The lower gate at the gate-house, through which there 
had been a small leakage for a number of years, was repaired early 
in the year. The exterior of the gate-keeper's house and the interior 
walls of the gate-house have been painted, and the walk on the dam, 
1,800 feet in length, resurfaced with gravel. 

Hophinton Reservoir. — This reservoir was 31.48 feet below high 
water at the beginning of the year. On June 29 it was at elevation 
303.92, or 1.08 feet below high water, which was the highest point 
reached during the year. The draft from the reservoir in the last 
half of the year lowered the surface to elevation 293, or 12 feet below 
high water, on November 29. At the end of the year it had risen 
to elevation 295.74. About four-fifths of the water drawn from the 
reservoir was filtered through the beds below the dam. One of the 
gates at the dam, through which there was a small leakage, was re- 
paired. A survey was made and 14 stone bounds set on the boundary 
line of land just below the dam formerly belonging to William F. 
Ellis and Levi F. Hollis. The filter-beds were cleaned as usual, and 
the southerly half of the roof of the gate-keeper's house was shingled. 

Whitehall Reservoir. — Water was -drawn from this reservoir in 
January, February and March, lowering it from elevation 337.29 on 
January 10 to elevation 333.27 on March 9. The outlet gate was 
then closed and the reservoir filled slowly, but did not rise to high- 
water mark during the year, although no water was drawn from the 
reservoir from March 9 until December 16, when it stood at eleva- 



112 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

tion 337.83, or 2.01 feel below the extreme level to which the water 
can be raised by the new dam. At the end of the year it hud fallen 
to elevation 337.27. 

Farm Pond, — The water in this pond was kept from about high 
water to 1 foot below daring the year. It was twice partially filled 
with water drawn from Framingham Reservoir No. 1, once in May 
and again In November. No water was drawn from the pond for the 
use of the Metropolitan District, and none was wasted into the Sud- 
bury River. The paving on the slopes of the embankment of the 
aqueduct where it passes through the pond has been relaid at points 
where it had settled or been thrown out of position by the action of 
the waves and ice. A galvanized-iron cap was placed on the gate- 
house chimney, and the chimney repointed. 

Lake Gochituate. — At the beginning of the year the water in the 
lake was 4.52 feet below high water; on March 27 the lake was full, 
and remained at or near high-water mark until the middle of July, 
after which date the draft for the supply of the District lowered its 
surface to 140.35 on September 3. The heavy rainfall at this time, 
and water turned into the lake from Framingham Reservoir No. 1, 
raised the lake about 3 feet ; but after the middle of September there 
was a gradual drop in its surface, and on November 29 it was 6.46 
feet below high water, the lowest point reached during the year. 
During the first week in December water was turned into the lake 
from Framingham Reservoirs Nos. 1 and 2 ; and on January 1, 1906, 
it was 5.68 feet below high water. 

The joints in the stone masonry of the outlet dam were cut out 
and repointed, the joints in the horizontal surfaces being pointed 
with elastic cement and in the vertical joints with Portland cement. 
A new 1-inch cement-lined water pipe, 281 feet long, was laid 
between the foreman's house and the barn, the foreman's house 
reshingled, and the driveway from the street to the barn resurfaced 
with gravel. 

The channel of Course Brook, through which the water flows 
when running from the Sudbury Aqueduct into the lake, was cleaned 
for a distance of about 2,400 feet, and the brush cut on the land 
adjacent to the brook. Twenty-five stone bounds were set to define 
property lines on the east shore of the lake. 

At the beginning of the year Dudley Pond was 3.34 feet below 
high water. The highest elevation was 2.13 feet below high water, 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 113 

in the latter part of April; and the lowest 4.14 feet below high 
water, on November 27. From July 21 to 26, inclusive, a total 
quantity of 20,800,000 gallons was discharged from the pond into 
Lake Cochituate. 

The surface of Dug Pond varied between .69 of a foot above and 
2.91 feet below the invert of the 18-inch overflow pipe. 

The Pegan Brook filter-beds were in use on 202 days during the 
year. All of the brook water was filtered with the exception of 
small quantities which overflowed on parts of 6 days, and all of the 
water from the intercepting ditch except on parts of 6 days. The 
total quantity of water pumped during the year was 235,317,000 
gallons, of which 158,020,000 gallons were from Pegan Brook and 
77,297,000 gallons from the intercepting ditch. The total quantity 
of coal consumed was 150,068 pounds, indicating 1,568 gallons of 
water pumped per pound of coal. The cost of operating the pump- 
ing station and caring for the filter-beds and grounds was $2,536.17, 
-making the cost per million gallons pumped $10.78. The filter-beds 
have been cleaned several times when necessary, also the ditches in 
the upper portion of the Pegan Brook receiving reservoir, and the 
deposit removed from the bottom of the settling reservoir for the 
drainage ditch. This reservoir had not been cleaned since it was 
built, two years ago, and the deposit was 4 inches in depth. The 
pumping machinery was painted, and a number of pine trees set out 
along the drive leading from the street to the station. 

Sources from which Water has been taken. 
An average of 71,877,000 gallons per day was drawn from the 
Wachusett Reservoir through the Wachusett Aqueduct into the Sud- 
bury Reservoir. An average of 30,742,000 gallons per day was 
drawn from the Sudbury Reservoir through the Weston Aqueduct 
into the distribution system of the Metropolitan District. From 
Framingham Reservoir No. 3 an average of 63,539,000 gallons per 
day, and from Framingham Reservoirs Nos. 1 and 2 an average of 
11,845,000 gallons per day, was drawn through the Sudbury Aque- 
duct to Chestnut Hill Reservoir. An average of 15,313,000 gallons 
per day was drawn from Lake Cochituate through the Cochituate 
Aqueduct to Chestnut Hill Reservoir. The Spot Pond drainage 
area furnished 310,000 gallons per day. 



Ill METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Aqueducts. 

The Wachusett Aqueduct has been in use 266 days during the 
year, [t was thoroughly cleaned between December 6 and 11. It 
was also examined at this time, and was found to be in excellent 
condition. The usual work of maintenance along the line of the 
aqueduct has been performed, and the grounds and appurtenances 
are in excellent condition. 

The Sudbury Aqueduct was in service on 359 days during the 
year. The masonry portion of the aqueduct was cleaned on April 11 
to 14 and April 19 to 22. The repairs made on the Waban Bridge 
in 1904 reduced the leakage from the aqueduct to a very small 
amount ; but during the extreme cold weather in January and Feb- 
ruary ice formed in the open spaces under the aqueduct to such an 
extent that it became necessary to operate the steam plant for about 
a month. While the aqueduct was emptied for cleaning, cracks in 
the invert were pointed from station 284 -f- 88 to 285 + 60, and- 
from station 642 + 24 to 644 -f 47 ; and in the arch from station 
284 + 95 to 285 + 65, and from station 642 + 22 to 644 -f 70. 

When the aqueduct was constructed, manhole openings 3 feet 
square were left in the top at intervals of about 1,500 feet. These 
manhole openings were built with a granite coping and cover which 
was covered with about 1 foot of earth; but, for convenience in 
obtaining access to the aqueduct, w T ooden curbings and covers have 
been in use for several years on a number of these manholes. During 
the past year the stone copings on 18 of the manholes have been raised 
to the level of the ground, and iron covers placed over the openings. 

The ironwork in the roof, as well as other ironwork in the Farm 
Pond gate-house, was painted, also a small shed near the gate-house, 
and the storehouse on the line of the aqueduct at South Framingham. 

The city of Newton laid an 8-inch sewer over the aqueduct at 
Gibbs Street, Newton Center, using for the crossing 72 feet of cast- 
iron pipe laid with leaded joints. 

The culvert which passes under the aqueduct near Grant Avenue 
in Newton has been deepened and enlarged by removing paving and 
underlying gravel down to the plank floor which forms the founda- 
tion for the sidewalks of the culvert. On the floor was laid a 2-inch 
layer of concrete, in which was embedded expanded metal secured 
to the floor with composition nails. The depth of the culvert was 
increased from 3.8 feet to 6 feet. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 115 

The Cochituate Aqueduct was in use 249 days. The interior of 
the aqueduct, with the exception of the siphon pipes, was cleaned 
on May 10 to 13, inclusive. The iron gratings and all ironwork 
below high-water level at the several waste-weirs have been painted, 
and the brass work in connection with the gate stems cleaned. 
Masonry curbings with iron covers have been built on 13 manholes, 
replacing wooden curbings which had been previously used. The 
surveys for locating the aqueduct and determining the position of 
property bounds have been continued, and 42 land bounds and 41 
alignment bounds have been set. 

The Weston Aqueduct was in use 302 days. The flow was stopped 
nearly all of the time from the first of the year until February 8, 
also from March 3 to 13, during which time men were employed in 
cutting out and repointing cracks in the aqueduct masonry. While 
the aqueduct was being repaired it was cleaned for its entire length. 
The work of cutting out and pointing fine transverse cracks, which 
was started at the very last part of the previous year, was entirely 
completed in March. The number of cracks cut out and pointed was 
724. In connection with this work, 319 1-inch and 1%-inch pipes 
were built into the masonry, and through most of the pipes cement 
grout was forced until all interstices were filled. 

The barn at the White place, in Saxonville, was repaired. A 
portion of the steep bank at the portal to tunnel No. 1 at the back 
of the head-house was sodded, and the remainder of the bank will be 
sodded in the spring if that which has already been placed remains 
in position during the winter. Sand banks near siphon chamber 
No. 2 were sloped and a large number of pine trees set out. Trees 
have also been set on the slopes of the sand banks west of siphon 
chamber No. 2, and in the borrow pits between siphon chambers 
Nos. 2 and 3. Two broad dikes with very flat slopes were built on 
the Bowditch estate in Framingham, to prevent the water from Bait- 
ing Brook overflowing and passing through a culvert under the 
aqueduct near Millwood Street. One of these dikes was about 180 
feet long, with an extreme height of 2.1 feet ; and the other 125 feet 
long, with a height of 1.7 feet. Two screens have been built and the 
frames set In the head-house of the aqueduct. A current meter 
apparatus was installed in the gaging chamber early in February, 
and during the year a large number of current meter measurements 
have been made for determining the flow of the aqueduct at different 
depths. 



ins 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Pumping Stations. 

Seventy-five per cent, of all the water supplied to the Metropoli- 
tan Water District has been pumped at the two stations at Chestnut 
Hill Reservoir; the remainder was delivered by gravity. The total 
quantity pumped at all of the stations during the year was 35,986,- 
230,000 gallons, or 1,024,140,000 gallons more than during the 
preceding year. The cost of operating the stations was $93,752.58, 
equivalent to $2,605 per million gallons pumped, which was 1 cent 
per million gallons less than the corresponding cost during the 
year 1904. 

The cost per gross ton of fuel used at the Chestnut Hill high-ser- 
vice station was the same as in 1904, at the Chestnut Hill low-service 
station $0.28 less, and at the Spot Pond station $0.04 less, than 
during the preceding year. 

Thirty-three tests have been made to determine the viscosity, 
specific gravity and burning point of oil used at the several stations, 
and 28 tests were made to determine the calorific value of the several 
lots of coal used. 

Coal for use at the several stations has been purchased as fol- 
lows : — 





Gross Tons. 






Chestnut 
Hill High- 
service 
Station. 


Chestnut 
Hill Low- 
service 
Station. 


Spot 

Pond 

Station. 


West 
Roxbury 
Sta'iion. 


Arling- 
ton 
Station. 


Price 

per Gross 

Ton. 


Bay State Fuel Company, bituminous, . 


98.44 


- 


- 


- 


- 


$5 28 


George W. Bailey Company, bituminous, 


90.85 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 73 


Metropolitan Coal Company, bituminous, 


391.57 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 50 


Dartmouth Coal Company, bituminous, . 


- 


578.28 


- 


- 


- 


4 37 


Metropolitan Coal Company, bituminous, 


- 


418.52 


- 


- 


- 


4 35 


Dartmouth Coal Company, bituminous, . 


891.96 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 30 


Merchants Coal Company, bituminous, . 


2,175.09 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 12 


Merchants Coal Company, bituminous, . 


- 


1,475.53 


- 


- 


- 


3 98 


E. B. Townsend, buckwheat anthracite, . 


18.10 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 58 


E. B. Townsend, buckwheat anthracite, . 


- 


92.25 


- 


- 


- 


3 26 


Dartmouth Coal Company, buckwheat 


80.20 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


3 11 


anthracite, 














W. M. W. Spring, buckwheat anthracite, 


435.80 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 11 


C. W. Claflin & Co., buckwheat anthra- 


71.50 


_ 


_ 


. 


- 


3 02 


cite. 














W. M. W. Spring, buckwheat anthracite, 


- 


555.92 


- 


- 


- 


2 89 


Dartmouth Coal Company, buckwheat 


_ 


114.21 


_ 


_ 


- 


2 85 


anthracite. 















No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



117 





Gross Tons. 






Chestnut 
Hill High- 
service 
Station. 


Chestnut 
Hill Low- 
service 
Station. 


Spot 

Pond 

Station. 


West 
Roxbury 
Station. 


Arling- 
ton 
Station. 


Price 

per Gross 

Ton. 


C. W. Claflin & Co., buckwheat anthra- 
cite. 

Bay State Fuel Company, screenings, . 

Maiden Coal Company, bituminous, 
Locke Coal Company, screenings, . 

D. J. Cutter & Co., anthracite, . 
Metropolitan Coal Company, anthracite, 
Peirce & Winn Company, bituminous, . 
Peirce & Winn Company, screenings, 


552.17 


394.10 


493.25 
442.57 


301.62 
53.57 


385.89 
197.58 
385.89 

197.58 

$4 59 

2 24 


$2 78 
2 52 
4 38 
24 
7 28 
7 17 
$4 51 to 4 98 
2 24 


Total gross tons, bituminous, . 
Total gross tons, anthracite, 

Total gross tons, anthracite screen- 
ings. 

Average price per gross ton, bitu- 
minous. 

Average price per gross ton, anthra- 
cite. 

Average price per gross ton, anthra- 
cite screenings. 


3,647.91 

605. 60 i 

552.17 

$4 25 

3 ll 1 

2 52 


2,472.33 
1,156.481 

$4 14 
2 87 1 


493.25 

442.57 

$4 38 

2 24 


355.19 

$7 26 


- 



1 Buckwheat. 

Chestnut Hill High-service Station. 

The water used in the high-service district of Boston, the city of 
Quincy and the towns of Watertown, Belmont and Milton, was 
pumped at this station. 

The following are the statistics relating to the operations at this 
station : — 



Total quantity pumped (million gallons), . 
Daily average quantity pumped (gallons), 
Total coal used (pounds), . . . . 
Gallons pumped per pound of coal, . 
Average head pumped against (feet), . 

Cost of pumping : — 

Labor 

Fuel 

Repairf, 

Oil, waste and packing, . 

Small supplies, 

Totals, . . « 

Cost per million gallons pumped, 

Cost per million gallons raised 1 foot high, 



Engines 
Nos.land2. 



1,381.48 

3,785,000 

1,985,452 

695.80 

120.87 

$4,700 79 

3,626 21 

573 95 

196 99 

213 57 



),311 51 

$8,740 

0.056 



Engine 
No. 3. 



481.82 

1,320,000 

424,881 

1,134.01 

128.01 

$648 93 

744 12 

640 30 

27 19 

29 48 



Engine 
No. 4. 



10,564.86 

28,945,000 

8,505,184 

1,242.17 

130.39 

$10,477 87 

14,789 61 

584 08 

439 08 

476 03 



$2,090 02 / 
$4,338 
0.034 



$26,766 67 

$2,534 

0.019 



Totals for 

Station. 



12,428.16 

34,050,000 

10,915,517 

1,138.58 

129.24 

$15,827 59 

19,159 94 

1,798 33 

663 26 

719 08 



$38,168 20 

$3,071 

0.024 



118 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

On account of an increase of over 9 per cent, in the quantity 
pumped, it has been necessary to operate the less economical ma- 
chinery to a greater extent than during previous years. Notwith- 
standing this, the cost per million gallons pumped at the station 
shows do increase above that of the previous year. 

The amount of repair work done at this station was considerably 
greater than during the previous year. The principal items were 
the repairs to the two Gaskill pumping engines, Nos. 1 and 2, in- 
stalled in 1885. The water plungers of No. 1 engine were turned 
and new composition packing sleeves made, which greatly reduced 
the slip of the pumps. On November 8 the straps on the fork end 
of one of the main connecting rods of No. 2 engine broke, causing 
extensive damage to the right-hand engine. Two new rods of im- 
proved design are now being made by the Holly Manufacturing 
Company of Buffalo, N. Y., and the water plungers are being turned 
and new composition sleeves made by the Lockwood Manufacturing 
Company, who also did the work on the plungers of No. 1 pump. 
The work of installing the new parts, and of making other neces- 
sary repairs, is being done by the regular employes at the station, 
with some assistance from the Atlantic Works. 

One of the lower Riedler valve seats in the pump of the No. 3 
engine broke on June 28. Temporary repairs were made so that 
the engine could be used, and a new valve seat and spindle were 
made by the Lockwood Manufacturing Company, but have not yet 
been put in the pump. 

A new Flather lathe was installed in the machine shop. A centrif- 
ugal waste cleaner was purchased for use at both the high and low 
service stations, and a considerable saving has been effected by its 
use. A new coal-handling platform was built, the derrick was altered 
and improved, and a new floor laid on the run-ways in the coal-house. 

Chestnut Hill Low-service Pumping Station. 

The quantity of water pumped at this station was 0.8 per cent, 
less than during the year 1904. 

The following are the statistics relating to operations at this 

Station : Engines 

Nos. 5, 6 and 7. 

Total quantity pumped (million gallons), 20,104.86 

Daily average quantity pumped (gallons), 55,082,000 

Total coal used (pounds), 8,215,258 

Gallons pumped per pound of coal, 2,447.26 

Average head pumped against (feet), 50.81 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD, 



119 



Cost of pumping : — 
Labor, . . . 
Fuel, 
Repairs, . 

Oil, waste and packing, 
Small supplies, 

Total for station, 



Cost per million gallons pumped, . 

Cost per million gallons raised 1 foot high, 



Engines 
Nos. 5, 6 and 7. 


f 15,157 44 


13,850 69 


1,555 05 


638 37 


618 61 


|31,850 16 


$1,584 


0.031 



The cost per million gallons pumped was $0,087 less than for the 
year 1904. This was principally due to the decreased price of fuel 
and a reduction of 4.10 feet in the average head pumped against. 

Spot Pond Pumping Station. 

At this station engine No. 8 was operated from October 28 to 
November 24, w T hile repairs were being made on engine No. 9. 
During the remainder of the year all the water was pumped with 
engine No. 9, the 20,000,000-gallon Holly engine. 

The following are the statistics relating to operations at this 
station : — 



Engine No. 8. 



Engine No. 9. 



Total quantity pumped (million gallons), . 
Daily average quantity pumped (gallons), . 
Total coal used (pounds), .... 
Gallons pumped per pound of coal, 
Average head pumped against (feet), . 
Cost of pumping : — 

Labor, 

Fuel, 

Repairs, 

Oil, waste and packing, 

Small supplies 

Totals, . . . . 
Cost per million gallons pumped, . 
Cost per million gallons raised 1 foot high, . 



189.55 
519,000 
190,381 
995.64 
119.05 

$719 23 

373 60 

63 89 

24 80 

35 76 



>1,217 28 

$6,422 

0.054 



2,818.20 
7,721,000 
2,374,510 
1,186.86 
129.52 

$5,879 25 

3,759 52 

522 22 

202 70 

292 32 



510,656 01 

$3,781 

0.029 



Totals for 
Station. 



3,007.75 
8,240,000 
2,564,891 

1,172.66- 

128.86- 

$6,598 48 

4,133 12 

586 11 

227 50 

328 08 



111,873 29 

$3,948 

0.031 



The cost per million gallons pumped was $0,106 less than dur- 
ing the previous year, due to an increase in the quantity of 



120 METROPOLITAN VYATKR [Pub. Doc. 

water pumped, without material increase in the expense of opera- 
tion. 

The low-pressure lower inlet valve gear on engine No. 9 was re- 
paired, causing the engine to run more smoothly. 

West Roxbury Pumping Station. 

At this station water was pumped for supplying the higher por- 
tions ofWest Roxbury ami Milton. 

The following are the statistics relating to operations at this 
station : — 

Pumps operated 7,522 hours 30 minutes; average, 21 hours per day. 

Daily average quantity of water pumped (gallons), .... 636,000 

Daily average quantity of coal consumed (pounds), .... 2,184 

Gallons pumped per pound of coal, 291 

Average lift in feet, 136 

Cost of pumping : — 

Labor, $3,152 88 

Fuel, 2,591 27 

Repairs and small supplies, 329 53 

Total for station $6,073 68 

Cost per million gallons pumped, $26,173 

Cost per million gallons raised 1 foot high, 0.192 

The quantity of water pumped was 132,000 gallons per day, or 
26. 2 per cent, greater than during the year 1904. The increase 
in cost of operation was 14.3 per cent. The cost per million gal- 
lons pumped was $2,626 less than during the previous year. 

One of the 54-inch vertical boilers was repaired by putting in new 
tube sheets. The work was done by the Atlantic Works at a cost 
of $169. A Westinghouse locomotive type air compressor was in- 
stalled at this station, for use in filling the air chambers on the 
pumps. 

Aldington Pumping Station. 

All water supplied to the town of Lexington and to the high- 
service district of Arlington was pumped at this station. 

The following are the statistics relating to operations at this 
station : — 

Tumps operated 8,755 hours 45 minutes ; average 24 hours per day. 

Daily average quantity of water pumped (gallons), .... 585,000 

Daily average quantity of coal consumed (pounds), .... 3,564 

Gallons pumped per pound of coal, 164 

Average lift in feet, 282 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



121 



Cost of pumping : — 

Labor, $3,207 18 

Fuel 2,326 20 

Repairs and small supplies, 253 87 

Total for station, $5,787 25 

Cost per million gallons pumped, $27,119 

Cost per million gallons raised 1 foot high, 0.096 

The quantity pumped was 68,000 gallons per day, or 13.2 per 
cent, greater than during the year 1904. The cost per million gal- 
lons pumped was $1.08 less, due to increase in the amount of water 
pumped, while the cost of operation did not increase in the same 
proportion. 

On July 19 one of the water plunger rods on the Blake compound 
pump broke ; a new rod was obtained and the damage was repaired 
in a few hours. 

The building was shingled and otherwise repaired. 



Consumption of Water. 

The daily average quantity of water consumed in the cities and 
towns supplied by the Metropolitan Water Works during the year 
1905 was 118,398,000 gallons, equal to 131.2 gallons per inhabitant 
in the district supplied. In addition to the above, 269,170,000 
gallons were supplied to the city of Cambridge, 4,000,000 gallons 
were supplied to the town of Wakefield, and 1,608,000 gallons were 
supplied to the United States Government Reservation on Peddock's 
Island, making a total so supplied of 274,778,000 gallons, equiva- 
lent to a daily average rate of 753,000 gallons. 

The consumption in the several districts was as follows : — 



Gallons 
per Day. 



Increase 

(Gallons 

per Day). 



Southern low-service district, embracing the low-service district of Boston, 
with the exception of Charlestown and East Boston, 

Northern low-service district, embracing the low-service districts of Somer- 
ville, Chelsea, Maiden, Medford, Everett, Arlington, Charlestown and East 
Boston, 

Southern high-service district, embracing the high-service districts of Boston, 
Quincy, Watertown, Belmont, and a portion of Milton 

Northern high-service district, embracing Melrose, Reveie, Winthrop, 8wamp- 
scott, Nahant and Stoneham, and the high-service districts of Somerville, 
Chelsea, Maiden, Medford, Everett and East Boston, ... 

Southern extra high-service district, embracing the highest portions of West 
Roxbury and Milton 

Northern extra high-service district, embracing Lexington and the highest 
portions of Arlington, 

Totals 



47,106,000 



570,000 i 



28,436,000 


827,000 


33,409,000 


2,799,000 


8,226,000 


233,000 


636,000 


132,000 


585,000 


68,000 


118,398,000 


3,489,000 



1 Decrease. 



122 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



The area of the several districts remains substantially the same as 
in 1904. The average daily rate of consumption for the past year 
has Increased 3,489,000 gallons. 

During the year continuous measurements have been made by 

means of Yenturi meters of the water consumed in each city and 
town supplied from the Metropolitan Works. From these measure- 
ments can be determined the consumption of water at any hour of 
the day in any city or town ; and in cases where the eity or town is 



Averagi tt<ite of Consumption in Metropolitan Water District and Average Tem- 
]n rature of Air at Chestnut Hill Reservoir for Each Week (hiring 1005. 

Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr May. June. July. Auq. Sept Oct Nov. Dec. 

7 14 21284 II 18254 II 18 25 I 8 15 22296 13 20273 10 17 24 I 8 15 22295 1219 26 2 3 16 23307 14 21284 II 18 25 2 9 16 2330 




7 14 21 28 4 1 118 25 4 II 18 25 I 8 15 22 23 6 13 2027 3 1017 24 I 8 15 22 29 5)2 19 26 2 9 16 2330 7 14 2128 4 II 18 25 2 9 16 2330 



Jan Feb. Mar. Apr. May. June. July. Aua. Sept Oct- Nov. Dec- 
Averacje Rate of Consumption for each week, thus !^^j 

„ between'l and 4- A.M. for each week thus I88S88 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



123 



divided into low and high service districts, the rate of consumption 
in each of these districts can also be determined. 

The diagram on the preceding page shows the average rate of con- 
sumption in the district supplied by the Metropolitan Works for each 
week during the year, also the rate of consumption between the hours 
of 1 and 4 a.m., and the average temperature of the air for the week. 
It will be noticed that the largest consumption of water occurred during 
the weeks when the temperature was lowest, and during the coldest 
weather the rate of consumption between the hours of 1 and 4 a.m. 
is abnormally high. This abnormally high night rate in cold weather, 
however, does not occur in cities and towns where water supplied to 
the consumers is metered. 

A comparison of the diagram here given with the corresponding 
diagram for the year 1904 shows that half of the increase in the con- 
sumption of water over that of the previous year is attributable to 
the increase in the amount of leakage and waste as indicated by the 
consumption during the hours from 1 to 4 a.m. 

The daily average consumption of water in each of the cities and 
towns supplied from the Metropolitan Works during the years 1904 
and 1905, as measured by the Venturi meters, was as follows : — 



Boston, . 

Somerville, , 

Maiden, 

Chelsea, 

Everett, 

Quincy, 

Medford, 

Melrose, 

Revere, . 

Watertown, , 

Arlington, 

Milton, . 

Winthrop, 

Stoneham, 

Belmont, 

Lexington, 

Nahant, 

Swampscott, 

District, 



Estimated 
Population. 

1905. 



596,170 

69,510 

38,180 

37,390 

29,270 

28,100 

19,720 

14,350 

12,930 

11,300 

9,710 

7,060 

7,070 

6,320 

4,370 

4,060 

1,840 

6,080 



903,430 



Daily Avebage Consumption. 



1904. 



Gallons. 



87,680,300 

6,228,300 

1,868,000 

4,260,500 

2,624,400 

2,823,200 

1,802,900 

1,525,100 

933,000 

623,600 

752,400 

316,300 

742,300 

558,300 

248,800 

282,700 

131,000 

521,200 



113,922,300 



Gallons 
per Capita. 



149 
92 
50 

116 
93 

103 
93 

109 
75 
57 
79 
45 

108 
89 
58 
72 



128 



1905. 



Gallons. 



89,743,900 

6,160,900 

2,019,600 

4,091,200 

2,592,400 

3,050,100 

1,921,800 

1,601,100 

1,006,800 

790,700 

787,700 

320,900 

798,300 

514,000 

266,300 

299,100 

136,600 

534,600 



116,635,900 



Gallons 
per Capita. 



151 
89 
53 

110 
89 

109 
97 

112 
78 
70 
81 
45 

113 
81 
61 
74 
74 
88 



129 



124 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

The figures in the column headed * Gallons per (\*i})ita '' for 1904 
are based upon a revised estimate of the population for that year, 
which has been made since the census of 11)05 became available. 

The estimated population of the last three towns in the list differs 
materially from that given by the census. In Lexington, owing to 
the large number who do not take water from the public supply, 
500 has been deducted from the total population of the town. In 
Nahant and Swampscott, on the Other hand, there is a large summer 
population which takes water but is not included in the census fig- 
ures. The estimated population of each of these places is therefore 
increased 920 above the population based upon the census figures. 

It will be noticed that there has been about the same proportionate 
increase in the consumption of water in Boston and in the remain- 
ing cities and towns taken as a whole, notwithstanding the fact that 
the cities and towns other than Boston have reason to be especially 
interested in diminishing the consumption of water, because, under 
the provisions of chapter 426 of the Acts of the year 1904, the 
measurements of the waiter used by each of these municipalities dur- 
ing the year 1905 will be used in determining the assessment to be 
paid by each in 1906. It would not be fair, however, to assume 
that the provisions of this chapter will not effect a saving of water 
in the outlying cities and towns, as measures are being taken in 
many of them to introduce meters on the individual services, and 
when these meters are applied, they will undoubtedly restrict to a 
large extent the waste of water in places where the meters are used. 
The consumption of water by each municipality for each month of 
the year is given in Appendix No. 3, Table No. 22. 

The autographic records furnished by the Yenturi meters continue 
to give information regarding unusual drafts of water, and assistance 
has been rendered to local water departments by notifying them of 
the increase of flow caused by leaks and by gates left open between 
high and low service districts. 

The consumption of w 7 ater in the cities and towns supplied from 
the Metropolitan Water Works, as measured by the meters, is some- 
what less than the quantity supplied to the District, as determined 
by pump measurements, and by the flow in the Weston Aqueduct as 
measured by a Venturi meter. This difference is in large part ac- 
counted for by the quantity of water used at the pumping stations, 
and by leakage from the pipe lines and reservoirs of the distribution 
system, this use and leakage not being measured by the meters. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOAKD. 



125 



Quality of the Water. 

Samples of water were collected every two months from seventeen 
points, and monthly from four points on the works, and sent to the 
State Board of Health for analysis and examination. Samples of 
water were also collected each week from many points upon the 
works, and examined microscopically and for color, odor, taste and 
turbidity by the biological force of the Metropolitan Water and 
Sewerage Board. 

The quality of the water furnished has been substantially the same 
as during the past three years, except that the microscopic organ- 
isms have been considerably more abundant, especially in the autumn, 
causing at times an increase in the amount of taste and odor of the 
water, but the taste and odor have not been such as to cause com- 
plaint from the water takers. 

The following table gives a comparison of the average results of 
the examinations of water from a tap in Boston for the years 1900 to 
1905, inclusive : — 



1900. 



1901. 



1902. 



1903- 



1901. 



1905. 



State Board of Health Examinations. 
Color (Nessler standard), 

Total residue 

Loss on ignition 

Free ammonia, 

i total, 
Albuminoid ammonia, \ dissolved, 
( suspended, 

Chlorine 

Nitrogen as nitrates, . 
Nitrogen as nitrites, . 

Oxygen consumed, 

Hardness, ........ 



Metropolitan Water and Sewerage 
Board Examinations. 
Color (platinum standard), 

Turbidity, 

Total organisms, .... 
Amorphous matter, .... 
Bacteria, 



0.24 

3.80 

1.20 

0.0012 

0.0157 

0.0138 

0.0019 

0.25 

0.0076 

0.0001 

0.38 

1.3 



34 

468 

97 

181 



0.24 

4.43 

1.64 

0.0013 

0.0158 

0.0143 

0.0015 

0.30 

0.0173 

0.0001 

0.42 

1.7 



34 
2.0 
243 

38 
162 



0.26 

3.93 

1.56 

0.0016 

0.0139 

0.0119 

0.0020 

0.29 

0.0092 

0.0001 

0.40 

1.3 



33 

2.3 
367 

34 
164 



0.25 

3.98 

1.50 

0.0013 

0.0125 

0.0110 

0.0015 

0.30 

0.0142 

0.0001 

0.39 

1.5 



35 
2.2 
286 

36 
126 



0.23 

3.93 

1.59 

0.0023 

0.0139 

0.0121 

0.0018 

0.34 

0.0110 

0.0001 

0.37 

1.5 



32 

2.4 
303 

36 
176 



0.23 

3.86 

1.59 

0.0020 

0.0145 

0.0124 

0.0021 

0.35 

0.0083 

0.0001 

0.35 

1.4 



28 

1. 

528 

37 
231 



Note. — Chemical analyses are in parts per 100,000, organisms and amorphous matter in standard 
units per cubic centimeter, and bacteria in number per cubic centimeter. The standard unit has an area 
of 400 square microns, and by its use the number of diatomaceae are decreased, and the number of 
chlorophycese and cyanophyceae are very much increased, as compared with the number of organisms. 



More than 8 per cent, of the water supplied to the Metropolitan 
District passes through Spot Pond, in which the color is, by the 
bleaching action due to long storage, reduced to about three-fourths 
of the color of the water supplied to the remainder of the District. 



126 METROPOLITAN WATEB [Pub. Doc. 

Biological Laboratory, 

On July 1, Burton G. Phiibrick, biologist in charge of the labora- 
tory, resigned, liis resignation taking effect on July 6. The vacancy 
was filled by the appointment on July 13 of Arthur W. Walker. 

During the year 2,595 microscopical and 604 bacterial examina- 
tions have boon made at the laboratory of the Board at 1 Ashburton 
Place, Boston. Of the microspical examinations, 1,977 were of the 
regular samples collected weekly from thirty-seven points and fort- 
nightly from five points on the works, while the remaining 618 were 
special examinations. 

In the Wachusett Reservoir there has been an increase, as com- 
pared with the previous year, in the number of organisms, but they 
were not such as to cause disagreeable odors. The average color has 
been much lower than that of the previous year. 

In the Sudbury Reservoir and Framingham Reservoir No. 3 the 
microscopic organisms, while quite abundant, gave no trouble. 

In Lake Cochituate the organisms were unusually abundant, and 
at different times during the year large growths of Synura, Uroglena 
and Chlamydomonas caused considerable trouble ; that of Synura in 
January, and Uroglena from May to July, were so abundant as to 
render the w r ater for the time being unsuitable for use, and the flow 
through the aqueduct w r as consequently stopped. 

The bacteriological work for the year consisted of routine weekly 
examinations, monthly examinations of the main feeders of the 
Sudbury Reservoir, of Framingham Reservoir No. 3 and of Lake 
Cochituate, and monthly tests of the efficiency of the Pegan and 
Marlborough brook filters. A total of 604 samples were examined. 

Sanitary Inspection. 

The sanitary inspection of the Wachusett, Sudbury and Cochit- 
uate watersheds has been continued during the year, under the 
direction of William W. Locke, C.E., Sanitary Inspector. 

There w 7 ere 13 reported cases of typhoid fever upon the Wachusett 
watershed; 12 in Holden and 1 in Princeton. In Holden 8 of the 
cases occurred at nearly the same time in August in three families, 
and at each house there was evidence that the well, which Avas under 
the house, was polluted from a defective sink drain. One of these 
drains, which emptied directty into a stream within the watershed, 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 127 

was at once diverted temporarily into barrels which were regularly 
emptied, until a satisfactory permanent method of disposal could be 
provided. On the Sudbury and Cochituate watersheds the total 
number of typhoid fever cases reported was 27 ; 12 in Marlborough, 
7 in Framingham, 3 in Southborough, 2 in Westborough, 1 in Hop- 
kinton and 2 in Wayland. 

The contract work at the Wachusett Reservoir is now nearly 
finished, which has caused the laborers and those connected with 
them to go to other places, and has permitted the removal of many 
buildings in and about the reservoir. The buildings removed in 
West Boylston in 1905 included 36 dwellings, 6 barns, 1 store and 
1 police station, a total of 44, which added to the 271 buildings 
removed in former years, makes a total of 315 buildings removed 
to date in this town. 

It is of interest to note that very little sickness developed among 
the laborers or their families during the eight years of contract work 
upon the site of the reservoir, and that there were only 12 cases of 
typhoid fever during that period. 

During the year the town of Holden has introduced a public 
water supply which covers all of the principal villages in the town, 
but as yet not many house connections have been made. When 
this system is in full working order, it will be much more difficult 
to maintain the purity of the water in the streams in and near the 
villages, and some action will probably be necessary in the near 
future to maintain the purity of this portion of the water supply. 

On the Sudbury watershed many men have been employed by the 
street and steam railways in double-tracking portions of their sys- 
tems, and short sections of State road have been built, all of this 
requiring special inspection to prevent the pollution of the waters 
by the workmen. 

At the Fay School, in Southborough, additions were made to the 
sewage- disposal system which should improve the conditions ma- 
terially. 

A new sanitary census of the Wachusett, Sudbury and Cochituate 
watersheds was beofun in 1904, similar to that taken in 1902 on the 
Wachusett watershed, and was completed during the year 1905. 
The census has been tabulated both by municipalities and by dis- 
tricts, and the results are presented in the following tables : — 



128 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



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No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



129 



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AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



131 






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132 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



A summary of the work of sanitary inspection for 1905 is given in 
the following lour tables. The first table shows for the Wachusett 
watershed the number of premises inspected, the classification of 
cases inspected, and the condition of the premises at the end of the 
year; the second table gives the corresponding information for the 
Sudbury and Cochituate watersheds ; the third table shows the im- 
provements effected on the Wachusett watershed ; and the fourth 
table the improvements effected on the Sudbury and Cochituate 
watersheds. 

The headings of these tables explain themselves, except in a few 
instances: under the heading " Premises Vacant " are included all 
cases which at present furnish no objectionable drainage, but which 
might furnish such drainage if the premises were occupied ; under 
the heading " Unsatisfactory " are included all cases where there may 
be, under the most unfavorable conditions, wash from privies or 
direct sink drainage, all suspected cases, and all cases of manufactur- 
ing wastes entering feeders, even though there may be some attempt 
at previous purification. 

In the third and fourth tables no cases are entered as remedied 
unless complete sewer connections have been made, or all proba- 
bilit}' of future contamination has been removed ; and no cases are 
entered as partly remedied except where positive improvement in 
the sanitary condition has been effected. 



Summary of Sanitary Inspections on the Wachusett Watershed in 1905. 







■ 

■ 

a 

u 
O ^ 

«- o 
<x> ov 

la 


Classification of Cases inspected. 


Condition 

at End of 

Year. 


District. 


M 
-§§ 

■ 2 

o » 

o >_ 

c-o 

go **-< 

at a> 

5* 


6e 

P 

■ . 

<z a 
O 


>> 

> . 

Cj 08 

M a 
Q 


> 
^ * 

* S3 

a 

h- 1 


o 

6o 

no 
5 £ 

O 
hi 

5 


o> 
a es 

53.2 

i - 
a 


OB 

5 

o 

3 

a 

OS 


60 

a 

P . 
§1 


a 

OS 

o 

■ 

s 

• 


>> 
[■ 

o 
*i 
e 

03 

■ 

"3 

QQ 


>> 

i* 
o 
*-* 
o 

03 

■ 

08 
OB 

C 

P 


French Brook, 

Muddy Brook, 

Gates Brook, 

Maiden Brook, 

Chaffin Brook, 

Asnebumekit Brook, . 

Muechopauge, 

South Wachusett Brook, . 

Trout Brook, 

East Wachusett Brook, 

Stillwater River, . 

Waushacum, 

French Hill 




80 

32 
130 

17 
150 
271 

95 

82 

47 
209 
148 
1642 

27 


31 

8 

71 

7 

33 

121 

34 

21 

5 

56 

42 

42 

13 

484 


1 
1 
6 

22 
12 

3 

2 

1 

48 


3 

2 

- 
2 

4 


1 

4 
8 
6 
1 
1 
7 
6 
7 


2 

3 

4 
26 

7 
4 

7 

2 

17 

1 


14 

9 

11 

1 

16 

25 

13 

3 

5 

22 

11 

19 


32 

24 
59 
13 

77 
96 
51 
36 
29 
108 
86 
65 
14 

690 


l 

3 
1 

1 
6 


14 

6 
2 

12 

11 
6 

14 
4 
9 
8 

10 
6 

102 


70 

31 

122 

16 

131 

226 

76 

74 

42 

186 

132 

125 

26 


10 

1 

8 

1 

19 

45 

9 

8 

5 

23 

16 

39 

1 






1,452 


11 


41 


73 


149 


1,257 


195 



1 On some premises there were 2 or more cases. 

2 Not including 206 summer cottages located near the Waushacum Lakes. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



133 



Summary of Sanitary Inspections on the Sudbury and Cochituate Watersheds in 

1905. 

























Condition 




ID 




Classification 


op Cases inspected. 




at End op 




a 

4) 

u 

Ph 




















<* Year. 




an 


cm 


;>» 


t» 


• 






00 


^_j 




>» 


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73 

m 


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60 

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c.2 


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.2 * 
CO .5 


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3 


04 


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Sudbury Watershed. 


























Farm Pond, .... 


237 


23 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


22 


- 


11 


235 


2 


Framingham Reservoir No. 3, 


72 


32 


1 


- 


- 


- 


34 


49 


- 


3 


69 


3 


Stony Brook 


289 


197 


4 


- 


3 


2 


49 


113 


- 


18 


270 


19 


Angle Brook 


1,966 


347 


8 


- 


4 


8 


153 


251 


1 


65 


1,882 


84 


Framingham Reservoirs Nos. 
























* 


1 and 2, and Cold Spring 


























Brook 


274 


92 


5 


- 


2 


- 


110 


113 


- 


30 


262 


12 


Eastern Sudbury, . 


242 


194 


7 


- 


2 


- 


48 


44 


2 


±1 


227 


15 


Indian Brook, 


420 


159 


9 


- 


2 


7 


170 


83 


- 


65 


386 


34 


Western Sudbury, 


184 


60 


1 


- 


4 


5 


78 


54 


1 


31 


155 


29 


Whitehall Reservoir, 


113 


22 


- 


- 


1 


1 


75 


37 


- 


13 


102 


11 


Cedar Swamp, 


810 


348 


2 


- 


1 


6 


97 


128 


1 


56 


791 


19 


Cochituate Watershed. 


























Snake Brook, .... 


320 


214 


5 


- 


- 


2 


93 


68 


- 


8 


296 


24 


Pegan Brook, .... 


907 


279 


8 


- 


4 


4 


78 


110 


2 


29 


876 


31 


Course Brook, 


88 


49 


- 


- 


- 


- 


29 


41 


- 


7 


86 


2 


Beaver Dam Brook, 


1,060 


210 


6 


- 


6 


4 


92 


183 


2 


22 


1,007 


53 


Dug Pond, .... 


498 


212 


- 


- 


3 


7 


42 


49 


- 


8 
377 


475 


23 


Totals 


7,480 


2,438 


56 


- 


32 


46 


1,150 


1,345 


9 


7,119 


361 



1 On some premises there are 2 or more cases. 



Sanitary Improvements effected on the Wachusett Watershed in 1905. 



District. 



Partly 
remedied. 



French Brook, 

Muddy Brook, 

Gates Brook, 

Maiden Brook, 

Chaffin Brook, . 

Asnebumskit Brook, . 

Muschopauge, 

South Wachusett Brook, 

Trout Brook, 

East Wachusett Brook, 

Stillwater River, 

Waushacum, 

French Hill, . 

Totals, . 




1 Including buildings burned, torn down or removed. 



i:;-l 



METROPOLITAN WATKK 



[Pub. Doc. 



Sanitary Improvements effected on the Sudbury and Cochituate Watersheds 

in 1905. 



DlHTlilCT. 



Remedied by 
Sewer 

Connection. 



Otherwise 
remedied. 1 



Partly 
remedied. 



Cesspools 

abandoned 

on Account of 

Sewer 
Connections. 



Sudbury Watershed. 

Farm Pond 

Framlngham Reservoir No. 3, 
Stony Brook, .... 
Angle Brook 



Framingham Reservoirs Nos. 1 and 2, and 

Cold Spring Brook. 
Eastern Sudbury, 



Indian Brook, . 
Western Sudbury, . 
Whitehall Reservoir, 
Cedar Swamp, . 



Cochituate Watershed. 
Snake Brook, . 

Pegan Brook, 

Course Brook, . 
Beaver Dam Brook, . 
Dug Pond, . 

Totals 



12 



42 



44 

34 
20 



161 



5 
8 

11 



10 



61 



41 



37 



19 



144 



1 Including buildings burned, torn down or removed. 

Considerable work has been done upon the Wachusett watershed 
in the building of new cesspools and cemented vaults, as well as by 
the removal of buildings, already noted. A total of 74 cases were 
remedied and 48 new cesspools were dug. 

The making of sewer connections in the various towns has pro- 
gressed somewhat faster than in the past. 

In Natick fixtures were installed and sewer connections made with 
64 houses, against 51 the preceding year, and there are now 718 
houses connected with the sewer. 

In South Framingham 46 houses have been connected with the 
sewer, against 45 the preceding year, making a total of 911 houses 
connected with the sewer. 

In Marlborough there have been 45 connections, against 35 the pre- 
ceding year. There are now 1,398 houses connected with the sewer. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 135 

In Westborough 9 connections were made this year, against 13 
the preceding year, and to date only 295 premises have sewer con- 
nections. 

Drainage of Swamps. 

On the ditches tributary to the open channel it has been necessary 
during the year to replace 15 wooden bridges across the ditches and 
to repair 2 others, at a total cost of $220. The usual work at these 
ditches has been done by the regular attendants. 

The drainage ditches in the vicinity of the Sudbury Reservoir 
were cleaned twice during the year, and in August the brush was 
cut for a width of about 10 feet on each side of the ditches. 

Distributing Reservoirs. 
The distributing reservoirs maintained by the Board are the Wes- 
ton and Chestnut Hill reservoirs, the Waban Hill and Forbes Hill 
reservoirs and the Forbes Hill standpipe of the southern high-ser- 
vice system ; Spot Pond and the Mystic Reservoir, near Tufts Col- 
lege, of the northern low-service system ; the Fells and Bear Hill 
reservoirs of the northern high-service system ; and the Arlington 
standpipe of the northern extra high-service system. 

Weston Reservoir. 

The grounds about the reservoir have been kept in good order. 
The old Upham house on Ash Street was extensively repaired, and 
has been occupied since September by one of the employes. 

Chestnut Hill Reservoir. 

In addition to the usual care of the gate-houses and grounds, re- 
pairs have been made at this reservoir as follows : about 30 square 
yards of granolithic walk were laid in front of the low-service station, 
to replace that damaged by the break in the 30-inch pipe line in 
February, 1904. About 2,650 linear feet of gravel walks around the 
reservoir were rebuilt. The lawn in front of the pumping stations 
and the great circle between the basins were dug up and reseeded in 
the fall. A considerable amount of work was done repairing windows 
and setting glass in effluent gate-houses Nos. 1 and 2 and the terminal 
chamber. The ironwork was cleaned and painted in the influent and 
intermediate gate-houses, in the small gate-house over the Cochituate 



L36 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Aqueduct on Reservoir Lane, and In the screen-chamber in the h.igh- 
Bervioe station. Gypsy moths in large numbers made their first 
appearance here, and much time was spent in destroying their nests. 
More brown-tail moths were found than in any previous year. 

Waban Hill Reservoir. 
The reservoir and gate-house are in good condition. The banks 
of the reservoir have been loamed, seeded and rolled, and the iron- 
work in the gate-house has been cleaned and painted. 

Forbes Hill Reservoir and Standpipe. 
The woodwork and the ironwork of the tower and reservoir gate- 
chamber, and the iron railing around the reservoir, have been kept 
painted by the attendant. 

Spot Pond. 

While repairs were being made to the Weston Aqueduct, water 
was drawn from the pond for the supply of the District from Janu- 
ary 25 to February 20, and the water fell to about 4 feet below 
high water ; on April 1 it had risen to within 6 inches of high 
water. During repairs to the Sudbury Aqueduct, water was drawn 
from the pond from April 11 to April 23, and the water fell to 
about 2 feet below high water. From the middle of May until the 
end of the year the pond has remained at or near high water except 
from September 2 to September 9, when heavy rains caused it to 
rise about 6 inches above high water. The reservoir and grounds 
about the pumping station are in good condition. The Bottume 
house has been repaired, and is now occupied by the foreman. In 
the meadow off South Street, Stoneham, 130 feet of 5-inch tile drain 
were laid, to replace 3-inch which had proved too small. For the 
double purpose of improving the character of the wooded areas and of 
reducing the number of trees to be protected from gypsy and brown- 
tail moths, a large number of trees on the thickly wooded areas have 
been cut down. About 563 cords of wood and 253 logs were cut 
and piled. Between February 24 and July 21 creosote was applied 
to the egg clusters of the gypsy moth, and bands of burlap and of 
tanglefoot were placed around the trees, and the foliage was sprayed 
with disparene. A large number of caterpillars, however, appeared 
in the spring from off the ground, due, probably, to broken egg 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 137 

clusters accidentally scraped from the trees which were cut down 
during the winter. Tanglefoot was applied to each tree as soon as 
the new caterpillars were discovered, but not soon enough to prevent 
thousands from getting into the trees. At several points windrows 
of hay sprinkled with gas oil were used to prevent the caterpillars 
from entering the property of the Board from surrounding land 
which had not been protected. As a result of these measures, the 
foliage on the trees on the land of the Board was injured but very 
little, and showed a marked contrast to that on adjoining property. 

Mystic Reservoir. 

The reservoir had not been cleaned for thirteen years, and on 
September 16 it was shut off and drained for that purpose. With 
the exception of two cracks, the brick lining was found to be in good 
condition. An accumulation of about 3 inches of silt was found on 
the bottom of the two basins, 260 cubic yards of which was hoisted 
out and spread on the banks, and the remainder washed out through 
the drain. The cement covering on the 30-inch pipe through the 
easterly basin was found to be badly cracked, and was removed, 
the pipe cleaned, painted with vulcanite and again covered with a 
mixture of 1 part of Portland cement to 3 parts of sand. The work 
of refilling began on October 6, the reservoir having been shut off 
for nineteen days. In addition to the silt from the reservoir, 19 
cords of manure was spread upon the banks. The tin roof of the 
gate-house has been extensively repaired and the exterior painted, 
the stonework of the reservoir partially repointed, and the trees 
cleared of moths. A local police officer was on duty on Sunday 
afternoons and evenings during May and June, to assist the attend- 
ant in preserving order. 

Fells and Bear Hill Reservoirs. 

In order to keep out the rain, metal tops were placed on the 
chimneys on the gate-houses at both reservoirs. The reservoirs, 
with their gate-houses and grounds, are in good order. 

Arlington Standpipe. 
The standpipe has been in service throughout the entire year. 



METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Mystic Lake. 
The water in the lake was kept from 2% to 3 feet below high 
water from the first of January until the last of April. From this 
time until the end of the year it was kept from 1\<, to 2 feet below 
high water, and on January 1, 1906, stood at elevation 15.50 above 
Boston City Base, or iy 2 feet below high-water mark. The work 
here has consisted principally of destroying moths, cutting and 
burning underbrush and repairing tishway. The Medford Boat Club 
has had shingled the roofs of the buildings which they use for the 
storage of boats. 

Pipe Lines. 

Sixteen leaks were repaired on the pipes, at a cost of $474.95. 
The only break in the pipe lines occurred on October 28, near the 
low-service pumping station at Chestnut Hill, in the 36-inch force 
main to Fisher Hill Reservoir. The repairing of this break, which 
was caused by uneven settlement, cost $180.78, exclusive of the 
work remaining to be done on the lawn and walk. 

The supply pipe line was out of service from March 5 to March 
14, w T hile masons were working in the Weston Aqueduct. The 
river crossings w 7 ere tested in the spring and fall as usual, and in 
October it was necessary to secure the services of a diver to repair 
four joints in the Mystic River and one joint in the Charles River 
which were found to be leaking badly. 

In order to allow shutting off the supply to Orient Heights, when 
necessary, without interfering with the flow to Winthrop, a 12-inch 
valve was placed in the line at Atlantic and Crescent avenues, Re- 
vere. The work of making connections between the pump in the 
low-service station at Chestnut Hill and the 36-inch force main to 
Fisher Hill Reservoir was begun early in November, and is still in 
progress. Considerable work was done on valve chambers to make 
them conform to the new grades established for streets in various 
parts of the Metropolitan District. 

All the pipe bridges with the exception of the Western Avenue 
bridge over the Saugus River have been cleaned and painted, and 
the stonew 7 ork in the abutments of the Mystic River pipe bridge was 
repointed. 

Twenty-one recording pressure gages are now in use, connected 
with the distribution system at different points. The average maxi- 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 139 

mum and minimum elevations of the water, due to the pressure at 
seventeen points in different parts of the District, are given in Ap- 
pendix No. 3, Table No. 38. 

Metered Connections. 

The number of metered connections with the main pipes of cities 
and towns in service in the Metropolitan Water District, on January 
1, 1906, was 56, 2 having been added during the vear. Of these 
connections, 54 are supplied through Venturi meters and 2 through 
the ordinary form of water meter. Two new meters have been 
added during the year, one on the main supplying Stoneham, and 
another on the main supplying Breed's Island high-service. The 
first of these was a Venturi meter, having a 12-inch tube with a 4-inch 
throat; and the other was a 3-inch Hersey disc meter, set in a by- 
pass of small diameter, a large emergency flow being provided for 
by a weighted check valve placed in the 12-inch pipe from which the 
meter by-pass was taken. The 20-inch Venturi meter at Webster 
Avenue and Newton Street, Somerville, was replaced with a 24-inch 
meter. 

The outside operation and maintenance have continued to be cared 
for by two men, who, besides the work of reading and winding the 
registers, have cleaned, oiled, painted and repaired the registers 
and chambers. 

As no further trouble from freezing of the water in the registers 
was experienced with the seven meter tanks treated last year with 
an insulated coating of pitch and cork, six more tanks, with which 
similar trouble had been experienced, have been treated in like man- 
ner. This work was done by the maintenance force, at a cost of 
about $48.50 per chamber, or $21.50 less per chamber than last year. 

Electrolysis. 

Investigations of the electrical conditions surrounding the pipes in 
the Distribution System have been continued during the year. A 
complete voltmeter survey of the entire district was made about 
April 1, and another about November 1. A large number of mis- 
cellaneous investigations have also been conducted in connection 
with experimental work pertaining to electrolysis of water pipes. 
The distribution and magnitude of the differences of electrical po- 
tential, or electrical pressures, and of the electric currents flowing on 



lio METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

the pipes, which result from these pressures and produce the dis- 
integration of the pipes, have been obtained from the voltmeter 
Burveys, 

With the exception of the change produced artificially l>} r setting 
the insulation joints on the two 48-inch low-service pipe lines con- 
neoting the Chestnut Hill pumping station and Spot Pond, the elec- 
trical conditions have remained about the same as during 1904. 

There has probably been a slight increase in the rate of disintegra- 
tion of the pipes in the vicinity of the power stations in Chelsea and 
Lynn, this year. A thorough examination of the pipes in these dis- 
tricts was made in 1903, and about 600 feet of 12-inch pipe line in 
the vicinity of the Lynn power station, which had been the most 
seriously damaged by electrolysis, was relaid with new pipe last 
year. No excavations have been made to determine the conditions 
of these pipes this year, as it is difficult to determine definitely the 
amount of injury done in a short interval of time. 

The electrical conditions surrounding our 20-inch pipe in Main 
Street, Stoneham, and 12-inch pipe in West Street, Hyde Park, 
tend to cause the disintegration of the pipes. An examination of 
the pipe in West Street, Hyde Park, was made in June, 1904; and 
it was found that, on account of the pipes being surrounded by dry, 
gravelly soil, the electrolytic action was quite uniformly distributed 
over the entire pipe surface, and the pittings were not very deep at 
any point. As the soil conditions in Main Street, Stoneham, are 
quite similar to those in Hyde Park, no attempt has been made to 
determine the extent of the deterioration of the 20-inch pipes at this 
place this year, as it is probable that it will be several years before 
the disintegration of the iron will cause them to be unsafe. 

At the close of last year the w T ork of setting insulation joints at 
several points on the pipe lines in the district covered by the Boston 
Elevated Railway Company was in progress, and four of the joints 
had been set in the westerly 48-inch pipe line connecting Chestnut 
Hill pumping station and Spot Pond. 

In January of this year insulation joints were set at two points on 
the easterly 48-inch pipe line connecting Chestnut Hill pumping 
station and Spot Pond. These joints were set on the electrically 
positive side of the Charles and Mystic rivers, for the purpose of 
reversing the polarity of the pipes submerged under these rivers, 
so that the pipes would be negative instead of positive to the sur- 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 141 

rounding earth and water, with the result that the electricity would 
flow on to them from the earth without causing damage, instead 
of flowing from them into the earth, and causing a disintegration of 
the iron. 

The joints are located in Middlesex Avenue, Medford, at a point 
about 2,100 feet north of the shore of the Mystic River, and in land 
of the Commonwealth which was a portion of the Francis estate in 
Boston, at a point about 200 feet south of the shore of the Charles 
River. 

The setting of these joints completed all the work which had been 
planned, for experimental purposes, under an agreement with the 
Boston Elevated Railway Company. The total cost of setting these 
joints at the six points on the two 48-inch pipe lines was $3,700.80. 

In the last annual report certain conclusions were drawn from a 
necessarily rather incomplete investigation of the effect of the insu- 
lation joints which had been set. Complete investigations made 
during this year have, however, confirmed the conclusions reached 
last year. 

Investigations made this year show that the reversal of the elec- 
trical condition of the pipe lines under the Charles and Mystic 
rivers has been accomplished as anticipated, as these sections of the 
pipe lines are now receiving about 35 amperes of electricity, instead 
of losing about 60 amperes, as formerly. 

On the portions of the pipe lines directly affected by the insula- 
tion joints there has been a substantial reduction in the amount of 
electricity leaving the pipes in wet ground and in the total amount 
of electricity leaving the pipe lines, but the currents remaining on 
the pipes are still of such magnitude as to cause serious injury at 
many points. 

By creating new positive districts the joints have caused a dis- 
tribution of the damage over many portions of the pipe systems 
where it will be more difficult to locate it, and in a measure have 
destroyed the benefit which resulted from connecting the positive 
bus-bar to the railway feed wires, which was done several years ago, 
so as to concentrate the injury to the pipes in the district near the 
power station, where it could be most easily located. 

No extensive examination has been made of the pipe lines in any 
of these new positive districts on the positive side of the insulation 
joints where damage is expected from electrolysis, due to the differ- 



L42 METROPOLITAN WATEB [Pub. Doc. 

enee of potential maintained across the joints, because it would be 
difficult to detect the injury done in a single year, except where the 
soil conditions are favorable to rapid action; but an examination of 
the top of the flanges at insulation joint No. Gin Middlesex Avenue, 
where exposed in the chamber, revealed several distinct pits about 
% of an inch deep on the positive flange ; the negative flange was 
unaffected. This joint is covered with water during a considerable 
portion of the year. 

Since the insulation joints have been set, it has been possible to 
obtain a more accurate measure of the total fall of potential on the 
Boston Elevated tracks and return system than in the past. This 
,f return drop," as it is often called, was found to average as high as 
20 volts during the "average load" periods and 40 volts during 
"peak load" periods, which is much in excess of the 7 volts allowed 
by the government regulations in England, and an even smaller 
limit allowed by the government regulations in France and Ger- 
many. 

Our investigations have shown that the amount of injury to pipes 
from electrolysis in any given district is directly proportional to 
the M return drop ; " and that a very large reduction in the amount 
of electrolytic damage could be made by the railway company, 
by reducing the " return drop " so as to conform to the foreign 
practice. 

The " return drop " on the Boston & Northern and Old Colony 
street railways has not been accurately obtained, but is somewhat 
larger than the " return drop" on the Boston Elevated Railway. 

Several cases of damage to the local water pipes from electrolysis 
have been discovered in Boston, Chelsea, Cambridge and Hyde 
Park during the year, which were due to the bonding of the under- 
ground telephone cable sheaths to the tracks, to protect them from 
electrolysis. These facts have shown us that it is very important to 
obtain the differences of potential between our pipes and the tele- 
phone cables. The location of the fifty or more bonds between the 
telephone cable and the railway returns has already been obtained, 
and arrangements have been made to obtain the differences of poten- 
tial between the cables and our pipes early next year. 

Tests have been made during the year of several insulation coat- 
ings applied to short pieces of pipe, and some of them were of very 
high resistance ; but, on account of the mechanical difficulties to be 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 143 

overcome in applying a perfect coating and preserving it in perfect 
condition in practical use, there appears to be very little chance of 
preventing electrolysis by their use. 

Clinton Sewerage. 

The Clinton sewage disposal works were in daily operation during 
the whole year. The amount of sewage pumped and filtered was 
about 97,000 gallons per day less than during the preceding year. 
This decrease was due largely to the comparatively small amount of 
water which has been allowed to run in the river, and the conse- 
quent decrease in the amount of water entering a leaky section of 
the town sewers located close to the river, between the Lancaster 
Mills and Germantown. A small part of the decrease is due to the 
extension of the metering of house services in Clinton, by which the 
waste of water has been checked. 

Following are statistics relating to the operation of the pumping 
station : — 

Daily average quantity of sewage pumped (gallons), .... .643,000 

Daily average quantity of coal consumed (pounds), .... 1,175 

Gallons pumped per pound of coal, 547 

Number of days pumping, 365 

Cost of pumping : — 

Labor, $1,217 11 

Fuel, 969 63 

Repairs and supplies, . 256 41 

Total for station, $2,443 15 

Cost per million gallons pumped, $10 41 

Cost per million gallons raised 1 foot high, 21 

Filter-beds. 
The 8 settling basins which were put in operation during Novem- 
ber of the previous year have been in continuous operation during 
the present year. During January, February, March and December 
the sewage was turned through a basin which was used continuously 
for two weeks, when the sewage was drawn off and another basin 
used. After March, until July first, the sewage was allowed to run 
through a basin for one week, and was drawn off after standing in 
the basin two days. After July first, until December, the sewage 



Ill METROPOLITAN WATKK [Pub. Doc. 

was allowed to run through a basin for three days, and was almost 
immediately drawn oil' and another basin put in use. 

Considerable sludge has accumulated in the basins, which has 

been removed by the tanners after being allowed to dry out for 

about a week. 

While passing through and standing in the basins rather more 
than .") per cent, of the water is lost by seepage into the ground. 

The use of the basins has not materially improved the character 
of the effluent from the filter-beds. 

During the warmer part of the year the sewage was applied in 
about the same quantity per bed to the 19 beds from which all soil 
had been removed and to the 6 beds from which soil had not been 
removed ; but the latter beds were not used during the colder part 
of the year. From May 4 to November 30 the sewage was applied 
to a bed having an area of 1 acre, for about one and one-half hours, 
the amount per application being about 143,000 gallons, and each 
bed was used about once in six days, which gives an average of 
about 23,000 gallons of sewage per acre per day. 

During the colder portion of the year, when the temperature was 
below 15° above zero, all the sewage of one day's pumping was 
applied to one of 5 improved beds which had been prepared with 
furrows 3 feet 6 inches apart, the average amount per application 
being 523,000 gallons, and each furrowed bed was used about once 
in thirteen days. When the temperature w T as higher than 15° above 
zero, the sewage was applied to improved beds Avhich had not been 
furrowed, for about tw r o and one-half hours, at the rate of about 
336,000 gallons per application, and each bed was used about once 
in eleven days. 

The degree of purification has been about the same as during 
preceding years. The amount of organic matter removed has been 
somewhat greater than for any year since 1901 ; but the nitrification 
has hardly been as good, the nitrates in the effluent being lower 
than in any previous year since the works have been operated. The 
purification during the last half of the year has been markedly better 
than during the first half, as has been usual in other years. 

The results of chemical analyses of the sewage and effluent are 
given in the following table : — 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



145 



[Parts per 100,000.] 





1900. 


1901. 


1902. 


1903. 


1904. 


January to 
June, 1905, 
inclusive. 


July to 
December, 

1905, 
inclusive. 


Whole 
Year, 
1905. 


Albuminoid ammonia, sew 


1.380 


1.0025 


1.0517 


.9233 


.7967 


.8467 


1.4033 


1.1250 


age. 
Albuminoid ammonia, efflu 

ent. 
Per cent, removed, 


.089 
. 94 


.0741 
91 


.0891 
89 


.0782 
92 


.0686 
91 


.0801 
91 


.0772 
94 


.0787 
93 


Oxygen consumed, sewage 


, 14.84 


10.73 


8.85 


8.65 


8.57 


11.72 


14.50 


13.11 


Oxygen consumed, effluent 


1.09 


.82 


1.15 


1.12 


.99 


1.22 


1.02 


1.126 


Per cent, removed, 


93 


91 


84 


87 


88 


90 


93 


91 


Free ammonia, sewage, 


3.9500 


3.4533 


4.3284 


3.8292 


3.97 


3.9600 


5.5467 


4.7533 


Free ammonia, effluent, 


. 1.0631 


.5792 


.6862 


1.0185 


.99 


1.0713 


.8360 


.9588 


Per cent, removed, 


73 


83 


84 


73 


75 


73 


85 


80 


Nitrogen as nitrates, efflu 
ent. 


.7300 


.9298 


.9815 


.4168 


.4046 


.1866 


.3536 


.2665 



The cost of maintaining the filter beds, exclusive of the cost of 
building some board-bottom paved ditches and laying pipe drains 
to drain contiguous land, and of repairs on houses belonging to the 
Board, for which $336.17 has been expended for labor and supplies, 
has been as follows : — 

Labor, $2,475 73 

Repairs and supplies, 77 70 

Total, $2,553 43 

Cost per million gallons filtered, $10 88 



Appended to this report are tables of contracts giving the amount 
of work done and other information, a statement of the cement tests, 
a long series of tables relating to the maintenance of the Metropoli- 
tan Water Works, tables showing the length of main pipes and 
number of service pipes, meters and fire hydrants in the Metropoli- 
tan Water District, and a summary of statistics for 1905. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Boston, January 1, 1906. 



FREDERIC P. STEARNS, 

Chief Engineer. 



1 lh 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



REPORT OF ENGINEER OF SEWERAGE WORKS. 



To the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board. 

Gentlemen : — The following is a report of the operations of the 
Engineering Department of the Metropolitan Sewerage Works for 
the year ending December 31, 1905. 

Organization. 

The engineering organization during the year has been as fol- 
lows : — 



Division Engineers : — 

Frederick D. Smith, 



Frank I. Capen, . 
Frank A. Emery, . 



. In charge of maintenance, South Metropolitan 
System, and construction of High-level Sewer 
in Quincy and Milton. 

. In charge of maintenance and construction, North 
Metropolitan System. 

. In charge of office, drafting room and records. 



In addition to the above, there were employed at the end of the 
year 8 engineering and other assistants. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



147 



METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE DISTRICTS. 

Areas and Populations. 

During the year no changes have been made in the extent of the 
sewerage districts. The area of the North Metropolitan District re- 
mains at 90.50 square miles, and of the South Metropolitan District 
at 100.87 square miles, — a total, inclusive of water surfaces, of 
191.37 square miles. These districts include the whole or parts of 
25 cities and towns, as set forth in the following table. 

The populations in the table are based on the census of 1905. It 
will be noted that the recent census returns do not fully justify all 
the published forecasts of earlier reports. 

Table showing Areas and Estimated Populations within the Metropolitan Sewerage 

District, as of December 31, 1905. 



City or Town. 



Area (Square 
Miles). 



Estimated Popu- 
lation. 



o . 

as 



( Arlington, . 

Belmont, 

Boston (portions of), 

Cambridge, . 

Chelsea, 

Everett, 

Lexington, 1 . 

Maiden, 
{ Medford, 

Melrose, 

Revere, 

Somerville, . 

Stoneham, . 

Wakefield, . 

Winchester, 

Winthrop, . 
^Woburn, 



o 
o u 



•5 

3 

o 
W 



f Boston (portions of), 

Brookline, . 

Dedham, 1 

Hyde Park, . 
■{ Milton, . 

Newton, 

Quincy, 

Waltham, 
'( Watertown, 



Totals, 



5.20 
4.66 
3.45 
6.11 
2.24 
3.34 
5.11 
5.07 
8.35 
3.73 
5.86 
3.96 
5.50 
7.65 
5.95 
1.61 
12.71 



20.39 

6.81 

9.40 

4.57 

12.59 

16.88 

12.56 

13.63 

4.04 



90.50 



100.87 
191.37 



9,820 

4,390' 

93,275 

98,210 

37,700 

29,770 

2,800 

38,610 

19,900 

14,500 

12,950 

70,200 

6,340 

10,410 

8,400 

7,140 

14,430 

144,200 
23,910 

7,400 
14,630 

7,090 
37,240 
28,160 
26,600 
11,420 



478,845 



300,650 
779,495 



1 Part of town. 



148 



METROPOLITAN WATKK 



[Pub. Doe. 



METROPOLITAN SEWERS. 
Sewers Purchased and Constructed and their Connections. 

Within the Sewerage Districts there are now 96.12 miles of Met- 
ropolitan sewers. Of this total, 8.79 miles of sewers, with the 
Quinrv pumping station, have been purchased from cities and towns 
of the districts, the remaining 87 miles of Metropolitan sewers hav- 
ing been constructed by the Metropolitan boards. 

The position, lengths and sizes of these sewers are given in the 
following tables, together with other data referring to the public 
and special connections with the system: — 

North Metropolitan System. 







■ 

9 


0/ c • 


Special Connections. 


City or Town. 


Size of Sewers. 


■5° 


So® 
w -'ZZ 


Character or Location of 


Number 
in 






M 


Publi 
tionf 
ber J 


Connection. 


Opera- 






C 




tion. 






•3 






Boston : — 












Deer Island, . 


6' 3" to 9', . 


1.367 


4 


- 


- 


Bast Boston, . 


9* to 1' 


5.467 


20 


- 


- 


Charlestown, . 


6' 7"X7' 5" to 1, . 


3.292 


>3| 


Navy Yard, .... 
Almshouse, .... 


7 
1 








'! 


Club house, .... 
Fire Dept. Station, . 


1 
1 








r 


Bakery 


1 


Chelsea, 


8'4"X9'2" to 1' 10"X2'4", . 


5.123 




Rendering works, 
Metropolitan Water Works 


1 








{ 


blow-off 


1 


Everett, 


8' 2"X8' 10" to 4'_ 8"X5' 1",. 


2.925 


26 J 


Metropolitan Water Works 

blow-off 

Metropolitan Water Works 


1 


Maiden, 


4' 6"X4' 10" to 1' 3", . 


3.931 1 


blow-off 


1 








Private buildings, 


113 








( 


Private buildings, 


106 


Melrose, 


4'6"X4' 10" to 10", . 


6.099 2 


31 1 


Factory, .... 
Railroad station, 


1 
1 


Cambridge, 


5' 2"X5'9" to 1' 3", 


7.167 


29 | 


Slaughter-house, 
City Hospital, 


1 
1 








f 
10< 


Tannery, .... 


1 


Somerville, 


6'5"X7'2" to 1' 10"X2'3", . 


3.471 


Slaughter-houses (3), 
Car-house, .... 


1 

1 










Armory building, 


1 

1 


Medford, . 


4'8"X5' 1" to 10", 


5.359 


20 
{ 


Private buildings, 

Tannery 

Private buildings, 


5 

1 
2 
2 


Winchester, 


2' 11' x3'3" to 1'3", . 


6.428 


13 \ 
1 


Gelatine factory, 


1 
1 








I 


Railroad station, 


1 


Stoneharn, . 


1' 3" to 10" 


0.010 


4 


- 


- 


Woburn, 


r io"x2' 4" to r 3", . 


0.933 


3 
( 


Glue factory, 
Private buildings, 


1 
90 


Arlington, . 


r 6" to io' , .... 


3.5203 


33 j 


Railroad station, 
Car-house, .... 


1 

3 


Belmont, 4 . 


- 


- 


3 


- 


- 


Wakefield,* 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


Revere, 


4' to 3', .... 


0.048 


2 


- 


- 






58.004* 


232 




351 



1 Includes .988 of a mile of sewer purchased from the city or Maiden. 
- Includes .736 of a mile of sewer purchased from the town of Melrose. 

3 Includes 2.631 miles of sewer purchased from the town of Arlington. 

4 The Metropolitan sewer extends but a few feet into the towns of Belmont and Wakefield. 

" Includes 2.787 miles of Mystic River valley sewer in Medford, Winchester and Woburn, running 
parallel with the Metropolitan sewer. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



149 



South Metropolitan System. 



City or Town. 



Size of Sewers. 



Boston (Back Bay), 

Boston (Brighton), 

Boston (Dorches- 
ter). 
Boston (Roxbury), 

Boston (West Rox- 
bury). 
Brookline, 
Dedham, . 
Hull, 

Hyde Park, 
Milton, . 
Newton, . 
Quincy, . 
Waltham, 
Watertown, 



6' 6" to 5' 6", 

5' 6" to 12", . 
3'X4' to 2' 6"X2' 7", 
6' 6"X7', 4' 0", . 
9' 3"X10' 2" to 12", 



5' 6" 

4'X4'l"to3'9"x3'10", 

60" pipe, 

10*7"Xll'7"to4'X4'l", 

H'Xl2'to8", 

4'2"x4'9"to 1'3", . 

11' 3"X 12' 6" to 24" pipe, 

3'6"X4\ 

4' 2" X4' 9" to 12", 



a> a • 
So 

OH - 

.S m co 

-Pi, 

-2 o » 



1.5001 



3.714 2 
2.8703 
1.430 
7.011 



0.127 
2.350 
0.750 
4.527 
3.600 
2.911 
6.580 
0.001 
0.750 

38.121 



2 
4 

14 



3 
1 
5 

78 



Special Connections. 



Character or Location of 
Connection. 



Number 

in 
Opera- 
tion. 



Private house, 

Administration building, 

Boston Park Department, . 

Simmons College buildings, . 

Abattoir, 

Chocolate works, . 

Paper mill, .... 

Private buildings, . 

Parental school, 

Lutheran Evangelical Church, 

Private buildings, . 



Piivate buildings, 
Private houses, 



Factories, 



2 
2 

2 
22 



1 Includes .355 of a mile of sewer purchased from the city of Boston. 

2 Includes .026 of a mile of sewer purchased from the town of Watertown. 

3 Includes 1.24 miles of sewer purchased from the city of Boston. 

4 Includes .025 of a mile of sewer purchased from the town of Watertown. 



Cost of Construction. 

The cost of the 96 miles of Metropolitan sewers enumerated above, 
including seven stations, siphons and appertaining structures, may 
be summarized as follows : — 



North Metropolitan System, 
South Metropolitan System, 



$6,088,830 56 
7,624,042 66 

$13,712,873 22 



Information relating to areas, populations, local sewer connections 
and other data for the whole Metropolitan Sewerage District appear 



in the following table : 



North Metropolitan District. 



Area 
(Square 


Estimated 

Total 
Population. 


Miles of 

Local Sewer 

connected. 


Estimated 

Population 

contributing 

Sewage. 


Ratio of 

Contributing 

Population 

to Total 
Population 
(PerCent.). 


Connections made 
with Metro- 
politan Sewers. 


Miles). 


Public. 


Special. 


90.50 


478,845 


573.57 


376,575 


78.6 


232 


351 



L50 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



South Metropolitan District. 



Ana 

i, Square 


Estimated 

Total 
Population. 


Mile* of 

Local Bewei 

connected. 


Estimated 

Population 

contribuling 

Sewage. 


Ratio of 

Contributing 

Population 

to Total 
Population 
(PerCent.). 


Connections made 

with Metko- 

poutan Sewers. 


Mllea). 


Public. 


Special. 


100.87 


300,650 439.74 


156,360 


52.0 


78 


22 



Entire Metropolitan District. 



191.37 



779,495 1,013.31 



532,935 



68.4 



310 



373 



Of the estimated gross population of 779,495 on December 31, 
1905, 532,935, representing 68.4 per cent., were on that date con- 
tributing sewage to the Metropolitan sewers, through a total length 
of 1,013.31 miles of local sewers owned by the individual municipali- 
ties. These sewers are connected with the Metropolitan System by 
310 public and 373 special connections. It appears, also, that there 
has been during the year an increase of 48.81 miles of local sewers 
connected with Metropolitan System, and that 12 public and 26 
special connections have been added. 

Pumping Stations and Pumpage. 

The following table shows the average daily volume of sewage lifted 
at each of the six Metropolitan pumping stations during the year, as 
compared with corresponding volumes for the previous year : — 



Pumping Station. 



Average Daily PtnMPAGE. 



Jan. 1, 1904, 

to 
Dec. 31, 1904. 



Jan. 1, 1905, 

to 
Dec. 31, 1905. 



Decrease during 
the Year. 



Deer Island, 

East Boston, 

Charlestown, 

Alewife Brook, 

Quincy, 

Ward Street, . 



Gallons. 
57,200,000 

55,000,000 

31,100,000 

3,546,000 

3,651,000 



Gallons. 
54,400,000 

52,400,000 

29,900,000 

3,234,000 

3,180,000 

20,940,000 



Gallons. 
2,800,000 

2,600,000 

1,200,000 

312,000 

471,000 



Per Cent. 
4.9 

4.7 

3.9 

8.8 

12.9 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOAED. 151 



CONSTRUCTION. 

SOUTH METROPOLITAN SYSTEM. 

During the year all construction carried out by the department 
has been on the South System, by day labor, under the direction of 
the maintenance engineers and foremen. 

This has included grading, loaming slopes and grounds at Nut 
Island and vicinity, and at the Ward Street pumping station ; the 
construction of roads about the Nut Island screen house and the 
Ward Street station ; the placing of a 24-inch force main connecting 
the Quincy pumping station with the High-level Sewer at Greenleaf 
Street, Quincy ; and the reversal of grade of the lower end of the 
Charles River main sewer by a new concrete invert from Bryant 
Street to Vancouver Street. This latter work is now in progress. 

Grading at Nut Island and Vicinity. 

At the beginning of the year the grounds at Nut Island and the 
surface and slopes of embankments connecting Nut Island and Great 
Hill, and over the line of Section 46 from Island Avenue to near 
Prospect Avenue, were in a rough and unfinished condition, as left 
under various earlier contracts, described in previous reports. 

During the year roads have been built over both of the embank- 
ments above noted. The roads were about 20 feet in width, with 
3-inch gravel surfaces rolled. From Nut Island to Great Hill the 
road is protected on both sides of the embankment by wooden fences. 
Roads of similar construction have been built from the screen house 
to the wharf and from the wharf to the beach. There have been 
2,550 linear feet thus constructed at Nut Island and vicinity, involv- 
ing 5,500 square yards of road surfaces. 

During the earlier construction at Nut Island about 4,000 cubic 
yards of loam were stored from the excavation. During the season 
the surfaces of the island have been graded to a rolling condition not 
unlike that found on the island when purchased. These surfaces 
have been covered with from 8 inches to 12 inches of loam. The 
slopes and surfaces of both embankments before referred to have 
been loamed from the road to the riprap line, at about 10 feet above 
average high water of the harbor. Practically all of the stored loam 
has been used in this work. All loamed surfaces have been seeded. 



152 METROPOLITAN WATEB [Pub. Doc. 

Qi [nci Force Main. 

The Quincy pumping station, which was purchased by the Board 
in L901 from the city of Quincy, was al thai date connected by a 
cast-iron pipe with Boston Main Drainage Works at Squantum. 

After the opening of the High-level Sewer, in November, L904, 
arrangements were made for breaking off this connection with the 
city o\' Boston works, and connecting this station with the Metro- 
politan Sewer in Greenleaf Street, in Quincy, by mean- of a new 
24-inch east-iron pipe. The route of this new force main is in a 
general easterly direction from the station through Mcrrvmoiint 
Park, across Furnace Brook Parkway of the Metropolitan System, 
along Park Lane and Valley Street to Greenleaf Street. The total 
length of the new line is 3,025 feet. The pipe as laid has a thick- 
ness of .72 of an inch and a weight of 2,290 pounds for 12-foot 
lengths. 

Through the city park the excavation was largely in loam and 
peat; for a length of 135 feet the pipe is supported on piles 25 feet 
long. The pipe leaves the pumping station at about I feet below 
the engine room floor, at about 8 feet above the level of average low 
tide. An 8-inch pipe branch leads back from this line to the suction 
sewer, providing for quickly draining the main pipe. The pipe 
has a uniformly rising grade without summit, entering the main 
sewer at Greenleaf Street, at 16 feet above the elevation of average 
low water. 

At this point penstock and check valves are introduced for con- 
trolling the sewage flow in the pipe. 

The work of placing the pipe was begun in January and completed 
in August of this year. On August 14 the Quincy sewage was de- 
flected from the Moon Island works, and since that date has been 
delivered to the High-level Sewer. The line was successfully placed 
through the park lands without injury to shrubbery or trees. 

Grading about Ward Street Station. 

At the beginning of the year the grounds about the station were in 

comparatively smooth condition, as left by contractors for the station 

buildings, and partially subgraded by day labor last year. Peat 

found in the excavations had been stored at the easterly end of the 



No. 57.] AND SEWEKAGE BOARD. 153 

lot, and stones and bowlders found had been placed at convenient 
points near the locations of proposed roads. 

All coal at this station is delivered by teams, usually in loads of 
from 8 to 10 tons. It was, therefore, necessary to provide a road 
surface to resist this heavy teaming. During the early portion of 
the year a road about 20 feet in width was constructed, extending 
from Ward Street, near the easterly borders of the lot around the 
station, to the rear of the station buildings, where it is widened to 
about 50 feet, from the screen house to the coal pocket. This pro- 
vides ample street area for maneuvering the coal team. A narrow 
road is thence extended to Vancouver Street near the northwesterly 
corner of the station lot. 

Branch roads also have been constructed back of the engine house 
through the arch at the end of the boiler house, uniting with the main 
road at the coal pocket, and from the barn at the easterly corner of 
the lot to the main road near Ward Street. 

The bowlders and stones found in the early excavations were used 
in the form of Telford paving, about 18 inches in thickness, under 
the road surfaces. This pavement was covered with about 4. inches 
of broken stone and stone dust, and the whole rolled into shape by 
a 20-ton road roller. 

Paths about 8 feet in width, of similar construction to the roads, 
were built to the doors on the Phillips, Ward and Vancouver street 
sides of the engine house. About 2,200 square yards of road sur- 
faces were thus constructed. 

The station lot has an area of 102,000 square feet. The buildings 
and lockers cover 36,000 square feet; the roads and paths cover 
about 20,000 square feet. The remaining area of about 45,000 square 
feet was covered during the early summer, about 1 foot in depth, 
with the most desirable of the peat stored from the excavations. 
This peat was further covered about 4 inches in depth with good 
quality of loam. All of the graded areas have been seeded. The 
bottom of the base course of the engine house buildings is about 2 
feet above the adjacent street levels on Ward and Vancouver streets. 
The finished surface of the lot has been sloped evenly from this base 
course of the buildings to the sidewalk grades of adjacent streets. 



154 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Reversal ov Grade at the Lowes End of the Charles 

River Main Sewer. 

On October 11, 1904, when the Ward Street station was first put 
into operation, bo much of the diaries River Metropolitan main sewer 
as was located above Vancouver Street had been diverted to this new 
pumping station. The length of the Metropolitan sewer below Van- 
couver Street, extending along Huntington Avenue to Gainsborough 
Street, has during the year remained tributary to the Boston Main 
Drainage Works, pending discussion with the city of Boston and 
other public officials, in relation to the disposal of sewage from this 
branch. 

Early in December of this year the works for diverting the sewage 
from this branch to the new Ward Street station were begun. This 
length of sewer in Huntington Avenue varies in diameter from 5 
feet 6 inches to 6 feet 6 inches. The last connection from the local 
sewerage systems with this sewer is located at Bryant Street, distant 
from Vancouver Street about 1,800 feet. The invert of this length 
of 1,800 feet is being regraded from Bryant Street to Vancouver 
Street by introducing a new concrete invert having an inclination 
towards Vancouver Street. 

As the sewage from the districts tributary to this branch is com- 
paratively small, the new invert diameter is reduced to about 3 feet, 
with an inclination towards Vancouver Street of 1 foot in 1,500 feet. 
At Bryant Street it is proposed to introduce a penstock valve, 40 
inches in diameter. This under slight heads will admit of turning the 
whole flow of the existing Charles River main sewer, if desired, into 
its old connection with the Boston Main Drainage Works ; or, under 
like conditions, the city of Boston works may find relief in case of 
accident through the South Metropolitan System. 

At the date of this report, for a length of about 1,100 feet from 
Vancouver to Parker Street, work on the modified invert has been 
largely completed. 

/Section 77, Ward Street Station and Connections. 
At the date of this report the only contract for the construction 
of any part of the High-level Sewer and appurtenances that has not 
been fully completed and adjusted is that for the pumps, boilers and 
connections, at the Ward Street station. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 155 

Under the contract between the E. P. Allis Company of Mil- 
waukee and the Commonwealth, fully described in earlier reports, 
the plant was erected and put into operation as early as October, 
1904. By arrangement between the Board and the engine builders, 
this pumping plant has been operated in the regular service of the 
station during the past year. The engine company have retained 
experts at the station during the year, studying the operation of the 
plant, and from time to time introducing minor modifications found 
essential to satisfy the rigorous tests required under the contract. 
It is probable that the engine company will arrange at an early date 
for completing the trials prescribed in the contract as a condition to 
final payments and adjustment of this contract. 

MAINTENANCE. 

Scope or Work and Force Employed. 

The maintenance of the Metropolitan Sewerage System includes 
the operation of seven stations and 96.12 miles of Metropolitan 
sewers, receiving the discharge from 1,013.31 miles of town and city 
sewers at 310 points, together with the care and study of inverted 
siphons under streams and in the harbor. 

The permanent maintenance force of 118 men includes 68 engi- 
neers and other employes at the pumping stations, and 50 men 
employed on actual sewer maintenance and care of pumping station 
grounds. In the three following tables the use of the completed 
systems and other data are shown : — 



L56 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



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AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



159 



CAPACITY AND RESULTS. 

The following tables summarize the pumping records for the year 
for the Metropolitan Sewerage stations : — 

North Metropolitan System. 

Deer Island Pumping Station. 

At this station are three submerged centrifugal pumps, with im- 
pellers or wheels 8.25 feet in diameter, driven by triple-expansion 
engines of the Reynolds-Corliss type. 

Contract capacity of pumps: 45,000,000 gallons each, with 19-foot lift. 

Average duty for the year: 49,700,000 foot-pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day : 54,400,000 gallons. 

Force employed: 3 engineers, 3 firemen, 6 screenmen and 1 reliefman. 

Coal used : first-quality Cumberland, costing from $3.44 to $3.75 per ton. 



Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the Deer Island Pumping 
Station of the North Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 
(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 

(Gallons). 


Minimum 
Day 

(Gallons). 


Maximum 
Day 

(Gallons). 


Average 

Lift 

(Feet). 


Average 

Duty (ft.-lbs. 

per 100 lbs. 

Coal). 


1905. 

January, . 






2,084,200,000 


67,200,000 


52,900,000 


119,000,000 


10.89 


46,300,000 


February, . 






1,686,400,000 


60,200,000 


51,000,000 


69,300,000 


10.54 


50,100,000 


March, 






2,123,800,000 


68,500,000 


47,800,000 


102,000,000 


10.94 


49,200,000 


April, 






1,915,200,000 


63,800,000 


48,300,000 


104,100,000 


10.82 


52,200,000 


May, . 






1,532,300,000 


49,400,000 


43,800,000 


67,600,000 


10.46 


48,900,000 


June, . 






1,541,300,000 


51,400,000 


36,200,000 


71,000,000 


10.86 


47,600,000 


July, . 






1,437,700,000 


46,400,000 


41,600,000 


53,200,000 


10.30 


51,400,000 


August, 






1,396,100,000 


45,000,000 


37,800,000 


58,700,000 


10.76 


54,900,000 


September, 






1,763,500,000 


58,800,000 


45,400,000 


126,600,000 


10.77 


51,000,000 


October, . 






1,440,200,000 


46,500,000 


39,300,000 


55,400,000 


10.57 


48,700,000 


November, 






1,319,000,000 


44,000,000 


34,100,000 


64,200,000 


10.01 


41,000,000 


December, 






1,585,400,000 


51,100,000 


42,300,000 


65,300,000 


10.63 


44,600,000 


Total, . 


19,825,100,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, 






- 


54,400,000 


43,400,000 


79,700,000 


10.63 


49,700,000 



L60 



MKTKOPOLITAN WATKK 



[Pub. Doc 



East Boston Pumping Station. 
At this station are three submerged centrifugal pumps, with im- 
pellers or wheels 8.25 feel in diameter, driven by triple-expansion 
engines of the Reynolds-Corliss type. 



Contract capacity of pumps: 15,000,000 gallons each, with l!»-foot lift. 
Average duty foi the year: 66,800,000 toot-pounds. 
Average quantity raised eaoh day: 52,400,000 gallons. 

Force employed : 8 engineers, 3 firemen, 6 screenmon and 1 relief num. 
Coal used : first-quality Cumberland, costing from $3.30 to $3.60 p er ton. 

Table oj Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the East Boston Pumping 
Station of the North Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 
(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 

(Gallons). 


Minimum 

D.iy 
(Gallons). 


Maximum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Average 

Lift 
(Feet). 


Average 

Duty (ft -lbs. 

per 100 lbs. 

Coal). 


1903 

January, . 




2,022,200,000 


65,200,000 


50,900,000 


117,000,000 


16.71 


56,500,000 


February, . 






1,630,400,000 


58,200,000 


49,000,000 


67,300,000 


16.56 


53,000,000 


March, 






2,061,800,000 


66,500,000 


45,800,000 


100,000,000 


16.48 


58,700,000 


April, 






1,855,200,000 


61,800,000 


46,300,000 


102,100,000 


16.58 


52,700,000 


May, . 






1,470,300,000 


47,400,000 


41,800,000 


65,600,000 


16.07 


55,000,000 


Juue, .' . 






1,481,300,000 


49,400,000 


34,200,000 


69,000,000 


16.02 


59,300,000 


July, . 






1,375,700,000 


44,400,000 


39,600,000 


51,200,000 


16.06 


58,300,000 


August, 






1,334,100,000 


43,000,000 


35,800,000 


56,700,000 


16.02 


58,100,000 


September, 






1,703,500,000 


56,800,000 


43,400,000 


124,600,000 


16.19 


58,000,000 


October, 






1,378,200,000 


44,500,000 


37,300,000 


53,400,000 


16.00 


54,900,000 


November, 






1,259,000,000 


42,000,000 


32,100,000 


62,200,000 


16.01 


51,500,000 


December, 






1,523,400,000 


49,100,000 


40,300,000 


63,300,000 


16.01 


53,900,000 


Total, . 


19,095,100,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, 






- 


52,400,000 


41,400,000 


77,700,000 


16.23 


55,800,000 



No. 57.] 



AND SE WEE AGE BOAED. 



161 



Charlestown Pumping Station. 
At this station are three submerged centrifugal pumps, two of 
them having impellers or wheels 7.5 feet in diameter, the other 
8.25 feet in diameter. They are driven by triple-expansion engines 
of the Eeynolds-Corliss type. 

Contract capacity of pumps: two, 22,000,000 gallons each, with 11-foot lift; one, 60,000,000 

gallons, with 8-foot lift. 
Average duty for the year: 43,100,000 foot-pounds. 
Average quantity raised each day: 29,900,000 gallons. 
Force employed: 3 engineers, 3 firemen, 6 screenmen and 1 reliefman. 
Coal used: first quality Cumberland, costing from $3.45 to $3.60 per ton. 



Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the Charlestown Pumping 
Station of the North Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 
(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 

(Gallons). 


Minimum 
Day 

(Gallons). 


Maximum 
Day 

(Gallons). 


Average 

Lift 
(Feet). 


Average 

Duty (ft. -lbs. 

per 100 lbs. 

Coal). 


1905. 

January, . 






1,063,900,000 


34,300,000 


27,900,000 


66,700,000 


8.11 


46,100,000 


February, . 






889,400,000 


31,800,000 


27,100,000 


37,100,000 


7.93 


43,000,000 


March, 






1,085,700,000 


35,000,000 


26,500,000 


49,600,000 


8.17 


48,500,000 


April, 






931,700,000 


31,100,000 


22,600,000 


48,200,000 


7.92 


44,100,000 


May, . 






882,900,000 


28,500,000 


22,800,000 


54,000,000 


7.74 


42,000,000 


June, . 






922,200,000 


30,700,000 


21,000,000 


43,100,000 


7.93 


44,300,000 


July, . 






876,100,000 


28,300,000 


23,000,000 


32,200,000 


7.80 


44,800,000 


August, 






838,200,000 


27,000,000 


22,800,000 


41,200,000 


7.63 


41,800,000 


September, 






913,900,000 


30,500,000 


23,600,000 


61,600,000 


7.88 


47,000,000 


October, . 






878,000,000 


28,300,000 


21,800,000 


40,000,000 


7.78 


43,900,000 


November, 






754,300,000 


25,100,000 


20,500,000 


40,000,000 


7.62 


34,800,000 


December, 






863,000,000 


27,800,000 


22,100,000 


39,800,000 


7.63 


37,400,000 


Total, . 


10,899,300,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, 






- 


29,900,000 


23,500,000 


46,100,000 


7.85 


43,100,000 



162 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Alewifi Brook Pumping Station, 
The plant at this station consists <>f tho original installation of 
small commercial pumps and engines, i.e., two 9-inch Andrews 
vertical centrifugal pumps, with direct-connected compound marine 
engines, together with the recent additions. The latter consists of a 
specially designed engine of the vertical cross-compound type, hav- 
ing between the cylinders a centrifugal pump rotating on a hori- 

ill o 

zontal axis. 

Contract capacity <>f the two original pumps: 4,600,000 gallons each, with 13-foot lift. 

Contract capacity of new pump: 13,000,000 gallons, with 13-foot lift. 

Average duty for the year: 17,000,000 foot-pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day: 3,234,000 gallons. 

Force employed : 3 engineers. 

Coal used: first quality Cumberland, costing from 33.60 to $4.65 per ton. 



Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the Alewife Brook Pumping 
Station of the North Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 
(Gallons). 


Average 

per Day 

(GallotiH). 


Minimum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Maximum 
Day 

(Gallons). 


Average 

Lift 
(Feet). 


Average 

Duty (ft. -lbs. 

per 100 lbs. 

Coal). 


1905. 

January, . 




140,596,000 


4,635,000 


2,786,000 


7,993,000 


13.17 


20,200,000 


February, . 




105,312,000 


3,761,000 


3,179,000 


4,201,000 


13.35 


. 18,800,000 


March, 




151,633,000 


4,891,000 


3,279,000 


7,462,000 


13.09 


22,400,000 


April, 




119,141,000 


3,971,000 


2,692,000 


7,049,000 


13.25 


20,400,000 


May, . 




88,640,000 


2,859,000 


2,288,000 


3,862,000 


13.25 


16,100,000 


June, . 




87,863,000 


2,929,000 


2,330,000 


4,260,000 


13.25 


16,200,000 


July, . 




74,095,000 


2,390,000 


2,036,000 


3,379,000 


13.32 


15,000,000 


August, 




67,907,000 


2,191,000 


1,826,000 


3,179,000 


13.18 


14,300,000 


September, 




106,990,000 


3,566,000 


2,120,000 


7,226,000 


13.06 


18,100,000 


October, . 




76,619,000 


2,472,000 


1,994,000 


3,862,000 


13.24 


14,700,000 


November, 




69,166,000 


2,306,000 


1,784,000 


4,435,000 


13.20 


14,000,000 


December, 




90,934,000 


2,933,000 


2,372,000 


4,615,000 


12.21 


14,300,000 


Total, . 


1,178,896,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, . 




- 


3,234,000 


2,391,000 


5,127,000 


13.13 


17,000,000 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOAED. 



163 



Ward Street Pumping Station. 

At this station are two vertical, triple-expansion pumping en- 
gines, of the Allis-Chalmers type, operating reciprocating^ pumps, 
the plungers of which are 48 inches in diameter with a 60-inch 
stroke. 

Contract capacity of pumps: 50,000,000 gallons each, with 45-foot lift. 

Average duty for the year: 89,700,000 foot-pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day: 20,940,000 gallons. 

Force employed : 3 engineers, 3 firemen, 3 oilers, 3 screenmen and 1 reliefman. 

Coal used: first quality Cumberland, costing from $4.10 to $4.28 per ton. 



Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the Ward Street Pumping 
Station of the South Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 

(Gallons). 


Average 

per Day 

(Gallons). 


Minimum 
Day 

(Gallons). 


Maximum 
Day 

(Gallons). 


Average 

Lift 
(Feet) . 


Average 

Duty (ft.-lbs. 

per 100 lbs. 

Coal). 


1905 

January, . 






841,600,000 


27,200,000 


20,340,000 


34,260,000 


39.70 


74,900,000 


February, . 






598,800,000 


21,400,000 


18,040,000 


22,950,000 


39.40 


69,000,000 


March, 






779,800,000 


25,200,000 


17,710,000 


34,700,000 


41.00 


102,100,000 


April, 






724,000,000 


24,100,000 


17,770,000 


36,170,000 


41. eo 


114,200,000 


May, . 






612,100,000 


19,700,000 


16,730,000 


24,070,000 


41.20 


86,600,000 


June, . 






589,000,000 


19,600,000 


15,170,000 


21,360,000 


40.30 


89,800,000 


July, . 






514,200,000 


16,590,000 


12,840,000 


21,470,000 


40.00 


73,200,000 


August, 






481,800,000 


15,540,000 


12,140,000 


21,560,000 


39.37 


69,800,000 


September, 






708,100,000 


23,600,000 


17,670,000 


55,250,000 


40.02 


91,300,000 


October, . 






559,200,000 


18,000,000 


14,720,000 


25,950,000 


40.14 


85,500,000 


November, 






548,100,000 


18,300,000 


15,650,000 


24,040,000 


40.10 


108,500,000 


December, 






685,100,000 


22,100,000 


16,500,000 


32,200,000 


40.34 


111,000,000 


Total, . 


7,641,800,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, 






- 


20,940,000 


16,270,000 


29,500,000 


40.26 


89,700,000 



Records from plunger displacement. 
Average slip for the year about 11 per cent. 



164 



METROPOLITAN WATEB 



[Pub. Doc. 



Quincy Pumping Station* 
At this station are two compound condensing Deane pumping 
engines. 

Contract oapaoity oi pumps: one, 8,000,000 gallons, the other, 5,000,000 gallons, with 36- 

foot lift. 
Average duty for the year: 32,800,000 toot-pounds. 
Average quantity raised eaota day: 3,180,000 gallons. 
Poroe employed : 3 engineers and l Boreenman. 
Coal used : first-quality Cumberland, costing from $4.20 to $4.75 per ton. 



Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the Quincy Pumping Station 

of the South Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 
(Gallons). 


Average 

per Day 

(Gallons). 


Minimum 
Day 

(Gallons). 


Maximum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Average 

Lift 
(Feet) . 


Average 

Duty (ft -lbs. 

per 100 His. 

Coal). 


1905. 

January, . 




108,877,000 


3,512,000 


2,881,000 


4,973,000 


35.60 


34,600,000 


February, . 






87,534,000 


3,126,000 


2,969,000 


3,315,000 


36.74 


31,600,000 


March, 






110,443,000 


3,563,000 


3,011,000 


4,132,000 


38.29 


38,000,000 


April, 






1-20,031,000 


4,001,000 


3,387,000 


5,059,000 


38.22 


40,700,000 


May, . 






101,670,000 


3,280,000 


2,834,000 


3,565,000 


38.83 


27,200,000 


June, . 






90,273,000 


3,009,000 


2,825,000 


3,281,000 


39.62 


37,900,000 


July, . 






84,559,000 


2,728,000 


2,491,000 


2,940,000 


38.38 


35,300,000 


August, 






82,913,000 


2,675,000 


2,458,000 


2,998,000 


33.18 


32,400,000 


September, 






97,222,000 


3,241,000 


2,620,000 


3.891,000 


22.04 


31,300,000 


October, . 






92,323,000 


2,978,000 


2,778,000 


3,190,000 


22.00 


30,600,000 


November, 






86,213,000 


2,874,000 


2,708,000 


3,165,000 


21.80 


26,000,000 


December, 






98,444,000 


3,176,000 


2,934,000 


3,315,000 


21.42 


28,200,000 


Total, . 


1,160,502,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, 






- 


3,180,000 


2,825,000 


3,652,000 


32.18 


32,800,000 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWEKAGE BOARD. 



165 



Nut Island Screen House, 

The plant at the house includes two sets of screens in duplicate, 
actuated by small reversing engines of the Fitchburg type. Two ver- 
tical Deane boilers, 80 horse-power each, operate the engines, pro- 
vide heat for the house and burn materials intercepted at the screens. 

Average quantity of sewage passing screens daily, 25,000,000 gallons. 

Total materials intercepted at screens during the past year, 543 cubic yards. 

Materials intercepted per million gallons of sewage discharge, 1.6 cubic feet. 

Force employed : 3 engineers and 3 screenmen. 

Coal used: 281 tons first quality Cumberland, costing from $3.59 to $6.35 per ton. 

In the following tables the total cost of pumping and the rate 
per million foot-gallons at each of six pumping stations are shown 
in detail : — 

Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the Deer Island Station. 

Volume (19,825 Million Gallons) x Lift (10.63 Feet) = 210,741 Million Foot gallons. 



Items. 



Cost. 



Cost 

per Million 

Foot gallons. 



Labor 

Coal, 

Oil, . - 

Waste 

Water 

Packing 

Miscellaneous supplies and renewals, 
Totals 



£9,228 20 

6,035 26 

196 08 

76 57 

1,018 80 

343 28 

1,475 28 



$18,373 47 



$0.04379 
.02864 
.00093 
.00036 
.00483 
.00163 
.00700 

$0.08718 



Average Cost per Million Foot- gallons for Pumping at the East Boston Station. 

Volume (19,095 Million Gallons) X Lift (16.23) =309,913 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 



Cost. 



Cost 

per Million 

Foot-gallons. 



Labor 

Coal 

Oil 

Waste 

Water 

Packing, 

Miscellaneous supplies and renewals, 
Totals, . . 



$8,689 89 

7,455 52 

256 69 

61 43 

1,056 60 

48 56 

948 33 

$18,517 02 



$0.02803 
.02406 
.00083 
.00019 
.00341 
.00016 
.00306 

$0.05974 



166 



MKTUOPOLITAN WATEB 



[Pub. Doc. 



Avtragt Oott pet Million Foot-gallons for Pumping oU the Charlestotm Station. 

Volume (10,8M Million Gallons) X Lift (7 .85 Feet) = 85,659 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 



Coat. 



COHt 

per Million 
Foot-gallons. 



Labor, 
Ooal, 

Oil, 

Waste, 

Water, 

Packing, 

Miscellaneous supplies and renewals, 
Totals 



|8,609 si 

2,768 54 
169 90 
71 02 
405 60 
180 05 
961 29 
$13,166 21 



$0.10051 
.03235 
.00199 
.00083 
.00474 
.00210 
.01124 



$0.15376 



Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the Alewife Brook Station. 

Volume (1,178.896 Million Gallons) X Lift (13.13 Feet) = 15,479 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 



Cost. 



Cost 

per Million 

Foot-gallons. 



Labor, 

Coal 

Oil 

Waste 

Water, 

Packing, 

Miscellaneous supplies and renewals, 
Totals 



$3,296 89 

1,521 16 

68 68 

38 22 

150 48 

41 56 

138 16 



$5,255 15 



$0.21299 
.09827 

. .00444 
.00247 
.00972 
.00270 
.00893 



$0.33952 



Average Cost per Million Foot- gallons for Pumping at the Ward Street Station. 

Volume (7,642 Million Gallons) X Lift (40.26 Feet) =307,659 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 



Cost. 


Cost 

per Million 

Foot-gallons. 


$10,946 61 


$0.03558 


7,052 50 


.02292 


632 27 


.00206 


88 83 


.00029 


1,117 20 


.00363 


287 24 


.00093 


267 82 


.00087 


$20,392 47 


$0.06628 



Labor, 

Coal 

Oil, 

Waste 

Water, 

Packing, 

Miscellaneous supplies and renewals, 
Totals, 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



167 



Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the Quincy Station. 

Volume (1,160 Million Gallons) X Lift (32.18 Feet) = 37,345 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 



Cost. 



Cost 

per Million 

Foot-gallons. 



Labor, 

Coal 

Oil 

Waste, 

Water, 

Packing, 

Miscellaneous supplies and renewals, 
Totals, 



53,581 19 

1,943 14 

30 22 

11 41 

178 42 

40 03 

581 98 



$6,366 39 



$0.09590 
.05203 
.00081 
.00031 
.00478 
.00107 
.01558 



.17048 



Care of Special Structures. 

During the year the sea has encroached on the right of way for 
the outfall sewer at the southerly end of Deer Island, exposing the 
sheathing used for the original trench excavation. It has been 
found necessary to defend this section of the sewer by placing heavy 
riprap slopes on the easterly side of the embankment from the man- 
hole near the high-water line for a distance of about 200 feet north- 
erly. This work has involved the placing of 350 tons of stone. 

Overflow at Malden. 

During the years 1900 and 1901 a Metropolitan main sewer was 
constructed in the valleys of Spot Pond and Ell Pond brooks, from 
Wakefield through Melrose and Maiden to near Barrett's Pond. At 
this point it was connected with the original Metropolitan sewer. 

This construction was adequate until last spring, when the Metro- 
politan sewer below Barrett's Pond became surcharged, and acted as 
a pipe under pressure. 

The new sewer should be extended to the tidal reaches of the 
Maiden River below Charles Street, where an ample overflow from 
the sewer to the river should be provided from this branch of the 
Metropolitan sewer, until such time as the works are more compre- 
hensively relieved. 

Material intercepted at the Screens. 
The material intercepted at the screens at the North Metropolitan 
sewerage stations, consisting of rags, paper and other floating mat- 



168 WATER AM) SEWERAGE BOARD. [P. I). No. 57. 

tors, has during the year amounted to 2,018 cubic yards. This is 
equivalent to 2.7 cubic feel for each million gallons of sewage pumped 
at Deer Island. 

South Metropolitan Outfalls. 

The 60-inch outlet pipes in the harbor have been in operation 
fourteen months at the date of this report. During the past year the 
average How through them has been 25,000.000 gallons of sewage 
per day, with a maximum of 78,000,000 gallons during heavy storm. 

The diving contractor who placed these pipes in the harbor has 
recently examined the outlets, and found no deposits on the bed of 
the harbor in the vicinity of the outlets either of sand or any ma- 
terials from the sewage discharge. He penetrated the pipes for a 
length of 50 feet, and found them clean and in normal condition. A 
recent examination of the shores of the harbor and islands in the 
vicinity of the outfalls foils to disclose any trace of deposit attribu- 
table to this sewage discharge. 

Additional Pumps at Quincy Station. 
An examination of the yearly records at this station indicates that 
the average sewage flow during dry w r eather equals and for much of 
the time exceeds the capacity of the smaller of the two pumps, and the 
sewage flow during very wet conditions exceeds the capacity of the 
larger pump. Additional pumping plant at this station should be 
introduced during the coming season. 

Material intercepted at the Screens, South Metropolitan 

System. 

The material intercepted at the screens at the stations of this 
system has amounted to 1,986 cubic yards, equal to 5.9 cubic feet 
per million gallons of sewage delivered at the outfall works at Xut 
Island. 

Studies of sew 7 age flows in the Metropolitan sewers, siphons and 
outfall pipes indicate they are satisfactorily free from deposit, and in 
normal condition. 

Kespectfully submitted, 

WM. M. BROWN, 

Engineer Sewerage Works. 
Boston, January 1, 1906. 



APPENDIX. 



170 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Appendix No. 1. 



Contracts made and pending during 

Contracts relating to the Dam 

[Note. —The details of contracta made before 





1. 

Num- 
ber 
of Con- 
tract. 


2. 

WORK. 


3. 

Num- 
ber of 
Bids. 


Amount 


of Bid. 


6. 




4. 

Next to Low- 
est. 


5. 

Lowest. 


Contractor. 


1 


195 


Wachusett Dam, 


11 


$1,680,870 00 


$1,603,635 001 


McArthur Brothers 
Company. 


2 


245 


Section 2 of relocation of 
Central Massachusetts 
Railroad (extension of 
Contract No. 195). 


_2 




_2 


McArthur Brothers 
Company. 


3 


257» 


Excavating soil, . 


6 


449,300 00 


414,987 50i 


Bruno, 8alomone & 
Petitti. 


4 


2823 


Building a part of Newton 
Street and improving 
Crescent Street, West 
Boylston, Mass. 


8 


4,508 75 


4,496 431 


Newell & Snowling Con- 
struction Co., Ox- 
bridge, Mass. (by 
assignment from Mc- 
Bride &Co.). 


5 


2833 


Stillwater River Improve- 
ment, West Boylston 
and Sterling, Mass. 


8 


25,500 00 


25,461 25i 


McBride & Co., 
Brighton, Mass. 


6 


284 3 


Riprap at South Dike, 
Boylston, Mass. 


_2 


_-j 


_2 


McArthur Brothers Co., 
Chicago, 111. 


7 


2853 


Surfacing highways with 
broken stone (8ectiou 1), 
West Boylston, Mass. 


6 


7,254 09 


7,211 92' 


The H. Gore Co ., 
Boston, Mass. 


8 


2863 


Surfacing highways with 
broken stone (Section 2), 
West Boylston and Boyl- 
ston, Mass 


5 


9,563 70 


9,360 95i 


The H. Gore Co., 
Boston, Mass. 


& 


289 


Brass railing posts, Wa- 
chusett Dam, Clinton, 
Mass. 


4 


5,780 00 


4,150 001 


J. H. McCafferty & Co., 
Boston, Mass. 


10 


2903 


Brass tubing for railing, 
Wachusett Dam, Clin- 
ton, Mass. 


4 


2,165 45 


2,165 45i 


American Tube Works, 
Boston, Mass. 


11 


291 


Granite posts, curbing and 
edgestones for Wachu- 
sett Dam. 


6 


1,741 00 


1,700 001 


F. A. McCauliff, Fitch- 
burg, Mass. 



1 Contract based upon this bid. 



2 Competitive bids were not received on this contract. 



No. 57.] 



AND SE WEE AGE BOARD. 



171 



Appendix No. 1. 



the Year 1905 — Water Works. 

and Reservoir Department. 

1905 have been given in previous reports.] 



7. 


8. 


9. 


10. 




Date 

of Contract. 


Date of 

Completion of 

Work. 


Prices of Principal Items of 
Contracts made in 1905. 


Value of Work 
done Decem- 
ber 31, 1905. 




Oct, 1, '00, 


- 


- 


$1,569,790 00 


1 


April 18, '02, 


- 


- 


282,390 00 


2 


Dec. 27, '02, 


Nov. 11, '05, 


- 


543,680 45 


3 


April 21, '05, 


July 6, '05, 


For earth excavation, $0.18% per cubic yard, . 


4,812 25 


4 


May 15, '05, 


Nov. 11, '05, 


For clearing and grubbing, $53 per acre; for earth 
excavation, $0.19% per cubic yard. 


28,181 69 


5 


May 4, '05, 


Nov. 21, '05, 


For riprap, $125 per cubic yard, .... 


15,385 24 


6 


May 23, '05, 


Nov. 9, '05, . 


For shaping roadbed, $0,045 per linear foot; for 
broken stone in place, $1.73 per ton. 


7,856 09 


7 


May 23, '05, 


Nov. 4, '05, 


For shaping road-bed, $0,045 per linear foot; for 
broken stone in place, $1.73 per ton. 


9,790 48 


8 


Sept. 8, '05, 


- 




1,700 00 


9 


Sept. 7, '05, 


Nov. 3, '05, 


- 


2,192 06 


10 


Dec. 12, '05, 


- 




- 


11 








$2,465,778 26 





3 Contract completed. 



172 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Contracts made and pending during the 

Contracts relating to the 





1. 

Num- 
ber 
of Con- 
tract. 


WORK. 


3. 

Num- 
ber of 
Bids. 


Amount 


of Bid. 


6. 




4. 

Next to Low- 
est. 


5. 

Lowest. 


Contractor. 


1 


2873 


Cast-iron -water pipes and 
special castings. 


3 


$2,017 74 


$1,991 80 1 


Warren Foundry and 
Machine Co., New 
York, N. Y. 


2 


288 


Pumping engine for the 
Arlington station. 


7 


7,900 00 


7,830 00 


AllisCh al me r s Co., 
Milwaukee, Wis. 


3 


2923 


41.5 tons special castings, . 


4 


69 00 
per ton. 


57 50 1 
per ton. 


R. D. Wood & Co., 
Philadelphia, Pa. 


4 


Special 
Order. 3 


2 36-inch special foot 
valves. 


_2 


_2 


_2 


Coffin Valve Co., Bos- 
ton. 


5 


Special 
Order. 3 


Repairs on Upharn house 
in Weston . 


3 


$1,325 00 


$874 00i 


H. L. Cooper, Weston, 
Mass. 


6 


Special 
Order.s 


36-inch valve, 


_2 


_2 


_2 


Chapman Valve Mfg. 
Co., Indian Orchard, 
Mass. 


7 


Special 
Order. 3 


Changing 36-inch gate 
from geared to hydrau- 
lic. 




_ o 


_2 


Coffin Valve Co., Boa- 
ton. 



1 Contract based upon this bid. 



2 Competitive bids were not received on this contract. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



173 



Year 1905 — Water Works — Continued. 
Distribution Department. 



7. 

Date 
of Contract. 



H. 

Date of 

Completion of 

Work. 



0. 



Prices of Principal Items of 
Contracts made in 19u5. 



10. 

Value of "Work 
done Decem- 
ber 31, 1905. 



April 28, '05, 

Oct. 28, '05, 
Mar. 6, '05, 
Mar. 6, '05, 
Mar. 29, '65, 
May 8, '05, 

June 14, '05, 



July 18, '05, 

Dec. 30, '05, 
July 21, '05, 
June 16, '05, 
Sept. 20, '05, 

Nov. 20, '05, 



For 48-inch cast iron pipe, $26 per ton of 2,000 
pounds; for special castings, $O.U23 per pound. 



For whole work, $9,790, 

For all castings, $57.50 per ton of 2,000 pounds, 

For each valve, $493, 

For whole work, $874 

For one 36-inch hydraulic valve, $751.51, . 



For whole work, $687, 



$2,122 33 

2,279 27 
986 00 
914 07 
751 51 

687 00 

$7,740 18 



3 Contract completed. 



171 



METROPOLITAN WATEB 



[Pub. Doc. 



CONTRAOTfl M.uti: and PENDING DURING Tin: Yeak 1905 

( included. 
Simmiary of Contracts. 1 



Watkij Wokks 



Value of Work 
done Decem- 
ber 31, 1905. 



Wachusett Reservoir, 6 contracts, 

Relocation of Central Massachusetts Railroad, 1 contract, . 

Wachusett Dam, 4 contracts, 

Distribution Department, 3 contracts, 

Total of 14 contracts made and pending during the year 1905, 
273 contracts completed from 1896 to 1904, inclusive, . 



Deduct for work done on 11 Sudbury Reservoir contracts by the city of Boston, 
Total of 293 contracts 



$609,706 20 

282,390 00 

1,573,682 06 

4,401 60 



$2,470,179 86 
13,100,481 31 



$15,570,681 17 
512,000 00 



$15,058,661 17 



1 In this summary, contracts charged to maintenance are excluded. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 175 



Appendix No. 2. 



Cement Tests — Water Works. „ 

The following tables contain : — 

1. Tests of cements used in the construction of the Wachusett Dam and 
other works at the Wachusett Reservoir during the years 1901 to 1905, 
inclusive. 

2. Tests of cements used in the construction of the Weston Aqueduct 
during the years 1901 to 1903, inclusive. 

The methods of testing were the same as described in Appendix No. 3 
of the annual report of the year 1897. 



176 



MKTROPOL1TAX WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



8ummary of Tests of Cement used in the Construction of the Wachusett Dam 





BRAND. 


ffUXBBB or 
Barrels 

I SKI). 


•t 
a 

IV 

3 

E 

o 


FINENESS. 


Wire 

Tests. 


Tensile 
Strength. 








a © aj 
SofS 

2 <u32 


• a? 9 


1-2 x 


oj 
IS 


c 

a 
0) >> 


ONE 


DAT. 




X 


J3 










a 


91 0) O 


o oj w 


»iJ 2 


02 £ 




u 










o 


«35~ 


J Sh 


^-^ 


25 

00 
OJ 

3 

a 


o ^ 




- 8 






S 

OS 
P 

•a 


es 
—> 
o 


o 

D. 

a 
o 


X 

O o aj « 


So 8J 

© 3 
.3 ©" 3< 


2 6 » 

-T 3 

5 oeoCO 


X 
V 

«-> 
3 
3 


if 

is 

3 


<— aj 
"3 S 
3 ^ 






< 


H 


O 


Ph 


b 


b 


5 


a 


fc 


£ 




Portland cement : — 






















1 


Alpha, . 


150 


491 


j Neat, . 
|2tol, . 


.4 


10.9 


28.6 


158 


347 
316 


47 


694 


2 


Alsen, . 


225 


355 


j Neat, . 
j 2tol, . 


.4 


11.2 


26.4 


116 


291 
306 


31 


625 


3 


Alias, . 


3,064 


3,763 


i Neat, . 
I 2tol, . 


.2 


9.0 


22.4 


113 


354 

287 


207 


571 


4 


Catekill, 


- 


305 


1 Neat, . 
| 2tol,. 


.4 


7.0 


22.3 


130 


300 
298 


10 


476 


5 


Giant, . 


65,809 


70,704 


1 Neat, . 
I 2tol, . 


.5 


8.7 


21.9 


140 


380 
383 


4,088 


586 


6 


Helderberg, . 


200 


212 


1 Neat, . 
} 2tol, . 


.2 


5.0 


19.9 


173 


480 
450 


23 


383 


7 


Iron Clad, . 


4,260 


4,540 


( Neat, . 
|2tol, . 


.1 


4.2 


17.1 


86 


304 
293 


222 


652 


8 


Lehigh, . 


7,245 


14,075 


( Neat, . 
/ 2tol, . 


.1 


8.2 


22.0 


217 


484 

481 


975 


528 


9 


Star, 


- 


1,200 


1 Neat, . 
) 2tol, . 


.5 


9.8 


24.4 


154 


336 
356 


51 


691 


10 


8tettin-Giretow, . 


- 


2,200 


\ Neat, . 
J2tol, . 


.7 


8,3 


21.3 


62 


178 
351 


252 


377 


11 


Whitehall, . 
Total, 


150 


150 


( Neat, . 
( 2tol, . 


.3 


8.3 


27.5 


180 
144 


360 
450 

381 
384 


20 


736 




81,103 


97,995 


J Neat, . 
J2tol, . 


.4 


8.4 


21.8 


5,926 


571 




Natural cement : — 






























( Neat, . 


.9 


6.2 


18.fi 


65 


131 


7,070 


173 


12 


Union, . 


182,480 


182,480 


Jltol,. 


- 


- 


- 


56 


110 


- 


- 










(2tol,. 


™ 


— 


~ 


— 


— 


- 


- 



Summary of Tests of Cement used in the Construction 



13 

14 
15 
16 


Portland cement: — 
Atlas, . 

Giant, . 

Saylor's, 

Lehigh, 

Total, 

Natural cement : — 
Hoffman, 

Union, . 
Total, 


- 


91,875 
7,653 
2,200 
5,160 


( Neat, . 
) 2tol, . 
1 Neat, . 
) 2tol, . 
1 Neat, . 
/ 2 to 1, . 
| Neat, . 
| 2tol,. 

\ Neat, . 
>2tol,. 

\ Neat, . 

Mtol,. 

Neat, . 

jltol,. 

j Neat, . 

h to i, . 


.2 
.3 
.2 
.1 


9.4 
9.5 
6.2 
9.7 


20.0 
20.7 
18.0 
20.8 


58 

69 

161 

134 

65 

27 
26 
40 

27 

29 
26 


331 
417 
303 
366 
479 
544 
344 
515 


4,356 
430 
127 
207 


423 
420 
214 
374 


17 
18 


- 


106,888 

98,347 
14,738 


.2 

1.1 

1.0 


9.4 

6.8 
6.8 


20.0 

*. 
13.1 


333 
420 

61 
63 
90 
73 

65 
64 


5,120 

4,485 
832 


415 

138 
157 




113,085 


1.1 


6.8 


5,317 


141 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



177 



and Other Works at the Waehusett Reservoir, 1901 to 1905, Inclusive. 



Tensile Strength — Concluded. 




SEVEN 
DAYS. 


TWENTY- 
EIGHT DATS. 


THREE 
MONTHS. 


SIX 
MONTHS. 


NINE 
MONTHS. 


ONE 

YEAR. 


EIGHTEEN 
MONTHS. 


TWO 
YEARS. 


THREE 
YEARS. 




a 

x> u 

gcq 

p 

to 


XI 
V 

u a 
a>M 

*0 5 
s °^ 

cm 


CO 

•° h 

s 
to 




u a 
P<g> 

C & 

§ o< 
Cm 


0> 

0>.l= 

X> >- 

s« 




u - 

® i3 

-a « 

a 5i 
§QQ 
Cm 


to 

oi 

a> .a 

gM 

P 



u a 
a> 1— -t 

P. 

°* 
CM 


oi 
at 

of 

'" CT 1 
V -P 
X> ** 

g« 

a 
25 


J2 



j- a 
a>i— ( 

P. a) 
P^ 

Ph 


CD 
CP.S 

x> *» 

gtt 

p 


-p 


■~ a 

C» »— I 

P-ijj 

p °^ 
Cm 


m 

og 

s« 

p 


A 
o 

^ a 

0) 1— 1 

Pi <u 

°l 

goo 
Cm 


<v 

.O s- 

gcq 

p 


x] 


"DM 

P<a> 

p °^ 

Cm 


09 
O 

of 

z? 

.0 ~ 

gcq 

p 

to 




u a 
a> 1 — 1 

Pi g; 

03 ** 

•§§ 

p & 
cm 




47 

47 

32 

32 

206 

207 

10 

10 

4,029 

4,094 

23 

23 

218 

218 

974 

974 

51 

51 

251 

250 

20 

20 


1,021 
474 
776 
373 
837 
384 
855 
393 
849 
400 
843 
301 
700 
403 
868 
395 
927 
433 
475 
281 
946 
434 


5 

5 

15 

15 

167 

167 

10 

10 

3,811 

3,816 

23 

23 

221 

222 

621 

621 

28 

28 

251 

252 

13 

13 


1,026 
428 
753 
433 
848 
450 
903 
477 
873 
451 
933 
409 
712 
451 
877 
498 
924 
428 
538 
378 
970 
478 


5 
5 
5 
5 
20 
20 

381 

405 

5 

5 

25 

25 

70 

70 

15 

15 

5 

5 

531 
555 

430 
425 
355 


1,029 
445 
761 
413 
801 
444 

819 
462 
906 
377 
714 
474 
862 
450 

597 

448 
996 
474 

817 
458 

351 

398 
287 


5 
5 
5 
5 
20 
20 

310 

310 

5 

5 

25 

25 

65 

65 

15 

15 

5 

5 

455 
455 

415 
410 
325 


1,091 
405 
834 
447 
848 
445 

878 
452 
881 
380 
788 
486 
907 
462 

664 
496 
971 
445 

872 
455 

392 
472 
376 


5 
5 
5 
5 

20 
20 

325 

304 

5 

5 

25 

25 

64 

65 

15 

15 

5 

5 

469 
449 


1,063 
452 
723 
380 
823 
459 

862 
447 
872 
402 
769 
497 
898 
430 

692 
486 
874 
431 

856 
448 


5 
5 

5 

5 

20 

20 

305 

300 

5 

5 

25 

25 

60 

60 

15 

15 

5 

5 

445 
440 

364 
365 
300 


1,015 
406 
813 
393 
899 
422 

860 
428 
897 
386 
807 
488 
911 
445 

709 

486 

1,047 

352 

864 
433 

423 
526 
418 


5 
5 
5 
5 
20 
20 

285 

285 

5 

5 

25 

.25 

20 

20 

15 

15 

380 
380 


1,029 
340 
825 
381 
873 
404 

875 
391 

870 
389 
885 
505 
956 
376 

728 
481 


i 

5 
5 
5 
5 
20 
20 

215 

215 

5 

5 

25 

25 

15 

15 

15 

15 

5 

5 

310 
310 

230 
230 
164 


1,034 
320 
824 
382 
842 
365 

870 
387 
896 
372 
851 
504 
957 
412 

667 
434 
839 
388 

863 
397 

469 
605 
447 


5 
5 
5 
5 
14 
15 

145 

145 

5 

5 

25 

25 

5 

5 

204 
205 

160 
160 
100 


847 
310 
788 
335 
837 
353 

897 
379 
783 
325 
806 
438 
928 
371 

876 
380 

471 
621 
413 


j 1 
2 

j 3 
4 

i 5 

J 6 
7 
8 

i 9 
J 10 

11 


5,861 
5,926 

7,065 
7,042 
1 ,399 


832 

394 

222| 
183 
116, 


5,165 
5,172 

2,925 
2,918 
1,387 


850 
452 

293 
273 
197 


876 
401 


1- 



of the Weston Aqueduct, 1901 to 1903, Inclusive. 



4,346 


664 


2,266 


718 


490 


745 


275 


757 






183 


750 


93 


741 


39 


832 


14 


836 


h» 


4,169 


284 


3,141 


401 


523 


470 


291 


446 


- 


- 


191 


402 


90 


405 


58 


398 


15 


399 


J13 


431 


659 


228 


707 


98 


762 


82 


764 


- 


- 


66 


759 


25 


808 


12 


835 


- 


- 


'll 


405 


323 


268 


402 


102 


482 


89 


476 


_ 


- 


91 


449 


23 


433 


15 


436 


- 


- 


\ U 


130 


719 


104 


792 


73 


780 


85 


830 


- 


- 


65 


822 


34 


830 


29 


848 


14 


880 


I ir t 


127 


269 


103 


398 


67 


410 


78 


397 


- 


- 


61 


350 


24 


449 


38 


340 


15 


334 


jlo 


210 


639 


169 


730 


64 


744 


49 


765 


- 


- 


48 


769 


20 


827 


10 


971 


10 


952 


ha 


208 


314 
664 


166 


455 


68 

725 


491 

750 


49 
491 


490 

772 


- 


- 


50 
362 


418 
767 


20 
172 


433 

778 


10 
90 


434 

853 


10 

38 


426 
883 


j 10 


5,117 


2,767 


721 


_ 


_ 




4,909 


288 


3,678 


403 


760 


468 


507 


448 


- 


- 


393 


418 


157 


419 


121 


388 


40 


381 




4,474 


164 


2,569 


253 


220 


320 


159 


355 






186 


350 


92 


380 


63 


373 


24 


405 


(17 


4,415 


128 


2,586 


242 


217 


335 


168 


383 


- 


- 


146 


355 


99 


349 


55 


335 


20 


333 


833 


205 


409 


269 


63 


312 


52 


356 


- 


- 


32 


394 


25 


402 


15 


404 


_ 


- 


J18 


833 


174 
170 


431 


246 


69 
283 


345 

318 


51 


395 







30 

218 


467 
357 


20 
117 


501 

378 


15 

78 


541 

379 


24 


405 


5,307 


2,978 


255 


211 


355 




5,248 


136 


3,017 


242 


286 


338 


219 


386 


~ 


- 


176 


374 


119 


374 


70 


379 


20 


333 





L78 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc 



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No. 57.] 



AND SEWEKAGE BOAKD. 



179 



Table No. 2. — Rainfall in Inches at Jefferson, Mass., in 1905. 



Day op Month. 



















>* 




|4 




>) 














43 




o 


>, 


u 












• 


,0 


p? 


.O 


cS 

P 

a 
as 

■"8 


a 

a 

ft 
<v 


Si 
o 

S- 

3 


pi 

«1 


as 


a 

P 
■■3 




31 
P 

be 

P 

< 


a 

P< 

CD 

02 


o 

+a 
U 

o 


a 

a 

> 
o 



1, ■ 










- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.05 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2, 










i 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.25 


0.08 


0.03 


1 


- 


- 


1 


3, 










i 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


1.30 


4, • 

5, . 

6, . 










1.608 


- 


- 


1 
1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5.38 


- 


0.65 


- 










l 


0.80 s 


- 


1.21 


_ 


0.57 


- 


0.13 


0.14 


- 


0.50 


- 


7, 










1.90* 


- 


1 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


8, 










- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


0.48 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


e, 










- 


l 


0.653 


- 


0.14 


- 


0.35 


0.38 


- 


- 


- 


1 


10, 










- 


0.403 


0.42 


1 


- 


- 


1.30 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.952 


11, 










i 


- 


- 


0.75 


- 


- 


- 


0.46 


1 


1 


- 


- 


12, 










0.653 


i 


- 


- 


1 


0.73 


- 


0.08 


0.67 


0.76 


- 


- 


13, 










- 


0.473 


- 


- 


0.14 


0.81 


0.07 






- 


- 


- 


14, 










- 


- 


- 


- 


0.07 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


15, 










- 


0.02 2 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


0.26 


- 


16, 










- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


1.01 


- 


- 


- 


- 


17, 










- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


0.47 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


18, 










- 


- 


- 


- 


0.32 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


19, 










- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


1 


0.08 


- 


1 


1 


- 


- 


20, 










- 


0.042 


1 


- 


- 


1 . 


- 


- 


0.45 


1.13 


- 


- 


21, 










l 


- 


1 


0.43 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1.14 


22, 










0.322 


- 


1.608 


- 


- 


2.61 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


23, 










- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.14 


24, 










•i 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.04 


- 


- 


25, 










l 


- 


1.25 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.55 


- 


- 


- 


- 


26, 










1.40 2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.29 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


27, 










- 


- 


0.23 


- 


0.09 


- 


- 


0.06 


- 


- 


- 


- 


28, 










0.06 2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


29, 










- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1.46 


0.56 


30, 










- 


- 


0.12 


- 


0.06 


- 


1 


0.41 


- 


- 


- 


- 


31, 










- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1.48 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


T 


otal, 




5.93 


1.73 


4.27 


2.39 


0.82 


5.74 


3.83 


3.16 


6.64 


1.93 


2.87 


4.09 



Total for the year, 43.40 inches. 
1 Rainfall included in that of following day. 2 Snow. 



3 Rain and snow. 



L80 



METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc, 



Table No. :>. — Rainfall in Inches at Framingham % Mass., in 1905. 



Pay OF Month. 


L 

ea 

a 
a 
ea 
•-a 


>. 

h 
OS 

3 

c 

9 


u 
1 


<3 




a 
p 


>> 

•"5 


i 

3 

M 

9 
< 


9 

X) 

E 
■ 

9 


u 

o 
o 
O 


la 

x> 
S 

9 
> 


u 

a 

■ 

6 

(5 


1, 










- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.02 


0.18 


- 


- 


- 












i 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.20 


- 


i 


i 


- 


i 


3, 










i 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.05 


i 


0.08 


1 


i 


4. 










1.58» 


- 


0.02 2 


i 


- 


- 


- 


- 


6.28 


- 


0.56 


1.18» 


•\ 










- 


1 


- 


i 


0.03 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


6, 










1 


0.97 s 


- 


1.31 


0.04 


0.46 


- 


- 


0.03 


- 


0.33 


- 


7, 










1.91 s 


0.022 


i 


- 


- 


i 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


8, 












- 


0.76 


- 


- 


0.58 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


9, 












l 


i 


- 


0.04 


- 


0.06 


0.08 


- 


- 


- 


i 


10, 










- 


0.46 s 


0.39 


- 


- 


- 


0.65 


0.08 


- 


- 


- 


0.72 2 


11, 










l 


- 


- 


0.75 


- 


0.07 


0.04 


- 


l 


l 


- 


- 


12, 










0.58 


0.61 s 


- 


- 


0.08 


1.04 


- 


0.22 


0.39 


0.37 


- 


- 


13, 










! * 


0.01 2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.02 


- 


- 


- 




- 


14, 












- 


- 


- 


0.16 


- 


0.49 


- 


- 


- 




- 


15, 










- 


- 


- 


0.02 


i 


- 


.- 


i 


- 


- 


0.07 


- 


16, 










- 


- 


~ 


- 


0.21 


- 


- 


0.85 


0.02 


- 


- 


- 


17, . 










- 


- 


- 


- 


0.15 


- 


0.23 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


18, . 










- 


- 


- 


- 


0.23 


- 


- 


- 


l 


0.07 


- 


- 


19, 










- 


- 


l 


- 


- 


i 


0.62 


- 


l 


l 


- 


- 


20, 










- 


0.05 2 


0.25 


i 


- 


0.63 


- 


0.02 


0.26 


0.87 


- 


- 


21, . 










l 


- 


l 


0.56 


- 


0.76 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1.04 


22, 

91 










0.24'-* 


- 


0.75 2 


- 


- 


0.83 


- 


0.27 


- 


- 


- 


0.15 


£6, 

24, 










l 


- 


l 


- 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


0.02 


0.01 


25, 

OR 










0.98 2 


- 


0.98 
i 


- 


- 


i 


- 


0.35 


- 


- 


- 


- 


27, 










- 


- 


0.03 


- 


0.16 


0.66 


- 


0.16 


. 


- 


_ 


- 


28 










0.01 2 


- 


0.01 


- 


- 


- 


- 


i 


- 


- 


1 


l 


29, 










- 


- 


- 


0.02 


- 


- 


l 


0.11 


- 


- 


0.97 


0.92 


30, 










- 


- 


0.02 


- 


0.13 


- 


l 


0.28 


- 


- 


- 


- 


31, 










- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2.90 


0.05 


- 


- 


- 


0.01 2 


T 


otal, 




5.30 


2.12 


3.21 


2.66 


1.23 


5.03 


5.21 


2.54 


7.16 


1.41 


1.94 


4.02 



Total for the year, 41.83 inches. 
1 Rainfall included in that of following day. 2 Snow. 



3 Rain and snow. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



181 



Table No. 4. — Rainfall in Inches at Chestnut Hill Reservoir in 1905. 



Date. 


a 

a 
o 

a 

< 


Duration. 


Date. 


□ 
a 
o 

2 


Duration. 


Jan. 2, 
Jan. 4, 
Jan. 6, 
Jan. 7, 
Jan. 11, 
Jan. 12, 
Jan. 21, 
Jan. 22, 
Jan. 24, 
Jan. 25, 
Jan. 28, 

Total, 






j 1.47 1 

1.88i 

0.60 

0.15 2 

1.322 
0.07 2 

5.49 


10.15 a.m. to 

2.30 P.M. 
4.55 A.M. to 

8.10 A.M. 

11.20 p.m. to 

7.00 a m. 
7.30 p.m. to 

2 20p.m 
6.30 p.m. to 

11.35 p.m. 
1.30 p.m. to 5.00 pm. 


June 2, 
June 6, 
June 7, 
June 8, 
June 11, 
June 13, 
June 19, 
June 22, 
June 26, 
June 27, 
June 28, 
June 29, 

Total, 




0.02 
0.51 

j 0.68 

J 1.60 
2.00 

j 0.41 

0.14 
0.02 

5.38 


3.50 p.m. to 6.10 p.m. 
1.30 a.m. to 5.15 p.m. 
8.30 P.M. to 

1.00 P.M. 
10.05 P.M. to 

2.45 A.M. 
4.30 a.m. to 

5.45 A.M. 
2.15 A M. to 

7 20 p.m. 

11.30 A.M. to 3.00 pm. 

1.15 P.M. to 1 30 P.M 




j 1.052 

0.602 

J 0.562 
0.062 

2.27 


6.00 A.M. to 

4.00 P.M. 
8.00 p.m. to 

3.10 A.M. 

"4.30 p.m. to 

4.45 P.M. 
11.00 A.M. to 6 00 PM. 






Feb. 6, 
Feb. 7, 
Feb. 8, 
Feb. 10, 
Feb. 12, 
Feb. 13, 
Feb. 20, 

Total, 






July 2, 
July 3, 
July 10, 
July 14, 
July 16, 
July 17, 
July 19, 
July 29, 
Aug 1, 




j 0.31 

0.04 

0.823 

0.06 

0.02 

0.04 

J 0.63 
1.92 


5.15 A.M. to 

3.00 A.M. 
4.20 A M. to 6.40 A M. 
6.05 P.M. to 11.55 P M. 
10.05 P.M. to 11.25 p.m. 
5.45 A.M. to 8.10 am. 
1.35 p.m. to 5 00 pm. 
4.45 P.M. to 

7.00 A.M. 


Mar. 4, 




0.052 

J 0.91 

0.40 
0.24 
0.03 

J 1.04» 

0.53 

0.04 
0.10 

3.34 


5.05 a.m. to 3 30 p.m. 
10.00 p.m. to 

12.25 p.m. 

8.00 p.m. to 11.25 p.m. 

6.05 a.m. to 10.30 p m 

1.20 A.M. to 7.30 a.m. 

11.45 A.M. to 

6.45 A.M. 
12.10 a m. to 

2.20 a.m. 

10.00 p.m. to 12.00 p.m. 

9.00 P.M. to 10.15 p.m. 


Total, . 




Mar. 7, 
Mar. 9, 
Mar. 10, 
Mar. 19, 
Mar. 20, 
Mar. 21, 
Mar. 22, 
Mar. 25, 
Mar. 26, 
Mar. 28, 
Mar. 30, . 

Total, 






Aug. 1, 
Aug. 2, 
Aug. 3, 
Aug. 9, . 
Aug. 12, 
Aug. 15, 
Aug. 16, 
Aug. 22, 
Aug. 24, 
Aug. 25, . 
Aug. 27, 
Aug. 29, . 
Aug. 30, 




0.02 
0.07 
0.09 
0.15 
1.06 
0.62 
0.18 
0.228 

J 0.29 

0.19 
0.11 
0.443 
0.03 

3.47 


7.00 A.M to 4.20 p.m. 

3.40 p.m. to 4.15 p.m. 

4.00 A.M. to 6.30 A.M. 

1.15 p.m. to 8 00 p.m. 
11.40 a m to 4.30 p.m. 

5.45 a.m. to 11.00 A M. 

3.30 pm. to 9.10 pm. 

6 05 p.m. to 6.45 PM. 
11.00 p.m. to 

3.20 pm. 

8.20 A.M. to 9.30 A.M. 

2.00 A.M. to 5.45 A.M. 

9.00 P.M. to 11.05 P M. 


Apr. 4, 
Apr. 6, 
Apr. 11, 
Apr. 12, 
Apr. 20, 
Apr. 22, 
Apr. 29, . 

Total, 






j 1.74 

J 0.82 

J 0.50 
0.02 

3.08 


10.40 p.m. to 

11.30 am. 
4.50 A.M. to 

1.30 a.m. 
6.10 p.m. to 

3.15 A.M. 

4.30 p.m. to 8.00 p.m. 


Aug. 31, 
Total, . 


• 


4.35 A.M. to 10.20 a.m. 


Sept. 2, . 
8ept. 4, 
Sept. 6, 
Sept. 11, . 
Sept. 13, 
Sept. 17, 
Sept 19 




J 5.24 
0.203 

J 0.24 

0.25 
5.93 


9.38 P.M. to 

2.35 P.M. 
5.55 P.M. to 6.30 p.m. 
3.30 p.m. to 

1.30 a.m. 
11.20 p.m. -to 

12.45 A M. 


May 6, 

May 7, 






0.04 

0.043 

0.07 

J 0.06 

J 0.30 

0.373 

0.62 

0.15 

1.65 


2.05 A M. to 4.00 A.M. 
1.05 A M.to 4.15 A.M. 
5.10 a.m. to 8.00 a.m. 
2.55 A.M. to 

1.15 A.M. 

1.10 P M. tO 

12.30 a.m. 
1.00 A.M. to 9.15 P.M 
5.45 a.m. to 8.15 A. M 
1.05 A.M. tO 2.10 AM. 


Total, . 


May 9, 
May 12, 
May 13, 
May 14, 
May 16, 
May 18, 
May 19, 
May 30, 

Total, 


Oct. 3, 
Oct. 11, 
Oct. 12, 
Oct. 19, 
Oct. 22, 
Oct. 24, 
Oct. 25, 

Total, 




0.07 
j 0.30 

j 1.14 

J 0.02 

1.53 


3.30 a.m. to 7.00 A.M. 
9.40 p.m. to 

5.50 a.m. 
10.20 p.m. to 

8.30 a.m. 
9.30 p.m. to 

1.30 A.M, 



1 Rain and enow. 



2 Snow. 



3 Thunder Btorm. 



L82 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doo, 



Table No. 1. — Rainfall in Inches at Chestnut Hill Reservoir in 190;~> — 

Concluded. 





<-• 
□ 








a 




I'ATE. 


o 
E 
< 


Duration 


Date. 


o 

a 

4 


Duration. 


3, 
Not. 4, 






( 0.81 


12.05 A m. to 


7.00 a.m. 


Dee. 2, 
Dee. 3, 






I 1.23 


9.30 p.m. to 

3.15 p.m. 


6, 

7, 






jo.33 


9.00 a.m. to 


4.00 a.m. 


Dee. 9, 

Dec. 10, 






j 1.122 


8.45 p.m. to 

12.25 A.M. 


Nov. 16, 

Nov. 16, 






j 0.08 


7.00 p.m. to 


1.4J A M. 


!><•<•. 21, 
Dec. 23, 






1.05 
0.19 


4.30 a.m. to 2.80 i-.m. 
7.20 a.m. to 6.80 P.M. 


Nun. 24. 
Nov. . 






j 0.03 


9.50 p.m. to 


2.00 a.m. 


Dec. 29, 
Jan. 1, *06 


. 




0.65 
0.03 8 


3.55 a.m. to 1.20 p.m. 
2.50 a.m. to 5.25 a.m. 


28, 
Nov. 9 






J 1.26 


5.00 P.M. to 


9.45 p.m. 


Total, . 


4.27 




Total, . 


2.51 













1 Rain and snow. 



Total for the year, 40.84 inches. 
2 Snow. 



8 Thunder storm. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD, 



183 






1 



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184 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc, 



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No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



199 



Table No. 19. — Average Daily Consumption of Water during the Year 1905, 
in the Cities and Towns supplied by the Metropolitan Water Works, includ- 
ing Boston, Somerville, Chelsea, Maiden, Everett, Quincy, Medford, Mel- 
rose, Revere, Watertown, Arlington, Lexington, Milton, Stoneham, Winthrop, 
Swampscott, Belmont, Nahant and a Small Portion of Saugus. (For Con- 
sumption of Water in Whole Metropolitan Water District, see Table No. 23.) 



Month. 



Average 

Daily 

Consumption 

(Gallons). 



Estimated 
Population. 



Consumption 

per 

Inhabitant 

(Gallons). 



January, . 

February, 

March, 

April, 

May, 

June, 

July, 

August, . 

September, 

October, . 

November, 

December, 

For the year, 



127,669,000 
137,491,000 
117,897,000 
108,800,000 
112,422,000 
114,028,000 
121,178,000 
117,826,000 
116,790,000 
114,831,000 
1J3,431,000 
119,593,000 



118,398,000 



895,600 
896,770 
897,950 
899,130 
900,300 
901,200 
902,090 
902,980 
903,870 
904,760 
905,650 
906,540 



902,090 



143 
153 
131 
121 
125 
127 
134 
131 
129 
127 
125 
132 



131 



Table No. 20. — Average Daily Consumption of Water, in Gallons, from the 

Low-service System in 1905. 



Month. 



Southern 
Low Service. 



Boston, 

excluding 

East Boston 

and 
Charlestown. 



January, 
February, 
March, . . 
April, . 
May, . 
June, . 
July, . 
August, 
September, . 
October, 
November, . 
December, . 

For the year, 



52,070,000 
54,276,000 
47,677,000 
44,059,000 
45,206,000 
45,685,000 
47,229,000 
46,466,000 
46,001,000 
44,628,000 
44,925,000 
47,487,000 



47,106,000 



Northern 
Loav Service. 



Portions of Charles- 
town, Somerville, 
Chelsea, Everett, 
Maiden, Medford, 
East Boston and 
Arlington. 



33,044,000 
37,050,000 
29,048,000 
25,071,000 
25,220,000 
24,977,000 
27,784,000 
28,119,000 
27,896,000 
27,802,000 
26,813,000 
28,958,000 



28,436,000 



Total 
Low-service 
Consumption. 



85,114,000 
91,326,000 
76,725,000 
69,130,000 
70,426,000 
70,662,000 
75,013,000 
74,585,000 
73,897,000 
72,430,000 
71,738,000 
76,445,000 



75,542,000 



200 



METROPOLITAN WATEB 



[Pub. Doc, 



Table No. 21. — 
High 



Average Daily Consumption' of 
service and Extra High-service 



Water, in Gallons, from the 
Systems in 1905. 











South i: iiN 

lln.ii 
SSRVK K. 


Souths bm 

Extra limn 
Si:i;\ 


northern 
High Service. 


Northern 

Extra High 

Service. 


Month. 


Quincy, Wutii- 

town, Belmonl 

and PorUooj 

of Boston and 

Milton. 


Portions of 

Boston 
and Milton. 


Revere, Winthrop, 

Swampscott, Nahant, 

Stoneham, Melrose, 

and Portions of 

Boston, Chelsea, 

Everett, Maiden, 

Medford, 8omerville 

and Saugua. 


Lexington 

and 

Portion 

of Arlington. 


January, . 








33,539,000 


555,000 


7,956,000 


505,000 


February, 








35,985,000 


567,000 


9,077,000 


536,000 


March, 








32,218,000 


555,000 


7,898,000 


501,000 


April, . 








30,898,000 


541,000 


7,709,000 


522,000 


May, 








32,401,000 


662,000 


8,315,000 


618,000 


June, 








33,328,000 


668,000 


8,733,000 


637,000 


July, 








34,593,000 


769,000 


10,040,000 


763,000 


August, . 








33,234,000 


673,000 


8,679,000 


655,000 


September, 








33,470,000 


655,000 


8,146,000 


622,000 


October, . 








33,629,000 


677,000 


7,508,000 


587,000 


November, 








33,436,000 


654,000 


7,062,000 


541,000 


December, 








34,345,000 


646,000 


7,633,000 


524,000 


For the ye 


ar, 


33,409,000 


636,000 


8,226,000 


585,000 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



201 



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204 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table K - Consumption of Water in the Metropolitan Water District, as 

constituted in the )\<ir 1905 % the Town of Stuampscott and a Small Section 
of //< Town of 8augus % from 1893 to loo:>. 

[ Qalloni per Day.] 



Month. 


l h»:\. 


IS'.H. 


. 1893. 


1806. 


1897. 


1898. 


1899. 


January, . 


75,209,000 


67,506,000 68,925,000 


82,946,000 


85,366,000 


83,880,000 


96,442,000 


February, 








! 71,900,000 68,94-1,000 80,876,000 


87,021,000 83,967,000 


87,475,000 


103,454,000 


Ifaroh, . 








67,638,000 62,710,000 09,543,000 


86,111,000 


82,751,000 


85,468,000 


90,200,000 


April, . 








62,309,000 57,715,000 62,909,000 


77,529,000 


79,914,000 


76,574,000 


86,491,000 


May, 








61,025,000 60,676,000 65,194,000 


73,402,000 


76,772,000 


76,677,000 


89,448,000 


June, 








63,374,000 


68,329,000 69,905,000 


77,639,000 


77,952,000 


83,463,000 


97,691,000 


July, 








69,343,000 


73,642,000 69,667,000 80,000,000 


85,525,000 


88,228,000 


96,821,000 


August, . 








! 66,983,000 


67,995,000 72,233,000! 78,537,000 


84,103,000 


87,558,000 


92,072,000 


September, 








64,654,000 


67,137,000 


73,724,000 74,160,000 


84,296,000 


88,296,000 


91,478,000 


October, 








63,770,000 


62,735,000 


67,028,000 71,762,000 


79,661,000 


81,770,000 


89,580,000 


November, 








61,204,000 


62,231,000 


64,881,000 71,933.000 


72,762,000 


78,177,000 


86,719,000 


December, 








66,700,000 


65,108,000 70,443,000 79,449,000 


76,594,000 


86,355,000 


85,840,000 


Average for the year, . 


66,165,000 


65,382,000 


69,499,000 78,360,000 


80,793,000 


83,651,000 


92,111,000 


Population 


723,153 


743,354 763,557 


786,385 


809,213 


832,042 


854,870 


Consumption per inhabitant, 


91.5 


88.0 


91.0 


99.7 


99.8 


100.5 


107.8 



Month. 


1900. 1901. 


1902. 


1903. 


1904. 


1905. 


January, . 

February, 

March, 

April, 

May, 

June, 

July, 

August, . 

September, 

October, . 

November, 

December, 








• 


100,055,000 

98,945,000 

97,753,000 

89,497,000 

87,780,000 

98,581,000 

107,786,000 

102,717,000 

103,612,000 

98,358,000 

93,648,000 

97,844,000 


111,275,000 
117,497,000 
105,509,000 
93,317,000 
95,567,000 
103,420,000 
106,905,000 
102,815,000 
102,103,000 
103,389,000 
101,324,000 
113,268,000 


118,435,000 
117,268,000 
108,461,000 
103,153,000 
106,692,000 
1 10,002,000 
108,340,000 
107,045,000 
107,752,000 
106,560,000 
105,175,000 
125,434,000 


125,176,000 
122,728,000 
111,977,000 
107,179 : 000 
111,589,000 
105,590,000 
107,562,000 
103,570,000 
106,772,000 
103,602,000 
103,477,000 
114,721,000 


137,771,000 
143,222,000 
123,334,000 
108,688,000 
111,715,000 
111,209,000 
113,584,000 
112,836,000 
114,188,000 
108,290,000 
108,054,000 
125,119,000 


130,878,000 
140,595,000 
120,879,000 
111,898,000 
115,804,000 
117,441,000 
124,769,000 
121,158,000 
120,103,000 
118,301,000 
116,693,000 
122,696,000 


Average fc 
Population, 
Consumption ] 


>rth< 

>er ii 


s yea 
ihab 


r, 
tant 


98,059,000 104,645,000 
877,698 892,740 
111.7 117.2 


110,345,000 
907,780 
121.6 


110,277,000 118,114,000 
922,820 937,860 
119.5 125.9 


121,671,000 
953,556 
127.6 



This table includes the water consumed in the cities and towns enumerated in Table No. 19, together 
with the water consumed in Newton and Hyde Park, which are included in the Metropolitan Water 
District but have not been supplied from the Metropolitan Works. The populations for the years 1901 
to 1904 have been revised since the census of 1905 became available, and consequently differ from those 
published in a corresponding table in the preceding annual report. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



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No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



211 



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212 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



TABLE NO, 80. — Chemical Examinations of Water fr 

from 1802 to 1905. 



om a Faucet in Boston, 













[Tarts 


per 100,000.] 
















Color. \ 


ItESIDl 1 

Evaporation. 


Ammonia. 


s 

a 

•c 

o 


Nitrogen 
as 


■6 
s 

s 

9 
■ 
a 
o 

o 

a 

ac 
>> 
M 

o 




Year. 


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s 


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d a 
a s 


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o 


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O be 
■ 

o 


6 


ALBUMINOID. 


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a 






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> 

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o 
•a 


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00 

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a 

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u 

i 
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189-:, . 


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37 


4.70 


1.67 


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.41 


.0210 


.0001 


- 


1.9 


1893, . 


.61 


53 


4.54 


1.84 


.0010 


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.0147 


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1.8 


1894, . 


.69 


58 


4.64 


1.83 


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1.7 


1895, . 


.72 


59 ! 


4.90 


2.02 


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0.7 


1896, . 


.49 


45 


4.29 


1.67 


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.37 


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1.4 


1897, . 


.65 


55 


4.82 


1.84 


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.0177 


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.40 


.0137 


.0001 


.64 


1.6 


1898, . 


.41 


40 


4.19 


1.60 


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1.4 


1899,. 


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28 


3.70 


1.30 


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1.1 


1900, . 


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29 


3.80 


1.20 


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1.3 


1901, . 


.24 


29 


4.43 


1.64 


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1.7 


1902, . 


.26 


30 


3.93 


1.56 | 


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.0000 


.40 


1.3 


1903, . 


.25 


29 


3.98 


1.50 


.0013 


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.0110 


.0015 


.30 


.0142 


.0001 


.39 


1.5 


1904, . 


.23 


28 


3.93 


1.59 


.0023 


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.34 


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.87 


1.5 


1905,. 


.24 


» 


3.89 


1.67 


.0020 


.0148 


.0126 


.0022 


.36 


.0078 


.0001 


.36 


1.4 



Note relating to Chemical Examinations of Water, Tables Nos. 24-30. 
The chemical examinations contained in the tables were made by the 
State Board of Health. Colors have been determined by the Nessler 
standard, but the corresponding values by the platinum standard are also 
given, for the purpose of comparison with colors determined in the labora- 
tory of the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board, as given in subsequent 
tables. The odor recorded is taken in such a way that it is a much stronger 
odor than would be noticed in samples drawn directly from a tap or col- 
lected directly from a reservoir. The more important samples are collected 
and examined monthly ; those of less significance, at intervals of two or 
three months. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



213 



Table No. 81. — Colors of Water from Various Parts of the Metropolitan Water 
Works in 1905. {Means of Weekly Determinations.) 

[Platinum Standard.] 









Wachusett 
Reservoir. 


Sudbury 
Reservoir. 


Framingham 

Reservoir 

No. 3. 


8pot 
Pond. 


Fells 
Reservoir. 


Month. 


a 

a 

P 
OQ 


CD 
T3 


B 
o 

o 
pq 


co" 
^0D 


X 

P 

co c3 
P « 

cW 

<4 


co* 

« 

p 


X5 

o 

73 

73 

s 


a 

o 

.J 

o 

pq 


a 

CO 

O, . 
0"3J 

a 

O cj 
730 

a 
H 


co 
73 

i 


A 

P. 
CO 
73 

73 

s 


CO 

co 
P 
O 

A 

s « 


January, . 

February, 

March, 

April, 

May, 

June, 

July, 

August, . 

September, 

October, . 

November, 

December, 






33 
28 
23 
21 
20 
25 
23 
23 


34 

28 
23 
25 
21 
25 
23 
24 


35 
28 
24 
23 
24 
26 
24 
24 


43 
45 
49 
47 
66 
40 
47 
59 


26 
32 
41 
39 
35 
28 
23 
21 
21 
25 
23 
24 

28 


24 
34 
26 
29 
34 
27 
20 
19 
18 
23 
23 
22 

25 


21 

28 
30 
29 
34 
27 
21 
19 
18 
23 
23 
22 

25 


20 
26 
31 
29 
34 
27 
22 
20 
18 
24 
23 
22 

24 


55 
34 
71 
88 
36 
50 
24 
22 
106 
26 
26 
43 

48 


22 
24 
29 
31 
32 
27 
22 
20 
24 
24 
23 
21 


21 
21 
25 
24 
23 
20 
18 
16 
17 
17 
18 
18 

20 


20 
21 
22 
22 
21 
21 
17 
15 
15 
15 
16 
15 


Mean, 






25 


18 



Table No. 31 — Concluded. 

[Platinum Standard.] 





Lake Cochituate. 


Chestnut Hill 
Reservoir. 


Northern 
Service. 


Southern 
Service. 


Month. 








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iburton 
oston 
•vice). 




co 
a 

08 
U-l 

u 


— < 

P. 

V 
73 

73 


S 
o 

o 


m 

*a 

a 

CO 

3 

ep. 


CO 


§1 

CO 

■2^ 


£5^ 

CO 

°P 


ap at Gk 
Yard, M 
(Low Ser 


ap at H 
Street, Fi 
tion, Ev 
(High Sei 


ap at 244 B 
Street, B 
(Low Ser 


apatl As! 
Place, B 
(High Sei 




rji ' 


i 


pq 


h- 1 


HH 


i— i 


H 


H 


H 


H 


H 


Jauuary, 


41 


29 


31 


73 


25 




27 


27 


21 


25 


28 


February, . 


47 


28 


30 


71 


29 


34 


26 


25 


20 


25 


26 


March, 


38 


29 


31 


75 


36 


40 


39 


37 


25 


37 


37 


April, .... 


36 


36 


36 


84 


32 


35 


32 


28 


22 


30 


o'a 


May 


33 


32 


34 


100 


33 


32 


29 


29 


21 


31 


31 


June 


28 


29 


36 


108 


34 


25 


31 


31 


21 


31 


31 


July 


23 


28 


40 


96 


32 


22 


30 


31 


17 


26 


29 


August, 


20 


25 


43 


57 


36 


21 


29 


28 


16 


26 


26 


September, . 


23 


28 


102 


59 


25 


23 


27 


26 


17 


23 


27 


October, 


27 


30 


126 


89 


30 


25 


27 


26 


19 


27 


27 


November, . 


28 


28 


47 


88 


37 


28 


35 


37 


18 


28 


33 


December, . 


27 
31 


28 
29 


31 

49 


83 


34 


27 


33 


34 


18 


29 


31 


Mean, . 


82 


32 


- 


30 


30 

I 


20 


28 


30 



1 The colors given in this column represent the combined colors of the waters of the four principal 
feeders. The color of each is determined monthly, and due weight is given, in combining the results, to 
the sizes of the streams. 



•21 I 



MKTKOPOLITAN WATKR 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table No. 32. — Temperatures of Water from Various Parts of the Metropolitan 
Water Works in 1906. (Means of Weekly Dctcrmi?ialio?is.) 

[The temperatures are taken at the came places and times as the samples for microscopical examination ; 
the depth given for each reeervoir 1h the depth from high water mark.] 

I legreM Fahrenheit.] 




Table No. 32 — Concluded. 

[Degrees Fahrenheit.] 











Chestnut 

Hill 
Reservoir. 


Spot Pond (Depth at 

Place of Observation 

28.0 Feet). 


Northern 
Service. 


1 

Southern 
Service. 












T3T3 


S a . 


a a 


a a . 












go- 


3, « — 


o o^ 


2 o<~> 




o 








a ••g 
3-3 


CT3 S 




** •*» § 


Month. 


O 3 




A 




Clare 

Mai 

Servh 


4 Boy] 
t, Bo 
Bervic 


3 on .2 

•a ° fe 




c3 


o 
a 


ft 

4) 


a 


trfg 


32 ** ja 
*j £ bo 


22* 






1 


3 


2 


o 
o 


08 ° 


apa 
Sin 
(Hi 


a u o 
§•02 w 


— — ■ 




H 


m 


§ 


pq 


H 


H 


CH 


H 


January, .... 


35.4 


36.2 


36.6 


37.4 


37.5 


38.9 


37.9 


38.0 


February, 








35.4 


36.8 


37.6 


38.5 


36.4 


36.0 


38.0 


37.8 


March, 








37.1 


37.0 


37.8 


38.5 


36.9 


38.6 


38.4 


38.9 


April, 








45.6 


43.4 


43.4 


43.4 


43.4 


43.4 


46.4 


46.2 


May, . 








58.6 


57.0 


56.6 


56.1 


54.3 


53.1 


58.4 


58.3 


June, 








68.3 


66.5 


65.6 


62.0 


62.8 


64.9 


66.3 


67.3 


July, 








75.0 


74.6 


73.0 


64.3 


70.9 


71.5 


71.2 


74.5 


August, . 








72.4 


72.7 


72.4 


67.6 


68.8 


71.3 


72.4 


73.0 


September, 








66.9 


66.6 


66.6 


66.4 


65.3 


66.0 


67.0 


67.3 


October, . 








58.8 


58.1 


58.0 


58.1 


59.1 


59.0 


62.0 


60.9 


November, 








44.8 


44.5 


44.5 


44.5 


47.5 


46.1 


47.4 


48.2 


December, 








37.5 


36.0 
52.5 


36.3 

52.4 


36.5 
51.1 


40.9 


39.0 


41.9 


42.2 


Mean, 








53.0 


52.0 


52.3 


53.9 


54.4 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



215 



Table No. 33. — Temperatures of the Air at Three Stations on the Metropolitan 

Water Works in 1905. 

[Degrees Fahrenheit.] 











Chestnut Hill 
Reservoir. 


Framingham. 


Clinton. 


Month. 


a 

s 

a 

as 

3 


a 

?! 
a 
a 

9 


a 

e3 


a 

3 

a 

cS 


a 

3 

a 

'3 

9 


a 

CS 
CO 


a 

s 

a 

CJ 


a 

3 

a 


a 

OS 
o 

3 


January, . 








50.5 


—3.5 


23.5 


56.0 


—9.0 


22.8 


48.0 


—6.0 


20. & 


February, 








45.0 


—2.0 


21.2 


54.0 


—8.0 


20.7 


42.5 


—4.5 


17.9* 


March, 








71.5 


9.0 


35.7 


69.0 


5.0 


34.1 


69.0 


7.0 


32.4 


April, 








77.0 


27.0 


47.9 


78.0 


24.0 


48.2 


77.0 


26.0 


45.4 


May, . 








85.0 


32.5 


56.8 


83.0 


29.0 


57.8 


81.0 


32.0 


56.7 


June, 








92.0 


38.5 


64.8 


90.0 


35.0 


63.9 


89.0 


37.5 


64.2 


July, . 








95.5 


50.0 


73.2 


93.0 


50.0 


71.0 


90.0 


50.0 


71.1 


August, . 








92.0 


46.0 


68.4 


88.0 


41.0 


65.8 


85.5 


41.5 


65.9 


September, 








82.0 


33.0 


61.9 


80.0 


30.0 


59.4 


77.0 


34.5 


59.8 


October, . 








80.0 


25.0 


52.5 


79.0 


20.0 


50.4 


81.5 


20.0 


50.4 


November, 








65.0 


12.0 


40.2 


66.0 


10.0 


36.9 


61.0 


11.5 


37.4 


December, 








60.0 


9.0 


33.0 


58.0 


2.0 


30.9 

46.8 


58.0 


—2.5 


29.9 


Average, . 


- 


- 


48.3 


- 


46.0 



216 



METROPOLITAN WATKK 



[Pub. Doc. 







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No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



217 






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218 



MKTKOPOLITAX WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Fvr.i.K No. 37. — Number of Service Pipes, Meters and Fire Hydrants in the 

St ''Jus ami Towns supplied by the Metropolitan Water Works. 



Citt on Town. 



Services. 



Meters. 



Fire 
Hydrants. 



Boston, 
Bomervllle, 

Maiden, 
Chelsea, 
Everett, 
Quincy, 
Medford, . 
Melrose, 
Revere, 
Watertown, 
Arlington, . 
Milton, 
Winthrop, . 
Stoneham, . 
Belmont, . 
Lexington, . 
Nahant, 
Swampecott, 
Total, . 



91,300 

11,279 

6.S29 

6,423 

4,999 

5,641 

4,216 

3,354 

2,700 

1,802 

1,894 

1,160 

1,908 

1,275 

710 

685 

400 

1,219 



147,794 



4,963 

2,092 

5,332 

634 

92 

194 

336 

110 

108 

1,687 

419 

1,160 

30 

22 

710 

15 

72 



17,976 



7,992 
1,001 
405 
306 
506 
689 
499 
289 
137 
327; 
363 
293 
120 
110 
160 
102 
67 
126 



13,492 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



219 












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55 


ON METKC 
rAN WATE 
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HBTTRTON 
PLACE. 




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220 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc, 



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No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



221 



Appendix No. 4. 



Water Works Statistics for the Year 1905. 

The Metropolitan Water Works supply the Metropolitan Water District, 
which includes the following cities and towns : — 



City or Town. 


Population, 

Census of 

1905. 


Citt or Town. 


Population, 

Census of 

1905. 




595,380 
69,272 
38,037 
37,289 
36,827 
29,111 
28,076 
19,686 
14,510 
14,295 
12,659 


Total population of Metropoli- 
tan "Water District. 


11,258 
9,668 
7,054 
7,034 
6,332 
4,530 
4,360 
922 




946,300 

5,141 

200 



1 No water supplied to these places during the year from Metropolitan Water Works. 

2 Not in the Metropolitan Water District, hut has been supplied with water from the Metropolitan 
Water Works. 

3 Only a small portion of Saugus is supplied with water. 



Sources of Supply, 



Source. 


Area of 

Watershed 

(Square Miles). 


Remarks, 


Nashua River (South Branch), . . 


18.87 

75.20 

118.31 


Works built by city of Boston in 1848. 
Works built by city of Boston in 1872-78. 
Works begun in 1895; not finished. 



Mode of Supply. 
25 per cent, from gravity. 
75 per cent, from pumping. 



222 



MKTROrOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Pumping. 
Chestnut Hill High'Strvice Station: — 

Builders of pumping machinery, Holly Manufacturing Company, Quintard Iron 
Works and K. 1'. Allis Company, 

Description of coal used : — Bituminous : Quemahoning, Priscilla and Georges 
Creek Cumberland; anthracite: buckwheat and screenings. Price per gross 
ton in bins: bituminous $4.12 to $5.2>\ buckwheat $3.02 to $3.58, screenings 
82.52. Average price per gross ton (3.93. Per cent, ashes, 11.5. 

Chestnut Hill Low-service Station: — 

Builders of pumping machinery, Holly Manufacturing Company. 

Description of coal used : — Bituminous : Quemahoning and Georges Creek Cum- 
berland ; anthracite : buckwheat. Price per gross ton in bins : bituminous 
$3.98 to $4.37, buckwheat $2.78 to $3.26. Average price per gross ton $3.78. 
Per cent, ashes, 12 3. 

Spot Pond Station : — 

Builders of pumping machinery, Geo. F. Blake Manufacturing Company and 

Holly Manufacturing Company. 
Description of coal used : — Bituminous : Quemahoning ; anthracite : buckwheat 

and screenings. Price per gross ton in bins : bituminous $4.38, buckwheat 

$3.75, screenings $2.24. Average price per gross ton $3.61. Per cent, ashes, 

12.1. 



Chestnut Hill High-service 

Station. 



Engines 

Nos. 
1 and 2. 



Engine 
No. 3. 



Engine 
No. 4. 



Daily pumping capacity (gallons), 

Coal consumed for year (pounds), 

Cost of pumping, figured on pumping station expenses, 
Total pumpage for year, corrected for slip (million gallons), 

Average dynamic head (feet), 

Gallons pumped per pound of coal 

Duty on basis of plunger displacement 

Cost per million'gallons raised to reservoir 

Cost per million gallons raised one foot, 



16,000,000 

1,985,452 

$9,311.51 

1,381.48 

120.87 

695.80 

76,310,000 

$6,740 

0.056 



20,000,000 

.424,881 

$2,090.02 

481.82 

128.01 

1,134.01 



30,000,000 

8,505,184 

$26,766.67 

10,564.86 

130.39 

1,242.17 



130,650,000 ] 139,070,000 

$4,338 $2,534 

0.034 0.019 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOAED. 



223 



Daily pumping capacity (gallons) 

Coal consumed for year (pounds) 

Cost of pumping, figured on pumping station expenses, 

Total pumpage for year, corrected for slip (million 

gallons). 
Average dynamic head (feet), . 

Gallons pumped per pound of coal, 

Duty on basis of plunger displacement, 

Cost per million gallons raised to reservoir, 

Cost per million gallons raised one foot, 




Chestnut Hill 

Low-service 

Station. 



Engines Nos. 5, 
6 and 7. 



105,000,000 

8,215,258 

$31,850.16 

20,104.86 

50.81 

2,447.26 

106,730,000 

$1,584 

0.031 



Spot Pond Station. 



Engine ISTo. 8. 



Engine No. 9. 



10,000,000 

190,381 

$1,217.28 

189.55 

119.05 

995.64 

100,770,000 

$6,422 

0.054 



20,000,000 

2,374,510 

$10,656.01 

2,818.20 

129.52 

1,186.86 

132,060,000 

$3,781 

0.029 



Consumption. 
Estimated total population of the nineteen cities and towns sup- 
plied wholly or partially during the year 1905, . 

Total consumption, gallons, 

Average daily consumption, gallons, 

Gallons per day to each inhabitant, 



902,090 

43,215,210,000 

118,398,000 

. 131.2 



Distribution. 



Owned and 

operated 

by Metropolitan 

Water and 
Sewerage Board. 



Total in District 

supplied 
by Metropolitan 
Water Works. 



Kinds of pipe used, 

Sizes, 

Extensions less length abandoned, miles, . 

Length In use, miles, 

Stop gates added, 

Stop gates now in use, 

Service pipes added 

Service pipes now in use, .... 

Meters added, 

Meters now in use 

Fire hydrants added 

Fire hydrants now in use, .... 



60 to 6 inch. 

— .41 

83.80 

4 

360 



i0 to 4 inch. 
13.14 

1,520.95 



1,933 

147,794 

2,730 

17,976 

203 

13,492 



1 Cast-iron and cement-lined wrought iron. 2 Cast-iron, cement-lined wrought iron and kalamine. 



224 METROPOLITAN WATKH [Pub. Doc. 



Appendix No. 5. 



Special Regulations of the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage 
Boakd relating to Boating and Fishing in the Waters of Lake 
cochitdate. 

Under and in pursuance of Rule 14 of the rules made by the State Board 
of Health on January 1, 1899, for the sanitary protection of waters used 
by the Metropolitan Water Board for the water supply of cities and towns 
in the Metropolitan Water District, and also under and in pursuance of the 
general powers and authority given to the Metropolitan Water and Sewer- 
age Board, the following special regulations relative to boating and fishing 
in the waters of Lake Cochituate were made on August 9, 1905, and De- 
cember 6, 1905 : — 

I. Special Regulation No. 1, adopted by the Metropolitan Water Board on June 
30, 1899, under and in pursuance of Rule 14 of the rules made by the State Board 
of Health on June 1, 1899, for the sanitary protection of waters used by the Metro- 
politan Water Board, and under and in pursuance of the general powers and 
authority given to the Metropolitan Water Board, which special regulation was 
readopted by the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board on May 10, 1901, is 
hereby rescinded, so far as it applies to fishing and boating in the waters of Lake 
Cochituate, after December 31, 1905, and the permission therein given shall^ 
beginning with January 1, 1906, and until further order, be to fish and boat only 
in or upon the waters of Farm Pond and Whitehall Reservoir, subject to the limi- 
tations and conditions in said regulations contained. 

II. No permission is given after December 31, 1905, to fish or boat in the 
waters of that portion of Lake Cochituate, which is situated northerly of the 
county road known as Lake Avenue. 

III. Permission is given during the season beginning with April 1 and ending 
with September 20, until further order, to fish from the highway and in boats 
which have been duly registered and numbered in accordance with the require- 
ments of the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board, in that portion of the 
waters of Lake Cochituate which is situated southerly of the county road known 
as Lake Avenue ; and permission is also given to enter from the highway and fish 
through the ice in said portion of the waters of Lake Cochituate, subject in both 
cases to the following limitations and conditions : — 

(a) No fish, food or other matter tending to pollute the water shall be thrown 
into the water or left upon the shores. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 225 

(b) No tin cans or bait boxes shall be thrown into the water or left upon the 
shores. 

(c) No person shall build any fire upon the shores or other land belonging to 
the Commonwealth or upon the ice of the lake. 

(d) Care shall be taken not to disturb the gravel or stone protection around the 
shores. 

(e) In case fishing is carried on through the ice, no person shall throw or leave 
upon the ice any fish, bait, food or other matter tending to pollute the water. 

(/) No permission is given to fish from the shores at places other than the 
highway. 

IV. Permission is given, in the year 1906 and until further order, during the 
season beginning with April 1 and ending with September 20, to boat in and upon 
that portion of the waters of Lake Cochituate which is situated southerly from 
the county road in Natick known as Lake Avenue, in boats which have been duly 
registered and numbered in accordance with the requirements of the Metropolitan 
Water and Sewerage Board ; but such permission shall apply only when one of 
the occupants of the boat is duly licensed by the said Board to use and operate a 
boat upon said lake. Such permission is subject to the limitations and conditions 
set forth in the rules for registration and licensing adopted by said Board. 



226 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Appendix No. 6 . 



Contracts made and pending during the Year 1905 — Sewerage Works. 

Contracts relating to the South Metropolitan System. 



1. 


2. 

WORK. 


3. 

Num- 
ber of 
Bids. 


Amount or Bid. 


6. 


Num- 
ber 
of Con- 
tract. 


4. 

Next to Low- 
est. 


5. 

Lowest. 


Contractor. 


16 


Section 77, High-level 
Sewer, Roxbury, pump- 
ing plant for Ward Street 
pumping station. 


3 


$207,000 00 


$204,000 00 

• 


Allis-Chalmers Co., Mil- 
waukee, Wis. 



7. 

Date 

of Contract. 


8. 

Date of 

Completion of 

Work. 


9. 

Prices of Principal Items of 
Contracts made in 1905. 


10. 

Value of Work 
done Decem- 
ber 31, 1905. 


Jan. 17, '02, 


- 


- 


$153,000 00 



No. 57.] AND SE WEE AGE BOARD. 227 



Appendix No. 7. 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

Supreme Judicial Court. 
Suffolk, ss In Equity. 

Henry H. Sprague, Henry P. Walcott and James A. Bailey, Jr., 
Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board, Petitioners. 

[In re The South Metropolitan Sewerage System, St. 1899, c. 424.] 

Report and Award. 

The Commissioners appointed in the above case, after clue notice, met 
the attorneys, solicitors and representatives of the several cities and towns 
named in the petition, and fully heard such evidence and arguments as 
were offered and made in behalf of each city and town, and now, after 
careful consideration of the same, award, determine and report to the 
Court as follows : — 

The petition is a petition for the appointment of commissioners under 
the provisions of section 16 of chapter 424 of the Acts of the year 1899, 
being entitled ' ' An Act to provide for the construction of a high-level 
gravity sewer for the relief of the Charles and Neponset River valleys," 
to determine the proportion in which each of the cities and towns compris- 
ing said system shall annually pay money into the treasury of the Com- 
monwealth for the term of five years, to meet the interest and sinking fund 
requirements for each of said years as estimated by the Treasurer, and 
to meet the cost of maintenance and operation of said system for each of 
said years as estimated by the said Board and certified to said Treasurer, 
and any deficiency in the amount previously paid in, as found by said 
Treasurer. 

There have been four Boards of Commissioners previously appointed by 
this Court to determine the proportion in which the several cities and towns 
should bear the costs of construction, maintenance and operation of the 



METROPOLITAN WATKK [Pub. Doc. 

Metropolitan sewers, under statutes substantially similar to the act in 
question. 

The first Hoard was appointee! in May, 1891, and made its report in 
November, 1891, in which the Commissioners say: — 

We have conn 1 to the conclusion thai there is, upon the whole, no method more 
jusl and equitable than to apportion the payments on account of the interest and 
sinking fund requirements of the loan which represents the first cost of the sys- 
tems with primary reference to the total taxable valuations of the several cities 
and towns; and the payments on account of the cost of maintenance and opera- 
tion with primary reference to their respective populations. 

The second Board was appointed in October, 1895, and made its report 
in October, 1896, adopting the same basis for the apportionment, and 

say : — 

We have been unable to find, upon the whole, any better measure of the ability 
and duty to contribute to the cost of public works of this character than the taxable 
valuations of the several cities and towns which compose the districts for whose 
common welfare these systems were created, or any better measures of the use 
enjoyed and the benefits received by the several municipalities than the number 
of persons who dwell within their respective limits. 

The third Board was appointed in March, 1900, being the first appor- 
tionment made for the South Metropolitan System, and in the report the 
Commissioners say: — 

There does not seem, on the whole, to be any fairer method of assessing the 
cost of construction of great public undertakings of this kind than that of assess- 
in £ such cost on the various cities and towns according to their taxable valuation. 
On the other hand, it is undoubted^ true that after construction the use made of 
the sewerage system by each city and town depends upon the number of inhabit- 
ants in such city or town ; and, as the cost of maintenance and operation is 
directly proportional to the amount of sewage discharged, i.e., the use made of the 
system, it would seem that the basis of population would be a just and equitable 
method of assessing such expense. 

The fourth Board was appointed in May, 1901, for the North Metro- 
politan System, and made its report, in which the Commissioners say : — 

We have been urged by the representatives of several municipalities to adopt a 
different method of distribution than that followed by the Commissioners who 
have previously made the apportionment; but the weight of opinion expressed at 
the hearings was verv clearlv in favor of continuing the methods hitherto adopted, 



No. 57.] AND SEWEEAGE BOAED. 229 

and in our judgment, particularly in view of precedent, the weight of argument 
demands such course. We are satisfied that the plan adopted accomplishes sub- 
stantial justice in the distribution of the burden in accordance with the benefits 
received. 

All of these reports were accepted by the Court, and the basis of ap- 
portionment approved. 

While we do not feel bound absolutely by the rule or basis of apportion- 
ment thus adopted, and should feel at liberty to correct any errors which the 
practical working of the rule might seem to us to require, or to deal with any 
new condition of things arising since the other apportionments were made, 
still, we cannot but feel that a rule thus adopted by four different Boards 
after full hearing and trial, and approved and sanctioned by this Court and 
acted on by all and acquiesced in by at least a very large majority of the 
municipalities affected for so many years, ought not to be departed from 
except for the strongest reasons. 

In the apportionment of the payments of the money needed to meet the 
requirements of the statute in question among the municipalities named in 
the act, it is manifest that any rule or basis adopted must be general in its 
application, to avoid any question of favoritism to any particular locality 
arising under it ; and must be made, too, so far as possible, with due regard 
to the rules and the general system or methods of taxation adopted and 
sanctioned by the laws of the Commonwealth. 

At the hearings before us the towns of Brookline and Milton both ob- 
jected to an apportionment based on the assessed valuation of the towns for 
the construction of the sewer, but made no objection to the basis of popu- 
lation for the cost of its maintenance and operation. Both of these towns 
are wealthy, residential towns, and the assessed valuation of each is large 
in proportion to its area and population, — very much larger than that of 
any other city or town in the District ; and it was urged upon us with a 
good deal of zeal and earnestness that, because of this large valuation, any 
apportionment made on the basis of it would work injustice and be inequi- 
table and unjust to these towns. 

We have examined the claims thus made, and we have examined also 
much of the evidence, arguments and suggestions made to the Commis- 
sioners who made the awards above referred to ; but we are unable to find 
that the claims made in behalf of these towns are well founded, or that 
either town has any just cause of complaint. On the contrary, we are 
clearly of the opinion that the basis of assessed valuation for the cost of 
construction and population as a basis for the cost of maintenance and 
operation, while open, of course, to some criticisms, approximates more 
nearly to a just and equitable apportionment than any other basis or method 



230 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

suggested or which has occurred to us. The rule is simple, plain and 
practicable, easily understood and easily applied, and accords most nearly 

with OUr established principles of taxation ; and we accordingly adopt this 

rule in making the apportionment. 

The valuations set forth in the tables are published in chapter 178 of the 
Acts of L904, and involve real and persona] estate, bank stock and ship- 
ping, and are the valuations used in assessing the State tax. For all of 
the contributing municipalities except Boston and Dedham the whole valua- 
tion of the city or town has been used. In Boston the South Metropolitan 
District embraces all of the Brighton District and parts of the Back Bay, 
Roxbury, AVest Roxbury and Dorchester districts. In the town of Dedham 
a small area of the southerly corner adjacent to the Neponset River is 
excluded. The valuation of the parts of Boston included in the district 
and of the parts of Dedham not excluded were compiled by or under the 
direction of the Chief Engineer of the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage 
Board, and were assumed by all parties to be correct. 

In the table of population the census determinations of 1900 are taken 
for all the cities and towns except Boston, and for those of Boston included 
in the District they are compiled from official sources under the direction of 
the Chief Engineer, aud are correct. 

The counsel for the town of Watertown asked us to exclude one hundred 
and five acres in the northwesterly and northerly part of the town, with a 
valuation of 8219,750 and a population of 333, from the valuation and 
population in making the apportionment, on the ground that this area 
cannot be drained into the South Metropolitan System without great ex- 
pense, and on the further ground that the town has applied to the Legisla- 
ture for the admission of that part of the town into the North System ; but, 
as the territory in question still lies in and forms a part of the South Dis- 
trict, we have not excluded it. 

No other city or town made any objection or suggested any change in 
the method of apportionment, although each city and town was represented 
before us by counsel at nearly all of the hearings held. 

1. Interest and Sinking Fund Requirements. — We therefore deter- 
mine and award that the several cities and towns in the South Metropolitan 
District shall annually pay money into the treasury of the Commonwealth 
for the term of five years, 1905 to 1909, both inclusive, to meet the inter- 
est and sinking fund requirements for each of said years, as estimated by 
said Treasurer, of the Metropolitan Sewerage Loan authorized and issued 
for the construction of said South Metropolitan System, including the in- 
terest and sinking fund requirements of the former Charles River valley 
and Neponset valley systems, so called, and any deficiency in the amount 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



231 



previously paid in, as found by said Treasurer, in the proportions in the 
right-hand column of the following table : — 



Table showing the Proportions in which the Several Cities and Towns in the South 
Metropolitan System shall pay Money to meet the Interest and Sinking Fund 
Requirements under St. 1899, c. 424. 



City ob Town. 



Valuation. 



Proportion 
(PerCent). 



Waltham 

Watertown, 

Newton 

f Brighton District, 
| Back Bay District, 
Boston, «{ Roxbury District, 

] West Roxbury District, 
I. Dorchester District, . 

Total for Boston, . 

Brookline 

Dedham, 

Hyde Park 

Milton, 

Quincy, 

Total 



$23,297,415 
12,921,271 
71,356,289 



$34,744,400 
37,160,800 
38,470,750 
35,322,200 
42,529,800 



188,227,950 
102,306,308 
10,965,988 
12,415,331 
25,435,822 
23,894,528 



$470,820,902 



4.95 

2.74 

15.16 



39.98 
21.73 
2.33 
2.64 
5.40 
5.07 



100.00 



2. Cost of Maintenance and Operation. — We determine and award 
that the several cities and towns in the South Metropolitan System shall 
annually pay money into the treasury of the Commonwealth for the term of 
five years, 1905 to 1909, both inclusive, to meet the cost of maintenance 
and operation of said systems for each of said years, as estimated by the 
Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board and certified to said Treasurer, 
and any deficiency in the amount previously paid in, as found by said 
Treasurer, in the proportion shown in the following table : — 



•2l\-2 



MKTKOPOUTAN WATEB 



[Pub. Doc. 



showing the Proportions in which the Cities and Towns in the South Metro- 
politan System ahull annually pay Money to meet (he Cost of Maintenance 

and Operation of Stud System under St. 1899, c. 424. 



City OB Town. 



Population. 
10OO. 



Proportion 
(Per Cent.)- 



Waltham 

Watertown, 

Newton, 

( Brighton District, . 
Back Bay District, 
Boston, ■{ Roxbury District, . 

I West Roxbury District, 
I, Dorchester District, 

Total for Boston, 

Brookline, 

Dedbam, 

Hyde Park, 

Milton, 

Quincy, 

Total 



19,279 
17,534 
27,760 
23,603 
31,745 



23,481 

9,706 

33,587 



119,921 

19,935 

7,457 

13,244 

6,578 

23,899 

257,808 



9.11 

3.76 

13.03 



46.52 
7.73 
2.89 
5.14 
2.55 
9.27 



100.00 



Boston, June 9, 1905. 



PATRICK H. COONEY, 
OSCAR A. HARDEN, 
NATHANIEL N. JONES, 

Apportionment Commissioners. 



No. 57.] AND SEWEEAGE BOAKD. 233 



Appendix lo. 8. 



LEGISLATION OF THE YEAR 1905 AFFECTING THE 
METROPOLITAN WATER AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



ACTS OP 1905. 



[Chapter 211.] 
An Act to establish a new fiscal year for the commonwealth. 
Be it enacted, etc., asjollows : 

Section 1. The fiscal year of all offices, departments, The fiscal year 
boards, commissions, hospitals, asylums, charitable, penal and monweaithto 

t>6fiin Decern.- 

reformatory institutions of the Commonwealth shall begin with ber 1, etc. 
the first day of December and end with the following thirtieth 
day of November, and all books and accounts therein shall be 
kept by fiscal years as herein established, and the annual re- 
ports of all officers, trustees, boards and commissions, except 
the report of the insurance commissioner and except those 
reports otherwise provided for in this act, shall be made to the 
governor and council, or to the general court, as now required 
by law, except that they shall be made on or before the third 
Wednesday in January, anything in any general or special 
statute now existing to the contrary notwithstanding. Such 
reports shall be deposited with the secretary of the Common- 
wealth, who shall transmit them to the governor and council or 
to the general court. The financial statements now required by 
law to be included therein shall be made for the fiscal year as 
herein established. The annual meetings of trustees of state 
institutions and of state boards, at which financial statements 
are required by law to be presented, shall be held in the month 
of December in each year. 

Section 14. This act shall take effect on the thirty-first 
day of December in the year nineteen hundred and five. 
[Approved March 23, 1905. 



■j:\ 1 



METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



South Metro 

polltaii system 
dispoe 



[Ohaptbb 214.] 
An Act MAKING an appropriation fob operating the south 

METROPOLITAN SYSTEM OF SEWAGE DISPOSAL. 

lh it - n <•., as follows : 

Section 1. A sum not exceeding one hundred and forty- 
four thousand uine hundred and twenty dollars is hereby appro- 
priated, to be paid out of the South Metropolitan System Main- 
tenance Fund, for the cost of maintenance and operation of the 
south metropolitan system of sewage disposal, comprising a 
part of Boston, the cities of Newton, Quincy and Waltham, 
and the towns of Brookline, Watertown, Dedham, Hyde Park 
and Milton, during the year ending on the thirty-first day of 
December, nineteen hundred and five. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage 
[Approved March 24, 1905. 



North Metro- 
politan system 
of sewage 
disposal. 



[Chapter 215.] 

An Act making an appropriation for operating the north 
metropolitan system of sewage disposal. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows : 

Section 1. A sum not exceeding one hundred and twenty- 
seven thousand dollars is hereby appropriated, to be paid out 
of the North Metropolitan System Maintenance Fund for the 
maintenance and operation of the system of sewage disposal for 
the cities and towns included in what is known as the north 
metropolitan system, during the year ending on the thirty-first 
day of December, nineteen hundred and five. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved March 24, 1905. 



Assessments 
upon cities 
and towns in 
the Metropoli- 
tan water, 
sewerage and 
park district-. 



[Chapter 457.] 

An Act relative to assessments upon cities and towns in the 
metropolitan water, sewerage and park districts. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1 . In case any apportionment for assessment upon 
the cities and towns of either the metropolitan water, sewerage 
or park districts shall not have been finally determined by July 
first of any year, the last apportionment thereof shall remain in 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 235 

force for the purpose of assessment during such current year. 
Any difference between such apportionment when finally made 
by the commission, for such year, and the preexisting appor- 
tionment above referred to, shall be adjusted with such city or 
town by the treasurer and receiver general in the assessment of 
the succeeding year by a deduction therefrom or an addition 
thereto, as may be required to give effect to the said apportion- 
ment when made as aforesaid. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved May 25, 1905. 



[Chapter 466.] 

An Act to authorize the boston elevated railway company 
to construct a subway or subways in the city of cam- 
bridge. 

Be it enacted^ etc., as follows : 

Section 10. Upon the written request of the company, the Pipes, etc. 

L " may be 

city shall order the temporary or permanent removal or reloca- removed. 

tion of any surface tracks, conduits, pipes, wires, poles, or 
other property of the Commonwealth, or of any person or cor- 
poration except the city or the company, which the company 
deems to interfere with the construction or operation of the 
subway or subways, and the city shall grant new locations for 
any such structures previously having locations. Such order, to 
the extent specified therein, shall be deemed a revocation of the 
right or license to maintain such surface tracks, conduits, wires, 
pipes, poles or other property, and the owner of any such 
structures in public ways or lands shall comply with such order 
without expense to the company. If such owner shall fail to 
comply with such order within a reasonable time to be fixed 
therein, the company may remove such surface tracks, conduits, 
pipes, wires, poles or other property, and may relocate and 
reconstruct the same, and the cost of such removal, relocation 
and reconstruction shall be repaid to the company by the owner. 
No such discontinuance, removal or relocation shall entitle the 
owner of the property thus affected to any damages on account 
thereof. The removal and relocation of any property of the 
Commonwealth shall be subject to the approval of the board 
having charge thereof, and at the expense of the company. 
Any gas or electric lighting company may shut off the gas or 



236 WATKK AND SEWERAGE BOARD. [P. D. No. 57. 

Current from any pipes or wires affected by any action done 
hereunder, when and so far as may be necessary to avoid the 
escape or explosion of gas, or to avoid other public danger. 
Temporary locations shall be granted on request of the com- 
pany, for any surface tracks owned or operated by it; and, as 
soon as the state of the work permits the same may be re- 
stored to the original locations as nearly as may be, 

[Approved May 26, 1905. 



Morgan. 



[Chapter 55.] 
Resolve in favor of michael morgan. 
to Michael Resolved, That there be allowed and paid out of the Metro- 



politan Water Maintenance Fund the sum of six hundred and 
fifty dollars to Michael Morgan of Natick, an employee of the 
metropolitan water and sewerage board, on account of the death 
of his daughter, Mary Morgan, ten years of age, who was 
drowned on the twenty-seventh day of July in the year nineteen 
hundred and three, by falling into the Sudbury aqueduct of the 
metropolitan water works in the town of Natick through a trap 
door which was negligently left open by employees of the Com- 
monwealth. [Approved April 21, 1905. 



Index to Legislation of the Tear 1905 



AFFECTING THE 



METROPOLITAN WATER AND SEWERAGE BOARD, 



A. 

APPROPRIATIONS. Chap. Sect. 

North Metropolitan System of Sewage Disposal, for maintenance of, . . 215 1 

South Metropolitan System of Sewage Disposal, for maintenance of, . . 214 1 

ASSESSMENTS. 

apportionment of, not determined by July 1, relative to, . . . . 457 1 

B. 

BOSTON ELEVATED RAILWAY. 

may remove pipes, etc., in construction of subway in Cambridge, . . . 46(5 10 

C. 

CITIES AND TOWNS. 

apportionment of assessments not determined July 1, relative to, . . 457 1 

M. 

METROPOLITAN DISTRICT. 

assessment on cities and towns in, relative to, 457 1 

METROPOLITAN WATER MAINTENANCE FUND. 

payment from, to Michael Morgan, Resolves, 55 

MORGAN, MICHAEL. 

payment to, in re death of his daughter, Resolves, 55 

N. 

NORTH METROPOLITAN SYSTEM OP SEWAGE DISPOSAL. 

appropriation for operation, etc., of, 215 1 

P. 

PIPES. 

removal, etc., of, in construction of subway in Cambridge, .... 466 10 

S. 

SOUTH METROPOLITAN SYSTEM OP SEWAGE DISPOSAL. 

appropriation for operation, etc., of, . . .214 1 

SUBWAY IN CAMBRIDGE. 

pipes, etc., of Commonwealth, may be removed in construction of, . . . 466 10